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BBL - How well are students prepared for study, work, and life in a digital world? Evidence from ICILS, a cross‐national study

How well are students prepared for study, work, and life in a digital world?
Evidence from ICILS, a cross‐national study

Nov. 6, 2019 (Wed) | 12:30 - 2:00 pm | Room J 9-044 | 701 18th St. NW, Washington, DC 

Presenter:
Julian Fraillon, Study director for IEA’s International Computer and Information Literacy Study (ICILS)

Chair:
Cristobal Cobo, Sr. Education Specialist, Education Global Practice, World Bank

 
Over the past four decades, information and computer technology has had profound impact on our daily lives, work, and social interactions. The International Computer and Information Literacy Study (ICILS) lead by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) deals with the core knowledge, skills and understanding students need to succeed in this dynamic information environment. 

Following on from the first cycle in 2013, ICILS 2018 assesses grade 8 students’ computer and information literacy, and computational thinking skills, in order to answer the critical question: how well are students prepared for study, work, and life in a digital world?

ICILS 2018, has seen more than 46,000 students and 26,000 teachers from twelve countries, and two benchmarking educational systems, take part. The study has also gathered valuable background information about students’ and teachers’ use of, and attitudes towards, technology. 

Through participating in ICILS, countries and education systems are provided with reliable, comparable data about young people’s development of 21st-century computer and information literacy (CIL) skills. On top of this, ICILS is unique in directly assessing computational thinking skills of students. 

The 2013 cycle of ICILS exposed the myth of the “digital native”; the assumption that just because young people have grown up surrounded by digital technology, they have acquired excellent ICT skills. The study showed that, while the vast majority of students reached the minimum level of knowledge of basic software, just 2% achieved the highest level through demonstrating an ability to apply critical thinking skills while searching for information online.

The ICILS study director, Julian Fraillon, of the Australian Council of Educational Research, will present the key findings from the 2018 study, and explain the relevance not just for the countries that took part, but for educators and policy makers worldwide.

About the presenter:
Julian Fraillon is Research Director of the Assessment and Reporting (Mathematics and Science) research program for ACER Group. Julian has directed a range of large-scale assessment projects with a focus on digital literacy and civics and citizenship education. He is currently director of the International Computer and Information Literacy Study 2018 (ICILS 2018), and he was the inaugural director of ICILS 2013. Julian has also directed ACER’s work across four cycles of the Australian National Assessment Program sample assessments of NAP ICT Literacy and NAP Civics and Citizenship commissioned by the Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority.

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