BRIEF

Evidence to Policy: Early Childhood Development notes

October 3, 2016

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Evidence to Policy, a monthly note series on learning what works, highlights studies that evaluate the impact of programs in the critical areas of human development --health, education, social protection, water and sanitation and labor. From how to best supply rural health clinics with drugs to what helps students do better in school, World Bank-supported impact evaluations provide governments and development experts with the information they need to use resources most effectively. As impact evaluations increasingly become more important to policymakers, this series offers a non-technical review of the many innovations the World Bank is supporting, and the growing number of rigorous studies analyzing the impacts of those innovations. The note series is managed by SIEF, which receives generous funding from the British government's Department for International Development and the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF).

 

COLOMBIA: CAN A SUCCESSFUL PARENTING PROGRAM BE IMPLEMENTED AT SCALE?

Children everywhere need enough nutritious food and stimulation to grow and develop to their full potential. Yet many disadvantaged children in low-income countries do not receive the support they need in the first years of life, negatively affecting their future health, education, and earnings. This research in Colombia shows that it is possible to deliver a model of early childhood education at scale and through existing government services.

 

GHANA: CAN TRAINING CHANGE PREPRIMARY TEACHERS’ PRACTICES AND IMPROVE CHILDREN’S SKILLS?

To ensure that children arrive in primary school ready to learn, policymakers around the world are increasingly focusing on what happens in preprimary education programs. In Ghana, SIEF-supported researchers used a randomized control trial to measure the impact of the teacher training on its own and of twinning it with an educational component for parents to inform them about what’s developmentally appropriate in preprimary education.

 

MALAWI: CAN STEPS TO IMPROVE CHILD CENTERS HELP BOOST CHILD DEVELOPMENT?

In Malawi, researchers supported by the Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund (SIEF) worked with the government to study the impact of a pilot program to improve the quality of the country’s Community-Based Childcare Centers, which serve children aged three to five years old in rural areas. 

 

BANGLADESH: CAN CHILD STIMULATION MESSAGES BE ADDED TO AN EXISTING PLATFORM FOR DELIVERING HEALTH AND NUTRITION INFORMATION?

The Government of Bangladesh is working with a variety of partners on initiatives to improve early childhood development and provide the country’s youngest citizens with a good start. The World Bank’s Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund (SIEF) supported an evaluation to test the impact of adding a child stimulation component to a national nutrition program.

 

CAMBODIA: CHALLENGES IN SCALING UP PRESCHOOLS

Researchers worked with the Government of Cambodia to evaluate the impact of three pilot early childhood development programs that were being scaled up with assistance from the World Bank. 

 

JAMAICA: HELPING CHILDREN DEVELOP INTO HEALTHY, PRODUCTIVE ADULTS

This policy note reviews the evaluation of a program in Jamaica that targeted mothers of babies stunted due to malnutrition, offering a rare look at the effects of early childhood intervention over the decades.
Also available in SpanishFrench

 

MOZAMBIQUE: DO PRESCHOOLS HELP CHILDREN?

To test the effectiveness of preschool programs on children’s enrollment in and readiness for primary school, the World Bank supported a study of an early childhood development preschool program in Mozambique run by Save the Children. The evaluation showed that children enrolled in preschool were better prepared for the demands of schooling than children who did not attend preschool and that they were more likely to start primary school by age 6.
Also available in FrenchSpanish

 

NEPAL: CAN INFORMATION AND CASH IMPROVE CHILDREN'S DEVELOPMENT?

In Nepal, researchers supported by the World Bank’s Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund worked with the government to develop a program to inform pregnant women and mothers of young children on how to best care for themselves and their children, using already ongoing community meetings to deliver messages.

 

NIGER: CAN CASH AND BEHAVIORAL CHANGE PROGRAMS IMPROVE CHILD DEVELOPMENT?

An evaluation of an effort to improve child development through a social safety nets program found that behavioral change activities improved women’s knowledge and practices. But there was little impact on children’s physical growth or cognitive development.

Also available in French

 

INDONESIA: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FINDINGS AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

This policy brief provides an overview of the ECED sector and uses findings from an ongoing World Bank-supported ECED project to make preliminary policy recommendations to guide these initiatives. This brief shows that the ECED project has had several positive effects, including increased enrollment rates and higher developmental outcomes for children. The project objectives are to increase access to ECED services among the poor and enhance children's school readiness. This is done through a package of interventions which are delivered sequentially and include: community facilitation, block grants, and teacher training.
Also available in Bahasa (Indonesian)

 

INDONESIA: A SNAPSHOT OF EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

In an effort to understand whether the program is improving children's development and readiness for primary school, and what factors contribute to effectiveness of ECED services, MoNE is undertaking an impact evaluation that tracks over 6,400 children (ages 1 and 4) for a period of three years. The baseline results summarized here are the first to show relationships between parental education, nutrition, and stimulating learning environments and child developmental outcomes in Indonesia. 
Also available in Bahasa (Indonesian)