The Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund (SIEF)

 

What SIEF does

The World Bank’s Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund (SIEF) supports scientifically rigorous research that measures the impact of programs and policies to improve education, health, access to quality water and sanitation, and early childhood development in low and middle income countries. The majority of the evaluation are randomized control trials (RCTs) and they were chosen through a competitive process open to researchers worldwide. Read more.

Funding rigorous evaluations

SIEF has funded 61 impact evaluations in 31 countries, including: Bangladesh, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chad, Colombia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, 
Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan,
Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda. Read more.

Building capacity

A key objective of SIEF is to strengthen the ability of researchers and policymakers to use monitoring and evaluation to build evidence on the effectiveness of programs to improve people’s lives through better health, nutrition, education, water and sanitation and social protection. SIEF sponsors quarterly workshops to train regional policymakers, researchers and development field staff in the nuts and bolts of impact evaluation. The goal is to encourage and support increased use of impact evaluation and to create a community of practice among development experts and policymakers. Read more.

 

SIEF has funded 61 impact evaluations of programs in four areas critical to human development: early childhood nutrition and development, education, health, and water and sanitation. Detailed information about each evaluation is found through the links below.

 

Between 2007 and 2012, with funding primarily from the Government of Spain, SIEF funded a set of impact evaluations that reviewed a range of projects across a variety of human development areas. Further information about these evaluations and the results is available through the links below. 

A key objective of SIEF is to strengthen the ability of researchers and policymakers to use monitoring and evaluation to build evidence on the effectiveness of programs to improve people’s lives through better health, nutrition, education, water and sanitation and social protection. SIEF sponsors quarterly workshops to train regional policymakers, researchers and development field staff in the nuts and bolts of impact evaluation. The goal is to encourage and support increased use of impact evaluation and to create a community of practice among development experts and policymakers. Workshops are invitation only and geared to specific development organizations, researchers, NGOs and government officials.

Workshops use materials from the Impact Evaluation in Practice - Second Edition handbook available in English.

 

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  • EGRA Toolkit
    A user manual that for countries beginning to work with EGRA in such areas as local adaptation of the instrument, fieldwork, and analysis of results.
  • Stallings User Guide
  • Impact Evaluation in Practice - Second Edition
    The updated version covers the newest techniques for evaluating programs and includes state-of-the-art implementation advice, as well as an expanded set of examples and case studies that draw on recent development challenges.
  • Measuring for Early Years
    Information and resources related to measuring the quality of early learning programs and early childhood skills
  • Examining Early Child Development in Low-Income Countries: A Toolkit for the Assessment of Children in the First Five Years of Life
    The primary purpose of this toolkit is to provide a resource for researchers from various disciplines interested in planning and evaluating programs or interventions aimed at improving the health and development of infants and young children. The toolkit aims to: provide an overview of issues affecting early development and its measurement; discuss the types of tests typically used with children under five years; provide guidelines for selecting and adapting tests for use in developing countries, and make recommendations for planning successful assessment strategies. The toolkit focuses on children who have not yet entered school, and are thus under six years old.
  • Measuring the Quality of Health Care in Clinics
    Until quite recently, governments and aid organizations have tried to improve health outcomes by investing in infrastructure, medical equipment, and drug supplies and by ensuring access to a certain number of qualified health workers. While these inputs are of course necessary for these functions, they are by no means sufficient. The presence of stethoscope is no guarantee that a medical provider will use it when necessary. A regular stock of modern drugs does not tell us if providers are prescribing tranquilizers for a simple cold or whether a provider can diagnose if a patient even has a cold. This note provides a brief overview of the surveys designed to measure the quality of care within clinics, focusing in particular on the quality of examination, diagnosis, and treatment offered to patients in the primary care setting.

This page lists a sample of publications from SIEF-supported impact evaluations. Please see individual evaluation pages for specific publications produced by SIEF research teams, including media coverage, presentations and videos. In addition, visit our Interviews and Blogs page, our Measurement and Data page, Videos page, our Impact page and other webpages for more products related to SIEF evaluations and our impact on policy.

 

World Bank publications

Supporting Disadvantaged Children to Enter Kindergarten: Experimental Evidence from Bulgaria
June 2017
Elise Huillery, Joost de Laat, and Paul Gertler

Testing and Scaling-up Supply- and Demand-side Interventions to Improve Kindergarten Educational Quality in Ghana
March 2017 (revised June 2017)
Sharon Wolfa, Edward Tsinigob, Jere Behrmanc, and J. Lawrence Aber

 

Peer reviewed journal articles

Journal of Labor Economics
The Impact of Expanding Access to Early Childhood Education Services in Rural Indonesia
July 2017
Sally Anne Brinkman, Amer Hasan, Haeil Jung, Angela Kinnell, Menno Pradhan

European Early Childhood Education Research Journal
The role of preschool quality in promoting child development: evidence from rural Indonesia
June 2017
Sally Anne Brinkman, Amer Hasan, Haeil Jung, Angela Kinnell, Nozomi Nakajima, and Menno Pradhan

 

Other publications

Kenya Patient Safety Impact Evaluation (KePSIE)
Case Study: Improving Patient Safety in Kenya
September 2016
Guadalupe Bedoya, Jorge Coarasa, Jishnu Das, Amy Dolinger, Ana Goicoechea, Njeri Mwaura, Khama Rogo, and Frank Wafula

Drugs - Real World Outcomes
Examining the Quality of Medicines at Kenya Health Facilities: A Validation of an Alternative Post-Market Surveillance Model that Uses Standardized Patients
March 2016
Francis Wafula, Amy Dolinger, Benjamin Daniels, Njeri Mwaura, Guadalupe Bedoya, Khama Rogo, Ana Goicoechea, Jishnu Das, and Bernard Olayo 

 

Evidence to Policy briefs

Pakistan: Does Sharing Test Scores with Parents Improve Student Learning?

Tunisia: Can Entrepreneurship Education Improve Work Opportunities for College Graduates?

More policy briefs here >>

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    Cambodia: Scholarship Program

    An impact evaluation, supported by SIEF, measured the effect of scholarships on enrollment in lower secondary school. The evaluation found not only that children who received the scholarship were more likely to stay in school, but also that a $45 scholarship was as effective as a $60 one.
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    Morocco: Tayssir - A conditional cash transfer program to keep rural children in school

    The parents of 80,000 students or primary school-aged children were given cash subsidies in return for keeping their children in school. The evaluation found the cash had a positive impact on enrollment and in reducing the dropout rate and the repetition rate.
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    Mozambique: Helping Kids Succeed

    Researchers worked with Save the Children to design a randomized control trial (RCT) to measure whether getting children in preschool made a difference. The evaluation found children who attended preschool were 24 percent more likely to be enrolled in primary school at the end of the two years.
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    Tanzania: Cash transfers for health and education

    In 2010, the Government of Tanzania rolled out the conditional cash transfer program. The project had a significant positive impact on children’s health and on household savings and household independence within the community.
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    Teacher Training Programs - What Works?

    There are winners and losers in teacher training programs. The researchers decided to search for impact evaluations of teacher training programs with student learning outcomes, categorize the programs by their essential characteristics, and see which (if any) of those characteristics were associated with learning gains.
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    Zambia: Improving Drug Distribution System

    The researchers tested two methods for ensuring that often remote clinics were able to maintain stocks of essential medicines. A rigorous impact evaluation found that shipping drugs directly to clinics, instead of to a holding facility, and having a dedicated staff member to facilitate and track orders reduced stock outs of drugs needed to save lives.