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2015 World Water Week
August 23-28, 2015Stockholm, Sweden

World Water Week in Stockholm, organized by SIWI, is the annual focal point for global water issues. The 2015 theme is Water for Development. Experts, practitioners, decision-makers, business innovators and young professionals from a range of sectors and countries will meet to network, exchange ideas, foster new thinking and develop solutions to the most pressing water-related challenges of today. 

The World Bank Group will convene and participate in several sessions, which are listed on the "Sessions" tab. You can also follow along via Twitter using #wwweek.

 

Related links:

YouTube Playlist: World Water Week 2015

Blog: Building urban sewerage infrastructure – but where is the sewage?

Blog: Moving toward universal, quality water and sanitation services

Blog: How can we ensure that we build water and climate resilient cities?

Blog: The case for solar water pumps

Blog: Water: At a tipping point

Conference Edition: A Water-Secure World for All. Water for Development: Responding to the Challenges

Livestream: August 23, 16.00-17.30
Impact of subsidies on efficient water technology uptake within agriculture

Livestream: August 25, 16:00-17:30
LAC Focus: Achieving the SDG for Water in Latin America

Livestream: August 26, 14:00-15:30
High Level Panel: Raising the Profile of Water Towards COP21

 

Last Updated: Aug 25, 2015

The full program is available here.

Below are a list of World Bank Group (co)-convened sessions and sessions with World Bank Group participating speakers.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 23 

Water Integrity Global Outlook 2015
Event: 9:00am – 10:30am, NL 357
Convenor(s): Cap-Net UNDP
Co-convenor(s): Global Water Partnership; International Water Management Institute; Stockholm International Water Institute; UNDP Water Governance Facility at SIWI and Water Integrity Network

The Water Integrity Network (WIN) and its members and partners will publish the Water Integrity Global Outlook 2015 later this year as successor to the Global Corruption Report 2008 on water. The discussion will offer the opportunity for contributors, external references and participants to share and reflect on the main conclusions of the Global Outlook, including the challenges faced, such as engaging all who are needed for this battle.
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Towards sustainable water services by 2025
Event: 09:00am-10:30am, NL Pillar Hall / Pelarsalen
Convenor(s): African Development Bank; Global Water Operators' Partnerships Alliance at UN-Habitat ; International Water Association; UNESCO – Institute for Water Education and Vitens Evides International

Sustainability of water services is increasingly taking centre stage in global discussions on green utilities. In this session we examine the different dimensions of water utility sustainability. First, utilities need to be able to manage and adapt to risks and threats facing the water resources used by the utility. Increasing urbanization, environmental pollution and climate change already to great extend impact the quality, the quantity and the price of available water resources and thus the utility's ability to provide reliable services. Secondly, sustainability implies a governance framework that allows the organization to operate autonomously and incorporate long-term time horizon for investment and management decisions. Thirdly, sustainability incorporates a financial dimension as capital investment and operation and maintenance costs for service provisioning are substantial. Sustainable utilities need to recover costs. Fourthly, sustainability encompasses an infrastructural dimension as water infrastructure lies at the very heart of water provisioning. This infrastructure needs to be adequately maintained and managed. The way these strongly interrelated. dimensions are addressed form the basis for the development of mature water utilities.
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Sustainable cities: A pipe dream or realistic future? (Part 1) 
Workshop: 11:00am – 12:30pm,  FH 202
Convenor(s): Global Water Operators' Partnerships Alliance at UN-Habitat 
Co-convenor(s): Global Water Partnership; Stockholm International Water Institute; The World Bank Group and United Nations Office for Sustainable Development

This first technical session will start with an overall introduction to the integrated approach to urban water and wastewater management and show how it can contribute to improved service delivery, cost efficiency, social equity and environmental sustainability.

The keynote speech will focus on urban wastewater and sanitation management seen with an integrated perspective, and short oral presentations will describe various city-wide, private and community experiences in managing sanitation.

The session will then benefit from a panel discussion involving the various speakers and the audience.
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Sustainable cities: A pipe dream or realistic future? (Part 2) 
Side Event: 2:00pm – 3:30pm,  FH 202
Convenor(s): Global Water Operators' Partnerships Alliance at UN-Habitat
Co-convenor(s): Global Water Partnership; Stockholm International Water Institute; The World Bank Group and United Nations Office for Sustainable Development

This second technical session will focus on showing that wastewater is not wasted water and that wastewater and sanitation are a resource.

The keynote speech will provide arguments for this new approach that will be further detailed through examples of decentralized systems, the use of constructed wetlands, the safe recycling of human waste for agriculture, and the reuse of wastewater. The audience will be able to voice their opinion and comments through a dynamic buzz session.
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Sustainable cities: A pipe dream or realistic future? (Part 3) 
Side Event: 4:00pm – 5:30pm,  NL 357
Convenor(s): Global Water Operators' Partnerships Alliance at UN-Habitat
Co-convenor(s): Global Water Partnership; Stockholm International Water Institute; The World Bank Group and United Nations Office for Sustainable Development

Urban water security is under stress in many countries, due to rapid urban demographic growth, increased pressure on water resources, poor wastewater management, climate change impact, and inefficient urban planning.

The proposal of this workshop is to introduce an integrated approach to tackle the challenge of urban water security, but there are many hurdles to overcome including institutional ones. What is the way forward ? This will be the main question that three eminent keynote speakers will try to respond to in this last high-level session, which will be completed by a panel that will provide more agumentation and allow interaction with the audience.
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Impact of subsidies on efficient water technology uptake within agriculture 
Side Event: 4:00pm – 5:30pm,  FH Little Theatre
Convenor(s): The World Bank Group

The seminar will take the format of several short presentations based in case studies of subsidies in developing markets, followed by a roundtable discussion with the audience.  The event will allow participants to evaluate differing perspectives and experiences regarding the use of subsidies to create uptake, market acceptance and sustainable impact of new technologies for water access and household livelihoods.  The initial presentation will assess private sector perspectives on the impact of subsidies for equipment to access and distribute irrigation water in India, Morocco, Burkina Faso and Zambia and will be presented by IFC.  The second presentation will be made by ICARDA based on an assessment of the feasibility of solar energy as primary power source to pump irrigation water in Morocco. This assesses the implications of switching from the ongoing use of subsidized butane gas to solar energy, the anticipated impact on the government’s budget, feasibility of initial capital subsidy for solar panels, and emissions of petroleum-based pollutants on the environment from solar energy vis-à-vis LPG.  Further discussion of the wider implications for domestic water access and muti-use systems will also be part of this event.
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MONDAY, AUGUST 24

Governing the water-energy nexus: New intergrated management practices 
Seminar: 4:00pm – 5:30pm, NL 357
Convenor(s): Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies
Co-convenor(s): International Renewable Energy Agency and The World Bank Group

Climate change poses fundamental questions about current practices in the use of water and energy resources. Decarbonizing the energy system must go hand in hand with measures to increase water and energy security for a growing population. While water and energy resources are often managed separately, there is growing awareness of the benefits of integrating governance approaches in the two sectors – and of the risks of failing to do so.

Building on their joint event at the 2014 World Water Week, the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies, the International Renewable Energy Agency and the World Bank’s Thirsty Energy Program will co-host a panel discussion on emerging approaches to governing the water-energy nexus and their role in building more resilient and climate-friendly infrastructure systems. Based on best practices from the field, participants will consider the role of integrated planning and modelling approaches in identifying key trade-offs and synergies when investing in the two sectors. In addition to presenting results of integrated modelling for South Africa, the panelists will discuss new insights on the potential of renewable energy solutions.
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Women for water. Every woman counts.
Seminar: 4:00pm – 5:30pm, FH 300
Convenor(s): Unilever

An interactive discussion to explore how, together, we can identify and advance the solutions that will enhance women’s empowerment by reclaiming time currently lost to poor water access.
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TUESDAY, AUGUST 25

Livable Cities for All: Integrated Sanitation and Water Services  
Seminar – 9:00am – 10:30am, FH Congress Hall A
Convenor(s): Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Co-convenor(s): Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology; The World Bank Group and Water and Sanitation Program

The sanitation and water needs of poor residents in informal settlements in cities and towns are typically not served by utilities’ whose services are usually designed for formal settlements.  In informal settlements, large numbers of people are denied access to services because they cannot attain legal tenure, often a requirement for being connected to municipal services. Without formal planning, challenging land conditions (e.g. high groundwater, rocky, swampy etc.) also limit access and increase the cost of services.

The seminar will discuss how citywide planning and integrated urban services approaches enable delivery of safe, sustainable and affordable on-site sanitation and fecal sludge management (FSM) services, and of universal piped water. Recent research and practical case studies from Uganda, Burkina Faso, Senegal, India and Vietnam will raise controversies and common trends on new approaches and the roles of utilities, municipalities, community-based organizations and the private sector in these services.  New knowledge presented will include recently developed diagnostic tools and guidelines on city-wide sustainable urban sanitation services to the poor (especially FSM); and the role of utilities in sewered and non-sewered sanitation; and findings from new research on when and how utilities could be effective institutions for serving the poor.
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Using results-based financing to connect the poor: Who, where ,why?
9:00am – 10:30am, FH 202
Convenor(s):Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Global Partnership on Output-Based Aid

The event will showcase RBF/OBA as an innovative financing mechanism to help water development practitioners target the poor. It will address two of the major challenges highlighted in the themes of this year’s forum; 1) extending water services to the poorest of the poor and other disadvantaged groups and 2) leveraging partnership among important stakeholders, including governments, public and private utilities, NGOs, communities and commercial lenders.

A comprehensive look at World Bank Group water sector projects shows that RBF/OBA can be implemented by wide range of actors, including public or private utilities, NGOs, or community organizations, and can leverage partnerships with commercial lenders to bridge financing gaps. RBF/OBA can extend water services to the poor and disadvantaged by providing the right incentives to service providers, leverage partnerships among various stakeholders, encourage transparency, and ensure payments are only made after results (water outputs) have been achieved.

By the end of the event, audience members will have a better understanding the “who, where and why” of RBF/OBA, for the purpose of identifying where RBF/OBA works best in water projects. The event will also help practitioners establish potential areas of collaboration and gain valuable advice on the conditions conducive to success.
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Don’t cheat on us: Gender dimensions in Water Corruption
11:00 – 12:30pm, FH202
Convenor(s): Bremen Overseas Research & Development Association
Co-convenor(s): Stockholm International Water Institute and Women for Water Partnership

Women and men’s unequal access to and control over resources, development benefits and decision-making related to water is widely recognised. Despite their important role in water management, women are often underrepresented in decision making related to water management and services – partly as a result of social and cultural norms.

Less known, is that women also are unequally affected by corruption – a vice which continues to plague the water sector. Corruption impacts women more severely than men due to their dependence on basic services, such as water, and their disadvantaged position in society. Women tend to have a wider definition than men of what corruption entails, for example by including sexual exploitation, physical abuse and non-delivery of public services.

At the same time, women’s civil society has an impressive track record of curbing and preventing corruption when actively engaged in water related interventions in their communities.

This event will explore the gendered dimensions of corruption in the water sector by showcasing the latest research and examples of women’s strategies to combat corruption in different parts of the world. Recommendations on how to integrate a gender perspective in water integrity will be developed with the participants during the event.
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Managing change: Strengthening resilience to climate and Disaster Risks
11:00am – 12:30pm,
Convenor(s): CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security; Rockefeller Foundation; Stockholm International Water Institute and UNESCO – Institute for Water Education

The combined effects of unresolved poverty and unsustainable development together with a changing climate contribute to persistent and increasing disaster risk. Key development drivers include population growth, rapid urbanisation, increasing demands for energy and food, and increasing industrialisation. As disaster impacts are often manifested through flooding or drought, water management, in synergy with other policy areas, plays an important role in building resilience. Important milestones in global policy-making will occur in 2015, including decisions on sustainable development goals, climate change and disaster management. Strengthening and maintaining resilience to climate and disaster risks is vital for sustainable development and this must progress from concept to practice. How policy can effectively bridge this gap is an important question. Building resilience in the face of global challenges urgently needs better integration between efforts addressing development objectives, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and disaster risk reduction and management in the Post-2015 development agenda.
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Achieving the new dedicated goal for water: Challenges for LAC
4:00pm – 5:30pm,

Convenor(s): Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean; FEMSA Foundation; Fundación Chile; Inter-American Development Bank; International Water Association; One Drop; The World Bank Group and UN-Water

2015 is the target year for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). From 1990 to 2014, more than 200 million people gained access to safe water and sanitation in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). However, more than 30 million and 120 million still lack access to these basic services respectively. In 2015, the challenge for the region is to undertake and pursue a new set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Water is central to this challenge. A dedicated global goal on water has been established: Ensure availability and  sustainable management of water and sanitation for all (Goal #6). This goal includes a set of proposed targets, to be achieved by 2030, that reflects the importance of water for humans, the environment, and the economy. This new set of targets triggers a service universalization challenge, but goes beyond access and emphasizes the importance of guaranteeing service quality, sound wastewater management, and adequate governance. The Post-2015 development agenda is now entering a final phase. It is time to discuss how LAC will effectively implement, measure and monitor these new dedicated goal and targets.
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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26

Water as a driver for sustainable development and poverty eradication (Part 1)
Seminar: 9:00am – 10:30am, 
Convenor(s): Stockholm International Water Institute
Co-convenor(s): The World Bank Group; WaterAid and We Effect

Water is an integral part of a society’s development and a backbone for human health and dignity, livelihoods and poverty reduction. The human right to access to clean water – the need for all people to be able to enjoy adequate water and sanitation services – is well established internationally. Water is also an economic good and as such a driver for economic growth and development. The question is: how will a rights-based approach to water be implemented? Still, we often fail to address some of the core issues of equitability and asymmetries in power between the haves and the have nots. This is true between nations sharing water, between different users of water, and in communities. How can we work towards a future of more inclusive, just and equitable development, making sure we do not leave the poorest and the hardest to reach behind?
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Earth Observation supporting water resources management for sustainable development
Seminar: 9:00am – 10:30am, 
Convenor(s): European Space Agency and The World Bank Group

The seminar will demonstrate the application and benefits of Earth Observation (EO) information derived from satellites supporting governments, intergovernmental bodies, the private sector, and major water using sectors in water resources management. EO is capable to provide timely, consistent and independent information on water resources at basin scale to manage and serve efficiently agricultural, industrial and fresh water needs.

The seminar builds on the collaboration between the TIGER initiative of the European Space Agency and the Water Partnership Program (WPP) of the World Bank Group on introducing EO technology at national and river basin authorities in developing countries. Practical showcases at local to transboundary scale in Africa will illustrate how EO can help fill the wide spread information gap related to water resource management such as monitoring of fresh water quality and availability, urban and agricultural water demand modeling, hydrological modeling and flood mapping/forecasting. A World Bank publication will be introduced on best practices for a range of EO water applications and related aspects such as validation and accuracy of the derived information products. Finally existing free EO data sources, open source tools and training material relevant for capacity development of water authorities will be shared with the audience.
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Stockholm Water Prize Seminar: Rainwater-Sky’s the limit
Seminar: 9:00am – 12:30am, 
Convenor(s): Royal Swedish Academy of Science and Stockholm International Water Institute

Celebrating its 25th year, Stockholm Water Prize is the world’s most prominent award for outstanding water achievements.

Water is undoubtedly one of the most precious productive resources on our planet. It is by necessity used on a daily basis by everyone for almost everything. Even if many of us don’t use more than around 100 liters directly, enormous amounts of water is embedded in the goods and services that nourish, maintain and entertain us. Unfortunately, water is also one of the most destructive forces affecting our lives. Of the US$2.5 trillion in economic losses from disasters so far this century – 70% relate to floods and droughts. Billions of people across the globe have been killed or had their livelihoods destroyed by extreme water events. The double dividends of wise water management should be apparent to all.

Irrespective of increasing demand for and variability of water, the limits to our growth is ultimately set by water from the sky, the rain.

The Stockholm Water Prize seminar brings together Laureates and other influential scientists and practitioners in a session that explores the opportunities and challenges for better management of rainwater for sustainable development.
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“UN-Water stakeholder dialogue: Way Forward in the sustainable development agenda”
Seminar: 9:00am – 10:30am, NL Auditorium / Aulan
Convenor(s): UN-Water

With an international consensus on the importance of water and sanitation for sustainable development, and with just a few weeks to go before the UN Summit in September in New York, UN-Water invites participants to a forward-looking dialogue on the how to realise the ambitious Post-2015 agenda for water and sanitation. The dialogue will start with a brief introduction to the Post-2015 process before it turns it focus to the means of implementation for Goal 6, i.e. exploring how the goal on water and sanitation can be reached. UN-Water will be in a position to share the latest news from the intergovernmental processes in New York including the outcomes from the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in Addis Ababa in July 2015. In the following panel debate, UN-Water Members and Partners, and other stakeholders, will share and discuss their views on the different aspects of Goal 6 means of implementation, highlighting opportunities and challenges. How will the water community work together to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all?
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Water as a driver for sustainable development and poverty eradication (Part 2)
Seminar: 11:00am – 12:30pm, 
Convenor(s): Stockholm International Water Institute
Co-convenor(s): The World Bank Group; WaterAid and We Effect

Water is an integral part of a society’s development and a backbone for human health and dignity, livelihoods and poverty reduction. The human right to access to clean water – the need for all people to be able to enjoy adequate water and sanitation services – is well established internationally. Water is also an economic good and as such a driver for economic growth and development. The question is: how will a rights-based approach to water be implemented? Still, we often fail to address some of the core issues of equitability and asymmetries in power between the haves and the have nots. This is true between nations sharing water, between different users of water, and in communities. How can we work towards a future of more inclusive, just and equitable development, making sure we do not leave the poorest and the hardest to reach behind?
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#SIWISofa: Raising the Profile of Water Towards COP21
Special Event: 11:00am-11:30am, Exhibition Hall A
Convenor(s): Alliance for Global Water Adaptation

This talk will be held in connection to the High Level Panel on 26 August, 14:00-15:30. It will focus on the central role of water in achieving climate adaptation and mitigation, and on the historic opportunity offered by CoP21 to catalyse global leaders’ attention to this issue. Discussions in the past have mainly focused on the issue of mitigation; while this is clearly a worldwide priority, equally important is the issue of adaptation and the understanding of the impacts of climate change on water resources and key water dependent sectors of the economy. Torgny Holmgren, Executive Director at SIWI and Junaid Ahmad, Senior Director, Water, World Bank Group will reflect upon the necessary next steps toward COP21 and Paris in December.
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Financing for Development: Innovative Financial Mechanisms for the Post-2015 Agenda
Event: 11:00am-12:30pm, NL Pillar Hall / Pelarsalen
Convenor(s): African Ministers' Council On Water; Asian Development Bank; Global Water Partnership; Inter-American Development Bank and The World Bank Group

2015 is the target year for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). From 1990 to 2015, more than 2.3 billion people globally have gained access to improved water sources and about 2 billion to improved sanitation. However, more than 700 million people, mostly in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, still use unimproved drinking water sources; and some 2.5 billion people unimproved sanitation facilities. The challenge for developing countries is to close this access gap and create the enabling environment to attract public and private investment to the sector. Creating this enabling environment includes defining clear functions and responsibilities, promoting transparent governance structures, strengthen service providers, progressively implement regulatory regimes and tariffs, and guarantee equitable service provision for all consumers. Innovative finance can play a critical role in establishing this enabling environment and ultimately providing resources to close the access gap in the water sector. This session will discuss how to generate this enabling environment and target questions such as: What innovative financing mechanisms must be developed to achieve the water-related SDG? What are the existing strategies already addressing this issue? What can we learn from other sectors and regions?
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Making transformational gains for gender equality through WASH policy
Seminar: 11:00am – 12:30pm, FH Congress Hall A
Convenor(s): Asian Development Bank
Co-convenor(s): Department for International Development, UK; Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency; UN World Water Assessment Programme and Water Global Practice of the World Bank Group

This event will showcase policies, strategies and practices of select countries and development organizations aimed at enhancing gender equality in the WASH sector.  Both national and partner agency policy frameworks are critical for institutionalizing and sustaining gender equality in programs and projects on the ground.  Equally important is how policies are translated into practice, and the use of appropriate indicators to measure results.  The session will bring together key donors and country representatives to promote dialogue and learning on the following:

  • What is required to integrate gender into country WASH policies, strategies and practice to assure effective implementation?
  • What have development organizations’ learnt from implementing their gender policies and strategies, and how do they plan to strengthen gender equality in WASH during the SDGs?
  • How could countries and development agencies harmonize indicators for collection of sex disaggregated data to facilitate national and global monitoring?

The deliberations will promote understanding of what works and what does not in promoting gender equality through WASH. The groundwork for longer term partnership between sector agencies and client governments will be forged by discussing indicators in the sector, and strategies for narrowing the gap between policy and practice for enhanced impact and sustainability.
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Launch of SFD portal: SFD- a tool to foster sustainable urban sanitation programming
Seminar: 11:00am – 12:30pm, FH 202
Convenor(s): Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Co-convenor(s): Centre for Science and Environment; Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology; Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit; University of Leeds; Water and Sanitation Program and Water, Engineering and Development Centre of Loughborough University

This event introduces the “SFD Promotion Initiative”, the SFD web portal and main features of the approaches used to develop the SFDs. The “SFD Promotion Initiative“ promotes tools for faecal waste flow analysis to inform urban sanitation programming. These tools build on the service delivery assessment (SDA) and faecal waste flow diagrams (or Shit Flow Diagrams, SFDs) developed by WSP. The main objective of the Initiative is the development and rollout of SFDs, backed by a service delivery context analysis and information on data sources in the city concerned. The Initiative currently tests this approach in 50 cities worldwide and will disseminate the results via a web portal on the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) platform.

The 1.5-hour event comprises four 15-minute slots with presentations by project partners and 30 minutes of facilitated discussion in small groups on key aspects of the Initiative, with an opportunity to raise questions and gather feedback. The presentations will cover:

  • Introduction of the SFD Promotion Initiative and the SuSanA-SFD web portal
  • What are SFDs and what are they made for?
  • How to produce SFDs? Data collection and analysis
  • SFDs as advocacy and decision-support tool in India

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Water as a driver for sustainable development and poverty eradication (Part 3)
Seminar: 2:00pm – 3:30pm, FH 202
Convenor(s): Stockholm International Water Institute
Co-convenor(s): The World Bank Group; WaterAid and We Effect

Water is an integral part of a society’s development and a backbone for human health and dignity, livelihoods and poverty reduction. The human right to access to clean water – the need for all people to be able to enjoy adequate water and sanitation services – is well established internationally. Water is also an economic good and as such a driver for economic growth and development. The question is: how will a rights-based approach to water be implemented? Still, we often fail to address some of the core issues of equitability and asymmetries in power between the haves and the have nots. This is true between nations sharing water, between different users of water, and in communities. How can we work towards a future of more inclusive, just and equitable development, making sure we do not leave the poorest and the hardest to reach behind?
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Getting Water in COP21: The Economics of Water and Climate
Seminar: 2:00pm – 3:30pm, NL Auditorium / Aulan
Convenor(s): The World Bank Group

It is widely acknowledged that water is at the front lines of climate change. It is the primary channel through which the impacts of climate change will be felt across the key growth drivers of the global economy –agriculture, energy, industry, environment, and the urban sector. Despite this, the role of transmitting climate impacts to the rest of the economy, water has not been fully mainstreamed in the negotiations and has been marginally discussed in some UNFCCC related programs. Hence, important issues that are part of the mitigation agenda, for example plans for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions typically rest on the often optimistic assumptions of adequate water availability for cooling and hydropower generation. For years the water community have engaged in the COP debates in an attempt to get water properly embedded in the different processes. Some advances have been made but there is still a long road ahead. The objective of this event will be to organize a high level dialogue to present results of new work on the physical impacts of climate change in water resources and the impacts on regional and global economic growth, and to discuss a process to promote a collective agenda in COP21.
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Transforming the Sanitation Sector for Achieving universal access by 2030
Seminar: 4:00pm – 5:30pm, NL 357
Convenor(s): Water Global Practice of the World Bank Group and WaterAid

The session aims to bring together practitioners and thought leaders in the sanitation sector (both from the academia and from relevant sector institutions) to discuss the changes that the sanitation sector has to undergo in order to become fit for progressing effectively towards universal access by 2030, the target that will likely be set in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The session will start with a setting-the-scene presentation based on an expert consultation, where sanitation experts worldwide were interviewed to gather their perspective on the main blockages in the sanitation sector and the key priorities for the SDG period.

Building on that, there will be two presentations on innovative sanitation experiences that have attempted to address some of the blockages and priorities highlighted. The experiences presented –one urban and one rural– will discuss on their successes and challenges and the sector-wide lessons for the future.

The second half of the seminar will consist of a panel discussion reflecting on the presentations and the future priorities for the sanitation sector. The speakers will be joined in the panel by sanitation experts from key global institutions, who will respond to the comments and questions from the chair and the seminar participants.
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Sustainable City Sanitation- from planning to implementation
Seminar: 4:00pm – 5:30pm, NL Pillar Hall / Pelarsalen
Convenor(s): Eawag
Co-convenor(s): Sustainable Sanitation Alliance; Water and Sanitation for the Urban Poor and Water For People

This “open-fishbowl” conversation around cutting-edge city sanitation themes will feature three simultaneous audience-interactive conversations exploring exciting recent developments in urban sanitation.

Table 1 will examine what has been accomplished with city sanitation plans in India and Indonesia in the past 5 years. Are they ‘cornerstones for upgrading city sanitation services’, or just another failed attempt at top-down, expert-driven master planning? How can sanitation planning initiatives ensure dynamic involvement of the private sector?

Table 2 will debate Shit Flow Diagrams (SFD) as state-of-the-art visualization tools. An SFD is an advocacy, decision-making and monitoring tool that can be easily understood by non-technical  municipal stakeholders and by civil society. It therefore has the potential to shift the focus of attention, money and activities towards more inclusive urban sanitation and more efficient investments.

Table 3 will discuss the “excreta management ladder” concept which is based on two basic observations. First, urban sanitation improvements in the short to medium terms necessarily require city authorities to invest in support for non-networked sanitation (i.e. faecal sludge management). But second, most cities aspire in the longer term to city-wide sewerage. This table will consider how to integrate faecal sludge management with sewerage planning or alternative options.
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 27

Exploring urban sanitation at the nexus of government and enterprise
Seminar: 9:00am – 10:30am, FH 202
Convenor(s): United States Agency for International Development and Water and Sanitation for the Urban Poor

This event will be facilitated by USAID and WSUP. It will feature three 15 minute technical presentations, followed by a game that will encourage participants to explore the nexus between government and enterprise for improved urban sanitation service delivery. Participants will be presented with a hypothetical urban sanitation scenario, and will be asked to propose potential approaches to effectively engage the private sector and government stakeholders to reach desired service outcomes. Following the game, technical experts from USAID and WSUP will facilitate a participatory discussion. USAID and WSUP facilitators will synthesize points from the discussion, and will offer key concluding messages pertaining to the importance of private sector engagement and participation of state and local government stakeholders.
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Beyond the Basics-Next Generation Solutions for Rural Sanitation
Seminar: 11:00am – 12:30pm, 
Convenor(s): BRAC
Co-convenor(s): IRC; PSI - Population Services International; The World Bank Group and Water and Sanitation Program

An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that lack of access to rural sanitation has far reaching impacts, from ill-health, loss of productivity, and reduced school attainment to lower adult incomes.  Over the last decade, different innovative approaches to provide poor people with access to rural sanitation have emerged. Many have demonstrated results at scale with high rates of return on investment.   Despite some promising results, most basic sanitation services have largely failed to reach the poorest rural populations.  Moreover, rural sanitation has largely failed to integrate with other developmental sectors such as nutrition, livelihoods, inclusive finance, and social protection.  A next generation of solutions is emerging that is trying to tackle scale, equity, and ‘mainstreaming’ of solutions to ensure accelerated and sustained access to sanitation service for all.   The event brings together some of the most promising ‘next generation’ solutions to sanitation around themes such as integration into social protection programs, institutional strengthening of local government to implement large-scale rural sanitation programs, and market-based solutions for rural sanitation.  On the basis of a series of 3 cross cutting studies, the event will identify the potential for cross-learning and critical success factors which can be integrated into at-scale country programs.
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(Re)Thinking Governance
Seminar: 11:00am – 12:30pm, FH 307
Convenor(s): Robert B. Daugherty Water for Food Institute at the University of Nebraska
Co-convenor(s): Stockholm International Water Institute; UNDP Water Governance Facility at SIWI and Water Integrity Network

In an increasingly complex and interconnected world, water governance that is both equitable and efficient is not the result of governments alone. Instead, it derives from interactions between government and international policies, initiatives of economic players, as well as through civic knowledge and action. Governance of this plural and dynamic process must be socially fair, legally effective and institutionally transparent. From local to global levels, civil society stakeholders and the private sector must be heard and responded to in meaningful dialogues with government agencies. Furthermore, equitable and effective governance presumes accountability, access to information, and a new compact between development agencies and stakeholder entities.

Through three different sessions, which will contain presentations and interactive panel discussions, this workshop will explore various aspects of the nature of water governance for a viable post-2015 development agenda.
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Financing universal WASH coverage under the Sustainable Development Goals
Seminar: 2:00pm – 3:30pm, FH 202
Convenor(s): Department for International Development, UK;
Co-convenor(s): Ministry of Foreign Affairs, The Netherlands; The World Bank Group; United Nations Children’s Fund and World Health Organization

In September 2015 the UN General Assembly will meet to agree on the Sustainable Development Goals, which will include an expected target of universal use of drinking-water, sanitation and hygiene by 2030. Ultimately, the ability to meet this target depends on whether the financing can be raised to incentivize populations to change behavior as well as the hardware required to assure a sustainable and affordable service. Hence the costs of achieving and sustaining WASH services need to be understood, as well as the required investment phasing, the available financing sources, and the ability of financing instruments and mechanisms to achieve universal WASH use. The session will translate the Financing for Development conference in Ethiopia to the water sector, thus exploring existing and potential financing sources and mechanisms to close the financing gap, which players need to be involved or incentivized, what joint actions are needed to define and implement a financing roadmap, and what opportunities can be taken to utilize the various events and dialogues taking place during 2015 on the SDGs.
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The WaterCredit Model: Lessons and Opportunities for Scale and Impact
Seminar: 4:00pm – 5:30pm, FH Little Theatre
Convenor(s): PepsiCo
Co-convenor(s): Water.org

Water.org’s WaterCredit model represents the creation of a new space at the intersection of water, sanitation, and microfinance. The model empowers people to address their own water and sanitation needs by catalyzing small loans to people in developing countries who often lack access to traditional credit markets. To date, Water.org has catalyzed $97 million in capital, reaching more than two million people through 48 partners in nine countries. The WaterCredit model has grown rapidly, from 100,000 loans to more than 500,000 loans in the last two years.

With access to affordable financing, individuals and families can take out loans for water and sanitation improvements. This introductory, interactive session will explain the unique characteristics and mechanics of the WaterCredit model, share its results and lessons learned, and explore new approaches and channels for considering how we can work with others to reach millions more people with access to improved water and sanitation through innovative financing.

No single business, NGO or government can solve the global water crisis. However, each has a role to play. Water.org recognizes that collaboration, such as powerful partnerships with leading corporations like PepsiCo, is critical to advancing innovative solutions and progress.
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Last Updated: Aug 20, 2015

World Bank Water at a Glance

Booklet: A Water-Secure World for All. Water for Development: Responding to the Challenges (Conference Edition)
Info Sheet: About the World Bank Water Global Practice

Climate Resilience and Water

Brochure: A shared vision for the Cutzamala System – A Model Basin in Water management
Brochure: Dam Safety in Brazil: when engineering serves society
Brochure: Living with the Semi-arid and proactive drought management in northeast Brazil: a new perspective
Case Profile: Integrated Urban Water Management - Lessons and Recommendations from Regional Experiences in Latin America, Central Asia, and Africa
Info sheet: Thirsty Energy
Infographic: Thirsty Energy
Report: Developing business models for fecal sludge management in Maputo
Report: Leveraging Water Global Practice knowledge and lending: Improving services for the Nairobi water and sewerage utility to reach the urban poor in Kenya
Summary Note: Integrated Urban Water Management – LAC
Water Paper: Thirsty Energy

Transboundary Cooperation

Water Paper: Reaching Across the Waters: Facing the Risks of Cooperation in International Waters

Water and Gender

Working Paper: Mainstreaming Gender In Water And Sanitation

Finance in the Water and Sanitation Sector

Flagship Report: Running Water in India’s Cities: A Review of Five Recent Public-Private Partnership Initiatives
Report: Benin – Innovative public private partnerships for rural water services sustainability - A Case Study
Report: The Limits and possibilities of Prepaid Water in Urban Africa: lessons from the field
Research Brief: Governments Don’t Have to Go It Alone: Leveraging public funds to attract commercial finance for improved water services
Research Brief: Making toilets more affordable for the poor through microfinance – lessons learned from introducing microfinance loans for sanitation in rural Cambodia
Water Paper: Applying Results-Based Financing in Water Investments
Water Paper: Capital Subsidies Implicit in Concessional Finance
Water Paper: Investing in Water Infrastructure: Capital, Operations and Maintenance
Water Paper: Strengthening the Financial System for Water in Mexico: From a Conceptual Framework to the Formulation of Pilot Initiatives

Annual Reports

Annual Report: Water and Sanitation Program End of Year Report, Fiscal Year 2014
Annual Report: Water Security for All: The Next Wave of Tools (Water Partnership Program 2013/14 Annual Report)

Sustainable Water Supply and Sanitation Services for All

Book: The International Benchmarking Network Water Supply and Sanitation Blue Book
Brochure: MAPAS: Regional Synthesis of Central America and Dominican Republic
Compendium: Taking on New Challenges: A Compendium of Good Practices in Rural Water Supply Schemes
Field Note: Delivering Water Supply and Sanitation Services in Fragile States: Professionalizing Drinking Water Service Delivery in Small Towns of Haiti
Field Note: Improving On-site Sanitation and Connections to Sewers in Southeast Asia – Insights from Indonesia and Vietnam – Indonesia and Vietnam Country Report
Field Note: Managing Public Water Service in Medium-Sized African Cities (English) (French)
Learning Note: Beyond one-size-fits-all: Lessons learned from eight water utility Public-Private Partnerships in the Philippines
Learning Note: Scaling Up Indonesia’s Rural Sanitation Mobile Monitoring System Nationally
Policy Note: MajiVoice: A New Accountability Tool to Improve Public Services
Regional Report: Water and Wastewater Services in the Danube Region: A State of the Sector
Report: Levers of change in the Senegal rural Water Sector (English) (French)
Research Brief: Investing in the Next Generation: Children grow taller, and smarter, in rural, mountainous villages of Vietnam where community members use improved sanitation
Research Brief: Investing in the Next Generation: Children grow taller, and smarter, in rural villages of Lao PDR where all community members use improved sanitation
Research Brief: Investing in the Next Generation: Growing tall and smart with toilets – stopping open defecation improves children’s height in Cambodia
Study: Poor-Inclusive Urban Sanitation: An Overview
Synthesis Report: (EAP) Service Delivery Assessment
Technical Paper: Economic Assessment of Sanitation Interventions in Southeast Asia: A six -country study conducted in Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, The Philippines, Vietnam and Yunnan Province under the Economics of Sanitation Initiative
Technical Paper: Monitoring sanitation and hygiene in rural Ethiopia: A diagnostic analysis of systems, tools and capacity
Technical Paper: Validity of Rapid Measures of Handwashing Behavior: An Analysis of Data from Multiple Impact Evaluations in the Global Scaling Up Handwashing Project
Toolkit: Toolkit for the Preparation of a Drinking Water Security Plan
Working Paper: Scaling Up Rural Sanitation - What Influences Open Defecation and Latrine Ownership in Rural Households?: Findings from a Global Review
WSP Result Flyer FY15: Africa Region
WSP Result Flyer FY15: East Asia and Pacific Region
WSP Result Flyer FY15: Latin America and the Caribbean Region
WSP Result Flyer FY15: South Asia Region