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BRIEF

BBL: Frontier activities exploring the use of digital technologies to improve education in developing countries: Highlights from research by the Digital Learning for Development (DL4D) research network

Frontier activities exploring the use of digital technologies to improve education in developing countries:
Highlights from research by the Digital Learning for Development (DL4D) research network

May 22, 2018 | 12:30PM - 2:00PM (EST) | Room  J 7-044 | 701 18th St NW, Washington, DC

Speakers:
Vicki Tinio, Executive Director, Foundation for Information Technology Education and Development (FIT-ED) of the Philippines & Network Hub Manager, Digital Learning for Development (DL4D) research network

Cher Ping Lim, Professor, University of Hong Kong & Principal Investigator Digital Learning for Development (DL4D) research network
Matthew Smith, Senior Programme Officer, IDRC & Project Coordinator, Digital Learning for Development (DL4D) research network

Chair:
Mike Trucano, Global Lead, Technology & Innovation in Education, The World Bank

 

What's happening at the frontier of activities exploring the use of digital technologies to improve education in developing countries?

This is a question that animates the work of Digital Learning for Development (DL4D), a global research network that aims to improve educational systems in developing countries through expanding understanding about digital learning, fostering collaboration on research, testing digital learning innovations, and scaling proven ones.

Game-based learning. Using technology to promote literacy. Learning analytics. Teacher Professional Development at Scale. These are just some of the research themes being explored by members of the DL4D research network.

Please join us for a fascinating and informal discussion highlighting findings from DL4D's ongoing research activities, and for a sneak peek at what is coming next!

Phase 1 on this research effort is testing digital learning innovations, and scaling proven ones, especially in Asia, in order to better understand how digital learning innovations contribute to improved educational equity, quality and efficiency in developing countries.

Phase II focuses on new, technology-enabled approaches to teacher professional development at scale (TPD@Scale). 

Recent publications from DLD include:

  • a Guide to Developing Digital Games for Early Grade Literacy for Developing Countries;
  • an impact and technical evaluation of the winners of the EduApp4Syria competition, which challenged firms to develop open source smartphone learning games that build basic literacy skills in Arabic and improve the psychosocial well-being of Syrian refugee children; and 
  • a primer on Learning Analytics for the Global South.

DL4D is jointly funded by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) of Canada and the Department for International Development (DFID) of the United Kingdom, and administered by the Foundation for Information Technology Education and Development (FIT-ED) of the Philippines.

For more information about DL4D, and to download copies of DL4D research reports, visit the project web site at http://dl4d.org/.

About the speakers:

Victoria L. Tinio is the Executive Director of the Foundation for Information Technology Education and Development (FIT-ED). For the past 16 years, Vicki has been involved in the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of a wide range of digital learning programs and projects in schools and alternative learning environments in the Philippines and across Asia.

LIM Cher Ping is a Professor of Curriculum and Innovations at the Education University of Hong Kong and is the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Internet and Higher Education. He was a Professor of Education, Director of International Partnerships, and Director of the Asia-Pacific Centre of Excellence for Teacher Education and Innovations in Western Australia before moving to Hong Kong in July 2010. Over the past two decades, Chirp has engaged with major education stakeholders at the national and international levels – UNESCO, Asian Development Bank, Microsoft, World Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, Sampoerna Foundation, and various national and local government agencies, among others – as his research and development partners.

Matthew Smith is a Senior Program Officer at Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC) where he oversees research on how information networks can be used to promote open, inclusive and rights based information societies in the south. Before joining IDRC in 2008, Smith completed postgraduate research on the interaction between technology and society, in particular the impact of e-government systems on citizens’ trust in the government Chile. He has published on this subject and others, including the role of openness to broaden access and inclusion. Smith holds a Ph.D. in information systems and an M.Sc. in development studies from the London School of Economics and Political Science, as well as an M.Sc. in artificial intelligence from the University of Edinburgh.