BRIEF

Evidence to Policy: Early Childhood Development notes

October 3, 2016

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Evidence to Policy, a monthly note series on learning what works, highlights studies that evaluate the impact of programs in the critical areas of human development --health, education, social protection, water and sanitation and labor. From how to best supply rural health clinics with drugs to what helps students do better in school, World Bank-supported impact evaluations provide governments and development experts with the information they need to use resources most effectively. As impact evaluations increasingly become more important to policymakers, this series offers a non-technical review of the many innovations the World Bank is supporting, and the growing number of rigorous studies analyzing the impacts of those innovations. The note series is managed by SIEF, which receives generous funding from the British government's Department for International Development and the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF).

 

CAMBODIA: CHALLENGES IN SCALING UP PRESCHOOLS

Researchers worked with the Government of Cambodia to evaluate the impact of three pilot early childhood development programs that were being scaled up with assistance from the World Bank. 

 

JAMAICA: HELPING CHILDREN DEVELOP INTO HEALTHY, PRODUCTIVE ADULTS

This policy note reviews the evaluation of a program in Jamaica that targeted mothers of babies stunted due to malnutrition, offering a rare look at the effects of early childhood intervention over the decades.
Also available in SpanishFrench

 

MOZAMBIQUE: DO PRESCHOOLS HELP CHILDREN?

To test the effectiveness of preschool programs on children’s enrollment in and readiness for primary school, the World Bank supported a study of an early childhood development preschool program in Mozambique run by Save the Children. The evaluation showed that children enrolled in preschool were better prepared for the demands of schooling than children who did not attend preschool and that they were more likely to start primary school by age 6.
Also available in FrenchSpanish

 

NEPAL: CAN INFORMATION AND CASH IMPROVE CHILDREN'S DEVELOPMENT?

In Nepal, researchers supported by the World Bank’s Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund worked with the government to develop a program to inform pregnant women and mothers of young children on how to best care for themselves and their children, using already ongoing community meetings to deliver messages.

 

NIGER: CAN CASH AND BEHAVIORAL CHANGE PROGRAMS IMPROVE CHILD DEVELOPMENT?

An evaluation of an effort to improve child development through a social safety nets program found that behavioral change activities improved women’s knowledge and practices. But there was little impact on children’s physical growth or cognitive development.