Global Water Security & Sanitation Partnership (GWSP)

Water touches nearly every aspect of development. It drives economic growth, supports healthy ecosystems and is fundamental for life. However, this critical resource can harm as well as help. Water-related hazards such as floods, storms, and droughts are responsible for 9 out of 10 natural disasters.  Climate change is expected to increase this risk and place even greater stress on scarce water supplies.

New challenges and new contexts require new responses.  That’s why the World Bank, together with its partners, has launched a new partnership for a water-secure world, the Global Water Security & Sanitation Partnership (GWSP).  Building on a nearly half-century of collaboration driven by the Water and Sanitation Program (WSP), the Water Partnership Program (WPP) and others, the GWSP aims to provide action equal to the ambition articulated within the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs.) 

The GWSP primarily focuses on advancing knowledge and building capacity.  It supports client governments to achieve the water-related SDGs through the generation of innovative global knowledge and the provision of country-level support, while leveraging World Bank Group financial instruments and promoting global dialogue and advocacy with key partners and clients to increase reach and impact. This Partnership will provide new opportunities to test and scale-up innovations, build country capacity where needed and influence client demand and World Bank operations.

Learn more about GWSP in this brochure.

View our fact sheet

Check out the 2018 Cartoon Calendar

The GWSP has identified five priority themes for action:

Sustainability  |  Inclusion  |  Institutions  |  Financing  |  Resilience

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Sustainability is ultimately about ensuring that available resources today can continue to deliver benefits to future generations. The partnership focuses on two critical aspects for ensuring long-term sustainability of water investments. Firstly, the sustainable management of water resources.  This means securing the long-term availability of water resources, considering the impacts of population growth, rapid urbanization and climate change. Secondly, infrastructure assets should be adequately built and maintained, to ensure for example that handpumps do not break down prematurely or that treatment plants are not abandoned for lack of adequate maintenance. 

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Inclusion is the process of improving the terms for individuals and groups who are disadvantaged based on their identity, to take part in society.  Water belongs to everyone and yet many are excluded from its benefits and often from ownership and control of this critical resource.  Ensuring that a project is inclusive enhances the inclusion agenda requires better knowledge on the nature of water inequality, enhancing capacity and putting in place incentives that will result in better outcomes.  Underlying such design also requires strong institutions that will hold state and service providers accountable. 

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Expanding access to and improving the quality of services can only be achieved and sustained if the institutional arrangements provide the right incentives and resources and the organizations tasked with service delivery also have the requisite capacity. Institutions comprise the formal and informal rules of the game within which these organizations operate and, through them, impact the quality and sustainability of services.  To the extent that providers of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and irrigation services are (quasi) government entities, they are influenced by the broader governance environment and the institutional architecture of the public sector that goes beyond the water sector. To strengthen institutions and accountability for service provision, GWSP works to understand the rules of the game and incentive structures, grounded in local cultures, economies, and political circumstances.

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Financing needs to expand access to safely managed water to deliver on the SDGs.  Sanitation services alone have been estimated at US $114 billion per year up to 2030. That’s vastly more than the amount historically invested to expand access, and much more will be needed to deliver universal access and to manage water resources and infrastructure sustainably.  A two-pronged approach is needed. Firstly, improving the financial viability of the water sector to ensure that “water can pay for water”, while ensuring affordability of services for the poor. Secondly, leveraging commercial and non-state sources of financing will be critical so that the sector can tap new financial sources.  Read: Danube Water - Identifying alternative financing for the water sector

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Management of water resources and water facilities will increasingly be subject to shocks in years to come. That’s because climate change is predicted to increase climate variability and extreme weather events, such as floods and droughts.  Resilient solutions call for strategies and tools at the country, basin, and project level capable of incorporating not only climate and disaster risk consideration into the analysis, but also innovative solutions to ease water scarcity constraints as well as socioeconomic and environmental considerations. Building climate resilience will require developing tools and approaches that can help save lives and livelihoods. Resilient water services (water and sanitation, irrigation, etc.) are better able to adapt to shocks and stresses and continue delivering essential services to the population. 

Of course, these themes do not exist in isolation and need to be rolled out simultaneously so that actions under each of these themes can mutually reinforce each other and can contribute to the many other SDGs with which they are so closely interlinked.

A NEW APPROACH

The GWSP primarily focuses on advancing knowledge and building capacity. It supports client governments to achieve the water-related SDGs through the generation of innovative global knowledge and the provision of country-level support. It leverages World Bank Group financial instruments and promotes global dialogue and advocacy with key partners and clients to increase reach and impact. This Partnership provides new opportunities to test and expand innovations, builds country capacity and informs client country demand and World Bank operations.

 

BACKGROUND

The GWSP is a ‘living laboratory’ which provides countries with guidance, policymakers with knowledge and learning products, and the public with resources about why water is so crucial to the world’s wellbeing. The GSWP, hosted by the World Bank’s Water Global Practice (Water GP), offers many years of experience from the ground, some of the world’s foremost water experts and the ability to convene a wide range of diverse actors.

 

MEASURING RESULTS

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The GWSP will measure results at three different levels:

Block A: Direct results from activities funded by the Partnership

Block B: Impact of GWSP activities on the Water GP itself

Block C: Combined results at the client country level

 

List of Block C Countries: Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Egypt, Ethiopia, Haiti, Kenya, Vietnam and Pakistan

At the core of GWSP’s model is a belief that first-rate research and systematic knowledge is essential to maintaining the high quality of World Bank operations. It is equally essential to shaping the external debate as part of our mission to deliver a water-secure world for all. So the GWSP produces strategic, robust and practical information, insights and ideas to shape both practice and policy.

Knowledge Highlights from the Water Global Practice 2016-2018

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GLOBAL

REGIONAL

Water and the Economy

Africa

Financing

East Asia and Pacific

Inclusion

Europe and Central Asia

Institutions

Latin America and the Caribbean

Resilience

Middle East and North Africa

Sustainability

South Asia

See All World Bank Publications on Water

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UNCHARTED WATERS: THE NEW ECONOMICS OF WATER SCARCITY AND VARIABILITY

Author(s):  Damania, Desbureaux, Hyland, Islam, Moore, Rodella, Russ, Zaveri

This book presents new evidence to advance our understanding of how rainfall shocks, coupled with water scarcity, affect farms, firms, and families. A key message is that water has multiple economic attributes that entail distinct policy responses at each stage in its cycle of use. If water is not managed more prudently— from source, to tap, and back to source—the crises observed today will become the catastrophes of tomorrow.

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HIGH AND DRY: CLIMATE CHANGE, WATER, AND THE ECONOMY

ALSO AVAILABLE IN FRENCH, SPANISH AND ARABIC

Author(s): Water GP | Focus: Water, Poverty and the Economy

The impacts of climate change will be channeled primarily through the water cycle, with consequences that could be large and uneven across the globe. Water-related climate risks cascade through food, energy, urban, and environmental systems. Growing populations, rising incomes, and expanding cities will converge upon a world where the demand for water rises exponentially, while supply becomes more erratic and uncertain. They will jeopardize growth prospects in the regions worst affected and in some of the poorest countries.

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WATER, WELL-BEING, AND THE PROSPERITY OF FUTURE GENERATIONS

Author(s): Chase, Damania |Focus: Water, Poverty and the Economy

This discussion paper provides an overview of the poverty-related impacts of inadequate water supply and sanitation and highlights the policy challenges that have emerged in a more populated, polluted, and urbanized world with finite water resources. It highlights the need for sustained changes in individual behavior, more equitable access to services, and incentives for improved water resource stewardship.

  See All Publications on WATER and the ECONOMY


See the full selection of reports, case studies and toolkits supported by GWSP

Last Updated: Oct 30, 2018

 

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Water Project Results 

Updated every month

The World Bank’s water portfolio currently covers 175 projects worth US$27 billion in lending and technical expertise. In the "Project of the Month" series, we feature the results achieved by these projects and showcase how the World Bank works with countries to address challenges and deliver solutions on the ground.

Image

2018 Water Cartoon Calendar

Dec. 14, 2017

Under the auspices of Global Water Security and Sanitation Partnership (GWSP), the Water Cartoon Calendar has carried on the tradition of raising awareness around critical global water issues through humor. 

Image

Citywide Inclusive Sanitation Initiative

Nov. 19, 2017

Citywide Inclusive Sanitation means that everybody benefits from adequate sanitation, with human waste being safely managed at every point along the service chain. The cities show-cased in these videos each demonstrate experiences that have embraced such approaches to ensuring the poor are provided with sanitation services.

Image

Aggregation of Water Supply and Sanitation Utilities

Nov.14, 2017

Water Supply and Sanitation utilities work together, or “aggregate”, when multiple municipalities unite under a single administrative structure. The World Bank’s Water Global Practice launched a toolkit and background report which explore why, when and how water utilities can work together to provide better services.

Image

Uncharted Waters: The New Economics of Water Scarcity and Variability

Oct. 24, 2017

The report looks at how the increasing number of droughts and floods impact farms, firms, and families in ways that are far costlier and longer lasting than known before. 

Image

Water’s Promise

Sept. 21, 2017

As part of High Level Panel on Water (HLPW)’s campaign for valuing water, the video was shown to a few heads of state at the UN General Assembly 2017 in New York, calling for a fundamental shift in the way the world looks at water.

Image

Beyond Scarcity: Water Security in the Middle East and North Africa

Aug. 29, 2017

The report draws on regional and global examples to show that limited water resources need not restrict the region’s future, but that a combination of technology, policy and management can convert scarcity into security.

Image

The Rising Tide: A New Look at Water and Gender

Aug. 29, 2017

The report shows how water often reflects, and even reinforces, gender inequality examining how norms and practices related to water often exacerbate ingrained gender and other hierarchies.

Image

Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Poverty Diagnostic Initiative

Aug. 28, 2017

This initiative – which encompasses 18 countries ranging from fragile and conflict-affected states to middle-income countries – undertook multidisciplinary research and developed in­novative methods to fully appreciate the impacts of inadequate services on human development outcomes and identify the binding constraints to service delivery. 

Image

2017 World Water Week

August 27-September 01, 2017

World Water Week in Stockholm is the annual focal point for the globe’s water issues. People from around the world come to Stockholm to network, exchange ideas, foster new thinking, and develop solutions to the most pressing water-related challenges of today. The World Bank Group has convened and participated in over 30 sessions of 2017 World Water Week.

Image

Thirsty Energy: Water-Smart Energy Planning in South Africa

June 15, 2017

As part of the Thirsty Energy Initiative to incorporate water constraints into its energy-planning model and foster a more sustainable system, the report “Modeling the Water–Energy Nexus: How Do Water Constraints Affect Energy Planning in South Africa?” finds that accounting for the regional vari­ability of water supply (and the associated costs of water supply infrastructure) can significantly impact energy planning, especially in a water-scarce country like South Africa.

Image

Water-Scarce Cities Initiative

May 15, 2017

Water scarce cities around the world, in both high income and developing countries, are undertaking a paradigm shift in how policy, technology, and management systems are applied to improve financial and ecological sustainability and social equity. The Water Scarce Cities (WSC) Initiative brings together practitioners to learn from each other and accelerate the adoption of this new paradigm in all of the water stressed regions of the world.

Image

2017 Sanitation and Water for All (SWA) High-level Meetings - Finance Ministers’ Meeting

Apr. 20, 2017

The 2017 SWA High-level Meetings (HLMs), which took place in Washington D.C. on 20 April during World Bank-IMF Spring Meetings, included a Finance Ministers’ Meeting (FMM) convened by the World Bank on behalf of the SWA partnership, and a Sector Ministers’ Meeting convened by UNICEF, including ministers responsible for water, sanitation, and hygiene. Countries and partners discussed national plans to meet the challenges of the water, sanitation and hygiene-related SDG targets and required resources. 

Image

Turbulent Waters: Pursuing Water Security in Fragile Contexts

Apr. 18, 2017

The report finds that when water insecurity repeatedly affects populations, it can act as a risk multiplier, fueling the perception that institutions and governments are ‘not doing enough’, exacerbating existing grievances, creating new risks, and deepening inequities. In turn, this contributes to destabilizing already fragile contexts, aggravating the challenges of water management, and perpetuating a vicious cycle of water insecurity and fragility.

Image

Performance of Water Utilities in Africa

Mar. 21, 2017

The report finds that many water utilities in Africa are working hard to expand access, but most haven’t kept up with the growing demand or the maintenance on aging infrastructure. This has left only one third of urban residents with piped water to their homes. Increasing access to a safe water supply will require more investment in utility infrastructure, while improving the capacity to operate and maintain services.

Image

Solar Water Pumping for Sustainable Water Supply

Jan. 1, 2016

Even though solar water pumping is ready for mainstreaming and has started to take off in some parts of the world, its benefits remain largely unknown to communities, governments, and development institutions. To address this knowledge gap, the World Bank has developed an accessible and interactive Knowledge Base on Solar Water Pumping, aiming to raise awareness about the technology and provide resources that help incorporate it into operations.

Image

Water Project Results 

Updated every month

The World Bank’s water portfolio currently covers 175 projects worth US$27 billion in lending and technical expertise. In the "Project of the Month" series, we feature the results achieved by these projects and showcase how the World Bank works with countries to address challenges and deliver solutions on the ground.

 

Image

2018 Water Cartoon Calendar

Dec. 14, 2017

Under the auspices of Global Water Security and Sanitation Partnership (GWSP), the Water Cartoon Calendar has carried on the tradition of raising awareness around critical global water issues through humor. 

Image

Citywide Inclusive Sanitation Initiative

Nov. 19, 2017

Citywide Inclusive Sanitation means that everybody benefits from adequate sanitation, with human waste being safely managed at every point along the service chain. The cities show-cased in these videos each demonstrate experiences that have embraced such approaches to ensuring the poor are provided with sanitation services.

Image

Aggregation of Water Supply and Sanitation Utilities

Nov.14, 2017

Water Supply and Sanitation utilities work together, or “aggregate”, when multiple municipalities unite under a single administrative structure. The World Bank’s Water Global Practice launched a toolkit and background report which explore why, when and how water utilities can work together to provide better services.

Image

Uncharted Waters: The New Economics of Water Scarcity and Variability

Oct. 24, 2017

The report looks at how the increasing number of droughts and floods impact farms, firms, and families in ways that are far costlier and longer lasting than known before. 

Image

Water’s Promise

Sept. 21, 2017

As part of High Level Panel on Water (HLPW)’s campaign for valuing water, the video was shown to a few heads of state at the UN General Assembly 2017 in New York, calling for a fundamental shift in the way the world looks at water.

Image

Beyond Scarcity: Water Security in the Middle East and North Africa

Aug. 29, 2017

The report draws on regional and global examples to show that limited water resources need not restrict the region’s future, but that a combination of technology, policy and management can convert scarcity into security.

Image

The Rising Tide: A New Look at Water and Gender

Aug. 29, 2017

The report shows how water often reflects, and even reinforces, gender inequality examining how norms and practices related to water often exacerbate ingrained gender and other hierarchies.

Image

Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Poverty Diagnostic Initiative

Aug. 28, 2017

This initiative – which encompasses 18 countries ranging from fragile and conflict-affected states to middle-income countries – undertook multidisciplinary research and developed in­novative methods to fully appreciate the impacts of inadequate services on human development outcomes and identify the binding constraints to service delivery. 

Image

2017 World Water Week

August 27-September 01, 2017

World Water Week in Stockholm is the annual focal point for the globe’s water issues. People from around the world come to Stockholm to network, exchange ideas, foster new thinking, and develop solutions to the most pressing water-related challenges of today. The World Bank Group has convened and participated in over 30 sessions of 2017 World Water Week.

 

Image

Thirsty Energy: Water-Smart Energy Planning in South Africa

June 15, 2017

As part of the Thirsty Energy Initiative to incorporate water constraints into its energy-planning model and foster a more sustainable system, the report “Modeling the Water–Energy Nexus: How Do Water Constraints Affect Energy Planning in South Africa?” finds that accounting for the regional vari­ability of water supply (and the associated costs of water supply infrastructure) can significantly impact energy planning, especially in a water-scarce country like South Africa.

Image

Water-Scarce Cities Initiative

May 15, 2017

Water scarce cities around the world, in both high income and developing countries, are undertaking a paradigm shift in how policy, technology, and management systems are applied to improve financial and ecological sustainability and social equity. The Water Scarce Cities (WSC) Initiative brings together practitioners to learn from each other and accelerate the adoption of this new paradigm in all of the water stressed regions of the world.

Image

2017 Sanitation and Water for All (SWA) High-level Meetings - Finance Ministers’ Meeting

Apr. 20, 2017

The 2017 SWA High-level Meetings (HLMs), which took place in Washington D.C. on 20 April during World Bank-IMF Spring Meetings, included a Finance Ministers’ Meeting (FMM) convened by the World Bank on behalf of the SWA partnership, and a Sector Ministers’ Meeting convened by UNICEF, including ministers responsible for water, sanitation, and hygiene. Countries and partners discussed national plans to meet the challenges of the water, sanitation and hygiene-related SDG targets and required resources. 

Image

Turbulent Waters: Pursuing Water Security in Fragile Contexts

Apr. 18, 2017

The report finds that when water insecurity repeatedly affects populations, it can act as a risk multiplier, fueling the perception that institutions and governments are ‘not doing enough’, exacerbating existing grievances, creating new risks, and deepening inequities. In turn, this contributes to destabilizing already fragile contexts, aggravating the challenges of water management, and perpetuating a vicious cycle of water insecurity and fragility.

Image

Performance of Water Utilities in Africa

Mar. 21, 2017

The report finds that many water utilities in Africa are working hard to expand access, but most haven’t kept up with the growing demand or the maintenance on aging infrastructure. This has left only one third of urban residents with piped water to their homes. Increasing access to a safe water supply will require more investment in utility infrastructure, while improving the capacity to operate and maintain services.

Image

Solar Water Pumping for Sustainable Water Supply

Jan. 1, 2016

Even though solar water pumping is ready for mainstreaming and has started to take off in some parts of the world, its benefits remain largely unknown to communities, governments, and development institutions. To address this knowledge gap, the World Bank has developed an accessible and interactive Knowledge Base on Solar Water Pumping, aiming to raise awareness about the technology and provide resources that help incorporate it into operations.

Image

Water Project Results 

Updated every month

The World Bank’s water portfolio currently covers 175 projects worth US$27 billion in lending and technical expertise. In the "Project of the Month" series, we feature the results achieved by these projects and showcase how the World Bank works with countries to address challenges and deliver solutions on the ground.

 

Image

2018 Water Cartoon Calendar

Dec. 14, 2017

Under the auspices of Global Water Security and Sanitation Partnership (GWSP), the Water Cartoon Calendar has carried on the tradition of raising awareness around critical global water issues through humor. 

Image

Citywide Inclusive Sanitation Initiative

Nov. 19, 2017

Citywide Inclusive Sanitation means that everybody benefits from adequate sanitation, with human waste being safely managed at every point along the service chain. The cities show-cased in these videos each demonstrate experiences that have embraced such approaches to ensuring the poor are provided with sanitation services.

Image

Aggregation of Water Supply and Sanitation Utilities

Nov.14, 2017

Water Supply and Sanitation utilities work together, or “aggregate”, when multiple municipalities unite under a single administrative structure. The World Bank’s Water Global Practice launched a toolkit and background report which explore why, when and how water utilities can work together to provide better services.

Image

Uncharted Waters: The New Economics of Water Scarcity and Variability

Oct. 24, 2017

The report looks at how the increasing number of droughts and floods impact farms, firms, and families in ways that are far costlier and longer lasting than known before. 

Image

Water’s Promise

Sept. 21, 2017

As part of High Level Panel on Water (HLPW)’s campaign for valuing water, the video was shown to a few heads of state at the UN General Assembly 2017 in New York, calling for a fundamental shift in the way the world looks at water.

Image

Beyond Scarcity: Water Security in the Middle East and North Africa

Aug. 29, 2017

The report draws on regional and global examples to show that limited water resources need not restrict the region’s future, but that a combination of technology, policy and management can convert scarcity into security.

Image

The Rising Tide: A New Look at Water and Gender

Aug. 29, 2017

The report shows how water often reflects, and even reinforces, gender inequality examining how norms and practices related to water often exacerbate ingrained gender and other hierarchies.

Image

Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Poverty Diagnostic Initiative

Aug. 28, 2017

This initiative – which encompasses 18 countries ranging from fragile and conflict-affected states to middle-income countries – undertook multidisciplinary research and developed in­novative methods to fully appreciate the impacts of inadequate services on human development outcomes and identify the binding constraints to service delivery. 

Image

2017 World Water Week

August 27-September 01, 2017

World Water Week in Stockholm is the annual focal point for the globe’s water issues. People from around the world come to Stockholm to network, exchange ideas, foster new thinking, and develop solutions to the most pressing water-related challenges of today. The World Bank Group has convened and participated in over 30 sessions of 2017 World Water Week.

 

Image

Thirsty Energy: Water-Smart Energy Planning in South Africa

June 15, 2017

As part of the Thirsty Energy Initiative to incorporate water constraints into its energy-planning model and foster a more sustainable system, the report “Modeling the Water–Energy Nexus: How Do Water Constraints Affect Energy Planning in South Africa?” finds that accounting for the regional vari­ability of water supply (and the associated costs of water supply infrastructure) can significantly impact energy planning, especially in a water-scarce country like South Africa.

Image

Water-Scarce Cities Initiative

May 15, 2017

Water scarce cities around the world, in both high income and developing countries, are undertaking a paradigm shift in how policy, technology, and management systems are applied to improve financial and ecological sustainability and social equity. The Water Scarce Cities (WSC) Initiative brings together practitioners to learn from each other and accelerate the adoption of this new paradigm in all of the water stressed regions of the world.

Image

2017 Sanitation and Water for All (SWA) High-level Meetings - Finance Ministers’ Meeting

Apr. 20, 2017

The 2017 SWA High-level Meetings (HLMs), which took place in Washington D.C. on 20 April during World Bank-IMF Spring Meetings, included a Finance Ministers’ Meeting (FMM) convened by the World Bank on behalf of the SWA partnership, and a Sector Ministers’ Meeting convened by UNICEF, including ministers responsible for water, sanitation, and hygiene. Countries and partners discussed national plans to meet the challenges of the water, sanitation and hygiene-related SDG targets and required resources. 

Image

Turbulent Waters: Pursuing Water Security in Fragile Contexts

Apr. 18, 2017

The report finds that when water insecurity repeatedly affects populations, it can act as a risk multiplier, fueling the perception that institutions and governments are ‘not doing enough’, exacerbating existing grievances, creating new risks, and deepening inequities. In turn, this contributes to destabilizing already fragile contexts, aggravating the challenges of water management, and perpetuating a vicious cycle of water insecurity and fragility.

Image

Performance of Water Utilities in Africa

Mar. 21, 2017

The report finds that many water utilities in Africa are working hard to expand access, but most haven’t kept up with the growing demand or the maintenance on aging infrastructure. This has left only one third of urban residents with piped water to their homes. Increasing access to a safe water supply will require more investment in utility infrastructure, while improving the capacity to operate and maintain services.

Image

Solar Water Pumping for Sustainable Water Supply

Jan. 1, 2016

Even though solar water pumping is ready for mainstreaming and has started to take off in some parts of the world, its benefits remain largely unknown to communities, governments, and development institutions. To address this knowledge gap, the World Bank has developed an accessible and interactive Knowledge Base on Solar Water Pumping, aiming to raise awareness about the technology and provide resources that help incorporate it into operations.

Image

Water Project Results 

Updated every month

The World Bank’s water portfolio currently covers 175 projects worth US$27 billion in lending and technical expertise. In the "Project of the Month" series, we feature the results achieved by these projects and showcase how the World Bank works with countries to address challenges and deliver solutions on the ground.

 

Image

2018 Water Cartoon Calendar

Dec. 14, 2017

Under the auspices of Global Water Security and Sanitation Partnership (GWSP), the Water Cartoon Calendar has carried on the tradition of raising awareness around critical global water issues through humor. 

Image

Citywide Inclusive Sanitation Initiative

Nov. 19, 2017

Citywide Inclusive Sanitation means that everybody benefits from adequate sanitation, with human waste being safely managed at every point along the service chain. The cities show-cased in these videos each demonstrate experiences that have embraced such approaches to ensuring the poor are provided with sanitation services.

Image

Aggregation of Water Supply and Sanitation Utilities

Nov.14, 2017

Water Supply and Sanitation utilities work together, or “aggregate”, when multiple municipalities unite under a single administrative structure. The World Bank’s Water Global Practice launched a toolkit and background report which explore why, when and how water utilities can work together to provide better services.

Image

Uncharted Waters: The New Economics of Water Scarcity and Variability

Oct. 24, 2017

The report looks at how the increasing number of droughts and floods impact farms, firms, and families in ways that are far costlier and longer lasting than known before. 

Image

Water’s Promise

Sept. 21, 2017

As part of High Level Panel on Water (HLPW)’s campaign for valuing water, the video was shown to a few heads of state at the UN General Assembly 2017 in New York, calling for a fundamental shift in the way the world looks at water.

Image

Beyond Scarcity: Water Security in the Middle East and North Africa

Aug. 29, 2017

The report draws on regional and global examples to show that limited water resources need not restrict the region’s future, but that a combination of technology, policy and management can convert scarcity into security.

Image

The Rising Tide: A New Look at Water and Gender

Aug. 29, 2017

The report shows how water often reflects, and even reinforces, gender inequality examining how norms and practices related to water often exacerbate ingrained gender and other hierarchies.

Image

Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Poverty Diagnostic Initiative

Aug. 28, 2017

This initiative – which encompasses 18 countries ranging from fragile and conflict-affected states to middle-income countries – undertook multidisciplinary research and developed in­novative methods to fully appreciate the impacts of inadequate services on human development outcomes and identify the binding constraints to service delivery. 

Image

2017 World Water Week

August 27-September 01, 2017

World Water Week in Stockholm is the annual focal point for the globe’s water issues. People from around the world come to Stockholm to network, exchange ideas, foster new thinking, and develop solutions to the most pressing water-related challenges of today. The World Bank Group has convened and participated in over 30 sessions of 2017 World Water Week.

 

Image

Thirsty Energy: Water-Smart Energy Planning in South Africa

June 15, 2017

As part of the Thirsty Energy Initiative to incorporate water constraints into its energy-planning model and foster a more sustainable system, the report “Modeling the Water–Energy Nexus: How Do Water Constraints Affect Energy Planning in South Africa?” finds that accounting for the regional vari­ability of water supply (and the associated costs of water supply infrastructure) can significantly impact energy planning, especially in a water-scarce country like South Africa.

Image

Water-Scarce Cities Initiative

May 15, 2017

Water scarce cities around the world, in both high income and developing countries, are undertaking a paradigm shift in how policy, technology, and management systems are applied to improve financial and ecological sustainability and social equity. The Water Scarce Cities (WSC) Initiative brings together practitioners to learn from each other and accelerate the adoption of this new paradigm in all of the water stressed regions of the world.

Image

2017 Sanitation and Water for All (SWA) High-level Meetings - Finance Ministers’ Meeting

Apr. 20, 2017

The 2017 SWA High-level Meetings (HLMs), which took place in Washington D.C. on 20 April during World Bank-IMF Spring Meetings, included a Finance Ministers’ Meeting (FMM) convened by the World Bank on behalf of the SWA partnership, and a Sector Ministers’ Meeting convened by UNICEF, including ministers responsible for water, sanitation, and hygiene. Countries and partners discussed national plans to meet the challenges of the water, sanitation and hygiene-related SDG targets and required resources. 

Image

Turbulent Waters: Pursuing Water Security in Fragile Contexts

Apr. 18, 2017

The report finds that when water insecurity repeatedly affects populations, it can act as a risk multiplier, fueling the perception that institutions and governments are ‘not doing enough’, exacerbating existing grievances, creating new risks, and deepening inequities. In turn, this contributes to destabilizing already fragile contexts, aggravating the challenges of water management, and perpetuating a vicious cycle of water insecurity and fragility.

Image

Performance of Water Utilities in Africa

Mar. 21, 2017

The report finds that many water utilities in Africa are working hard to expand access, but most haven’t kept up with the growing demand or the maintenance on aging infrastructure. This has left only one third of urban residents with piped water to their homes. Increasing access to a safe water supply will require more investment in utility infrastructure, while improving the capacity to operate and maintain services.

Image

Solar Water Pumping for Sustainable Water Supply

Jan. 1, 2016

Even though solar water pumping is ready for mainstreaming and has started to take off in some parts of the world, its benefits remain largely unknown to communities, governments, and development institutions. To address this knowledge gap, the World Bank has developed an accessible and interactive Knowledge Base on Solar Water Pumping, aiming to raise awareness about the technology and provide resources that help incorporate it into operations.

Image

Water Project Results 

Updated every month

The World Bank’s water portfolio currently covers 175 projects worth US$27 billion in lending and technical expertise. In the "Project of the Month" series, we feature the results achieved by these projects and showcase how the World Bank works with countries to address challenges and deliver solutions on the ground.

 

Image

2018 Water Cartoon Calendar

Dec. 14, 2017

Under the auspices of Global Water Security and Sanitation Partnership (GWSP), the Water Cartoon Calendar has carried on the tradition of raising awareness around critical global water issues through humor. 

Image

Citywide Inclusive Sanitation Initiative

Nov. 19, 2017

Citywide Inclusive Sanitation means that everybody benefits from adequate sanitation, with human waste being safely managed at every point along the service chain. The cities show-cased in these videos each demonstrate experiences that have embraced such approaches to ensuring the poor are provided with sanitation services.

Image

Aggregation of Water Supply and Sanitation Utilities

Nov.14, 2017

Water Supply and Sanitation utilities work together, or “aggregate”, when multiple municipalities unite under a single administrative structure. The World Bank’s Water Global Practice launched a toolkit and background report which explore why, when and how water utilities can work together to provide better services.

Image

Uncharted Waters: The New Economics of Water Scarcity and Variability

Oct. 24, 2017

The report looks at how the increasing number of droughts and floods impact farms, firms, and families in ways that are far costlier and longer lasting than known before. 

Image

Water’s Promise

Sept. 21, 2017

As part of High Level Panel on Water (HLPW)’s campaign for valuing water, the video was shown to a few heads of state at the UN General Assembly 2017 in New York, calling for a fundamental shift in the way the world looks at water.

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Beyond Scarcity: Water Security in the Middle East and North Africa

Aug. 29, 2017

The report draws on regional and global examples to show that limited water resources need not restrict the region’s future, but that a combination of technology, policy and management can convert scarcity into security.

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The Rising Tide: A New Look at Water and Gender

Aug. 29, 2017

The report shows how water often reflects, and even reinforces, gender inequality examining how norms and practices related to water often exacerbate ingrained gender and other hierarchies.

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Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Poverty Diagnostic Initiative

Aug. 28, 2017

This initiative – which encompasses 18 countries ranging from fragile and conflict-affected states to middle-income countries – undertook multidisciplinary research and developed in­novative methods to fully appreciate the impacts of inadequate services on human development outcomes and identify the binding constraints to service delivery. 

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2017 World Water Week

August 27-September 01, 2017

World Water Week in Stockholm is the annual focal point for the globe’s water issues. People from around the world come to Stockholm to network, exchange ideas, foster new thinking, and develop solutions to the most pressing water-related challenges of today. The World Bank Group has convened and participated in over 30 sessions of 2017 World Water Week.

 

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Thirsty Energy: Water-Smart Energy Planning in South Africa

June 15, 2017

As part of the Thirsty Energy Initiative to incorporate water constraints into its energy-planning model and foster a more sustainable system, the report “Modeling the Water–Energy Nexus: How Do Water Constraints Affect Energy Planning in South Africa?” finds that accounting for the regional vari­ability of water supply (and the associated costs of water supply infrastructure) can significantly impact energy planning, especially in a water-scarce country like South Africa.

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Water-Scarce Cities Initiative

May 15, 2017

Water scarce cities around the world, in both high income and developing countries, are undertaking a paradigm shift in how policy, technology, and management systems are applied to improve financial and ecological sustainability and social equity. The Water Scarce Cities (WSC) Initiative brings together practitioners to learn from each other and accelerate the adoption of this new paradigm in all of the water stressed regions of the world.

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2017 Sanitation and Water for All (SWA) High-level Meetings - Finance Ministers’ Meeting

Apr. 20, 2017

The 2017 SWA High-level Meetings (HLMs), which took place in Washington D.C. on 20 April during World Bank-IMF Spring Meetings, included a Finance Ministers’ Meeting (FMM) convened by the World Bank on behalf of the SWA partnership, and a Sector Ministers’ Meeting convened by UNICEF, including ministers responsible for water, sanitation, and hygiene. Countries and partners discussed national plans to meet the challenges of the water, sanitation and hygiene-related SDG targets and required resources. 

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Turbulent Waters: Pursuing Water Security in Fragile Contexts

Apr. 18, 2017

The report finds that when water insecurity repeatedly affects populations, it can act as a risk multiplier, fueling the perception that institutions and governments are ‘not doing enough’, exacerbating existing grievances, creating new risks, and deepening inequities. In turn, this contributes to destabilizing already fragile contexts, aggravating the challenges of water management, and perpetuating a vicious cycle of water insecurity and fragility.

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Performance of Water Utilities in Africa

Mar. 21, 2017

The report finds that many water utilities in Africa are working hard to expand access, but most haven’t kept up with the growing demand or the maintenance on aging infrastructure. This has left only one third of urban residents with piped water to their homes. Increasing access to a safe water supply will require more investment in utility infrastructure, while improving the capacity to operate and maintain services.

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Solar Water Pumping for Sustainable Water Supply

Jan. 1, 2016

Even though solar water pumping is ready for mainstreaming and has started to take off in some parts of the world, its benefits remain largely unknown to communities, governments, and development institutions. To address this knowledge gap, the World Bank has developed an accessible and interactive Knowledge Base on Solar Water Pumping, aiming to raise awareness about the technology and provide resources that help incorporate it into operations.

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About the Partnership
The GWSP supports client governments to achieve the water-related Sustainable Development Goals through the generation of innovative global knowledge and the provision of country-level support.



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Contact GWSP
Program Manager
Joel Kolker
Water Global Practice, The World Bank, 1818 H Street NW, Washington D.C. 20433, USA
Tel : +1 (202) 473 4229
Email