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Trade, Poverty, and Shared Prosperity Conference
December 10-11, 2014World Bank Headquarters, Washington, D.C.

How can globalization be harnessed to reduce poverty and boost shared prosperity? This conference organized by the World Bank’s research department will convene leading academics and senior policy experts to address these issues, drawing on state of the art research on the relationship between trade and household welfare.

How can globalization be harnessed to reduce poverty and boost shared prosperity? This two day conference organized by the World Bank’s research department will convene leading academics and senior policy experts to address these issues, drawing on state of the art research on the relationship between trade and household welfare. The objective of the conference is to identify trade policies that can accelerate progress toward the twin goals.

Conference Organizer

Bob Rijkers, Economist, Trade and International Integration, Development Research Group


Inquiries

For inquiries regarding the event, please contact Bob Rijkers at brijkers@worldbank.org.


Trade, Poverty and Shared Prosperity Conference: Tentative Program
December 10 and 11, 2014
Venue: Main Complex

December 10: Room MC C2-131 
December 11: Room MC 2-800

December 10 (Day 1) 
Room MC C2-131 

8.30 – 9.00

Breakfast

9:00 – 9:15

Opening Remarks: Asli Demirguc-Kunt

GLOBALIZATION AND HOUSEHOLD WELFARE
Chair: 
Aart Kraay

9:15 – 10:45

Retail Globalization and Household Welfare: Evidence from Mexico
David Atkin, Benjamin Faber, Marco Gonzalez-Navarro

Trading Off Inequality and Growth with Trade Policy
Guido Porto

10:45 – 11:15

Coffee Break

THE LABOR MARKET
Chair: 
Martin Rama

11:15 – 12:45

Why Are American Workers Getting Poorer? Estimating the Impact of Trade and Offshoring Using the CPS
Estimating the Impact of Trade and Offshoring on American Workers Using the Current Population Surveys
Avraham Ebenstein, Ann Harrison, Margaret McMillan, Shannon Phillips

A Mapping of Labor Mobility Costs in Developing Countries
Erhan Artuc, Daniel Lederman, Guido Porto

12:45 – 14:00

Lunch

THE PERSISTENCE OF HISTORY
Chair: 
Indermit Gill

14:00 – 15:30

Overcoming the Tyranny of History: Evidence from Post-Apartheid South Africa 
Paolo Bastos and Nicolas Bottan

Railroads and the Demise of Famine in India
Robin Burgess and Dave Donaldson

15:30 – 16:00

Coffee Break

EXPORT PROMOTION
Chair: 
Luis Serven

16:00 – 16:45

Exporting and Firm Performance: Evidence from a Randomized Trial
David Atkin, Amit Khandelwal, Adam Osman

December 11 (Day 2)
Room MC 2-800

8:30 – 9:00

Coffee Break

CRIME AND CONFLICT
Chair: 
Peter Lanjouw

9:00 – 10:30

Poverty and Crime: Evidence from Rainfall and Trade Shocks in India 
Lakshmi Iyer, Petia Topolova

How Valuable is Market Access? Evidence from the West Bank
Alexei Abrahams, Brian Blankespoor, Bob Rijkers, Roy van der Weide

10:30 – 11:00

Coffee Break

FOOD PRICES AND POVERTY
Chair: 
Rabah Arezki

11:00 – 12:30

Food Prices, Wages and Rural Welfare in India
Hanan Jacoby

Short- and Long-Run Impacts of Food Price Changes on Poverty
Maros Ivanic, Will Martin

12:30 – 14:00

Lunch

EXPERT PANEL: TRADE AND THE TWIN GOALS – THE WAY AHEAD
Moderator: 
Aaditya Mattoo

14:00 – 15:45

Panelists: Alan Winters, Branko Milanovic, Ana Revenga, Chico Ferreira

15:45 – 16:00

Closing Remarks: Anabel Gonzalez



Last Updated: Dec 09, 2014


  • CONFERENCE ORGANIZER

  • Bob Rijkers

    Economist, Trade and International Integration Team, Development Research Group, World Bank
    Bob Rijkers is an economist in the Trade and International Integration Unit of the Development Research Group. He is interested in political economy, trade and labor market issues. Since joining the World Bank full-time in 2008, he has worked in the Poverty Reduction Anchor of the PREM network, the Macroeconomics and Growth Unit of the Development Economics Research Group and the Office of the Chief Economist of the Middle East and Northern Africa region. He holds a BA in Science and Social Sciences from University College Utrecht, Utrecht University and an M.Phil. and D.Phil. in Economics from the University of Oxford.
  • Rabah Arezki

    Senior Economist, Research Department, IMF
    Rabah Arezki heads the commodities research team in the IMF Research Department. He is also a non-resident fellow at the Brookings Institution and at the University of Oxford. He has published widely in academic and other journals, including the Economic Journal, the Journal of International Economics, the Journal of Development Economics, the European Economic Review, the World Bank Economic Review, the Journal of International Money and Finance, the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, and World Development. He obtained his M.Sc. from the Ecole Nationale de la Statistique et de l’Administration Economique in Paris, France and his PhD from the European University Institute, in Florence, Italy.
  • David Atkin

    Assistant Professor of Economics at UCLA
    David Atkin is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research focuses on evaluating the impacts of trade on the poor. His recent work has studied the role of regional taste differences in altering the impacts of trade reforms in India, educational responses to the rise of export oriented manufacturing in Mexico, abnd the impact of globalization on the poor. David holds a PhD from Princeton University.
  • Erhan Artuc

    Economist, Development Research Group, Trade and International Integration Team, World Bank
    Erhan Artuc is an economist in the Development Research Group, Trade and International Integration Team. Prior to joining the World Bank in 2011, he was a faculty member at Koc University in Istanbul - Turkey, where he taught International Trade, Microeconomics and Macroeconomics. He received his BA degree in 2001 from Bilkent University, Ankara and his Ph.D. in 2006 from the University of Virginia, both in economics. Artuc’s research focuses on international trade policy and its effects on labor markets. He has studied distributional effects of trade, timing of trade policy, occupational and sectoral mobility of workers, unemployment, and changes in skill premium in response to trade shocks and discount window borrowing from central banks. In his research, Artuc develops models that can forecast effects of a new trade policy before its implementation (i.e. counterfactual policy simulations). His research papers have appeared in the Journal of International Economics, the American Economic Review and other academic or policy journals.
  • Paulo Bastos

    Economist, Development Research Group, Trade and International Integration Team, World Bank
    Paulo Bastos is an Economist at the Development Research Group of the World Bank, Trade and International Integration Unit (DECTI). His research interests include the drivers of firm performance in international markets, the distributional impacts of globalization, and the nexus between migration and trade. His research has appeared in scholarly journals such as the Journal of International Economics, the Journal of Development Economics, the Journal of Industrial Economics and the International Journal of Industrial Organization. Prior to joining the World Bank, he held positions at the Research Department of the Inter-American Development Bank, the European Commission and the University of Nottingham. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Nottingham and a B.A. in Economics from the University of Porto.
  • Asli Demirguc-Kunt

    Director of Research, World Bank
    Asli Demirguc-Kunt is Director of Research at the World Bank. After joining the Bank in 1989 as a Young Economist, she has held different positions, including Director of Development Policy, Chief Economist of the Financial and Private Sector Development Network, and Senior Research Manager, doing research and advising on financial sector and private sector development issues. She is the lead author of the 2007 World Bank Policy Research Report, Finance for All? Policies and Pitfalls in Expanding Access. She has also created the World Bank’s Global Financial Development Report and directed the issues on Rethinking the Role of the State in Finance (2013), and Financial Inclusion (2014). The author of over 100 publications, Ms. Demirgüç-Kunt has published widely in academic journals. Her research has focused on the links between financial development and firm performance and economic development. Banking crises, financial regulation, access to financial services including SME finance are among her areas of research. Prior to coming to the Bank, she was an Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. She holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in economics from the Ohio State University.
  • Dave Donaldson

    Associate Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Stanford University
    Dave Donaldson is an Associate Professor of Economics at Stanford University. He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and a Masters in Physics from Oxford University. His research concerns the role of trade integration in the role of economic development, and has been published in scholarly journals such as the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy and the Review of Economic Studies. He holds editorial positions at the Journal of International Economics, the Quarterly Journal of Economics and the Review of Economic Studies, and has previously held permanent and visiting faculty positions in the Department of Economics at MIT and Harvard University.
  • Benjamin Faber

    Assistant Professor of Economics, University of California Berkeley
    Ben Faber is Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his PhD from the London School of Economics and spent part of his doctoral studies visiting the Anderson School of Management at UCLA and the Department of Economics at MIT. His research interests include globalization and development, household cost of living, and real income inequality.
  • Francisco Ferreira

    Chief Economist, Africa Region, World Bank
    Francisco H. G. Ferreira is the World Bank’s Chief Economist for the Africa Region and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA, Bonn). He was formerly a lead economist in the Bank’s Research Department, and has also served as Deputy Chief Economist for Latin America and the Caribbean, and as co-Director of the World Development Report 2006, on Equity and Development. Francisco has published widely in the fields of poverty and inequality in developing countries. He was awarded the Haralambos Simeonides and the Adriano Romariz Duarte Prizes by the Brazilian Economic and Econometric Societies, respectively, and the Kendricks Prize by the International Association for Research in Income and Wealth. He also serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Economic Inequality, the Review of Income and Wealth, the World Bank Economic Review and the Economic Analysis Review. Francisco has taught at the Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro and at the Paris School of Economics. He was born and raised in São Paulo, Brazil, and holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the London School of Economics.
  • Indermit Gill

    Director for Development Policy, Office of the Chief Economist, World Bank
    Indermit Gill is the Director for Development Policy in the Office of the Senior Vice President and Chief Economist, World Bank. Prior to taking this position, Mr. Gill was the Chief Economist of the Europe and Central Asia Region of the World Bank, and before that he was the Director of the World Development Report 2009: Reshaping Economic Geography. Mr. Gill has also served as Country Economist for Brazil, Lead Economist in the Human Development network, and Sector Manager in the Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Unit of the East Asia and Pacific Regional Office. His research has been published in several books and academic journals. He has an M.A. in Economics from the Delhi School of Economics, and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago. Prior to taking this position, Mr. Gill was the Chief Economist of the Europe and Central Asia Region of the World Bank, and before that he was the Director of theWorld Development Report 2009: Reshaping Economic Geography. Mr. Gill joined the World Bank in 1993 and has held various positions since then, including Sector Manager in the Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Unit of the East Asia and Pacific Regional Office, where he was also Economic Advisor to the Chief Economist. Prior to this, he was the Economic Advisor to the Vice President of the Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Unit. From 1997-99, Mr. Gill worked as a Senior Country Economist in the Brazil Country Management Unit. Upon his return to Washington in 2000, he served for two years as Lead Economist of Human Development in the Latin America and the Caribbean Regional Office. Mr. Gill’s research has been published in several books and academic journals. He has an M.A. in Economics from the Delhi School of Economics, and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago.
  • Anabel Gonzalez

    Senior Director of the World Bank Group Global Practice on Trade and Competitiveness
    Anabel Gonzalez, a Costa Rican and U.S. national, has been Senior Director of the World Bank Group Global Practice on Trade and Competitiveness since July 1, 2014. Previously, she served as Costa Rica’s Minister of Foreign Trade and the president's principal advisor, negotiator, and spokesperson on trade and investment policy. During her tenure, Anabel led Costa Rica’s efforts to join the OECD, negotiated, approved, and implemented six free trade agreements - including with China and the European Union - and implemented policies that significantly enhanced the investment climate in Costa Rica and contributed to attracting over 140 investment projects. She also had a lead role in Costa Rica’s Competitiveness and Innovation Council. During her more than 15 years of service with the Ministry of Foreign Trade, she has held various positions including Director General for International Trade Negotiations and Vice-Minister of Foreign Trade. She also served as the Director to the Agriculture and Commodities Division of the World Trade Organization, where she contributed to the Doha Round, providing advice and support to senior management and member countries. She also worked at the Inter-American Development Bank as Senior International Consultant on Trade and Investment, leading projects related to implementation of trade agreements, regional economic integration, Aid for Trade, and investment issues. For the past two years, Anabel has served as Chair of the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Trade and Foreign Direct Investment. As from September 2014, she will lead the Global Agenda Council on Competitiveness. Anabel holds an LLM from Georgetown University and a law degree from University of Costa Rica.
  • Ann Harrison

    Professor of Management, the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
    Ann E. Harrison is a Professor of Management at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and an affiliate of the International Growth Centre in London. She has also taught at Columbia Business School, the University of California, Berkeley, the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and the University of Paris. Before joining the Wharton School, Professor Harrison was the Director of Development Policy at the World Bank. Professor Harrison received her PhD in Economics from Princeton University and graduated with highest distinction in economics and history from the University of California, Berkeley.
  • Hanan Jacoby

    Lead Economist, Agriculture and Rural Development Team, Research Department, World Bank
    Hanan Jacoby is a lead economist in the Agriculture and Rural Development unit. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago in 1989. Before joining the Bank in 1998, he taught at the University of Rochester and also visited Princeton, Penn, and IFPRI. Mr. Jacoby has wide-ranging interests in agriculture, rural institutions, and human capital and has published articles on land tenancy, groundwater markets, rural roads, risk-coping, child nutrition and schooling, and the economics of marriage in journals such as the American Economic Review, the Economic Journal, the Journal of Political Economy, and the Review of Economic Studies. He currently serves as associate editor for the Journal of Development Economics and Economic Development and Cultural Change.
  • Aart Kraay

    Senior Advisor, Development Research Group, World Bank
    Aart Kraay is an economist in the Development Research Group at the World Bank. He joined the World Bank in 1995 after earning a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University (1995), and a B.Sc. in economics from the University of Toronto (1990). His research interests include international capital movements, growth and inequality, governance, and the Chinese economy. His research on these topics has been published in scholarly journals such as the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Economic Journal, the Journal of Monetary Economics, the Journal of International Economics, and the Journal of the European Economic Association. He is an associate editor of the Journal of Development Economics, and is an adjunct professor at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. He has also held visiting positions at the International Monetary Fund and the Sloan School of Management at MIT.
  • Will Martin

    Research Manager, Agriculture and Rural Development, Development Research Group, World Bank
    Will Martin is Research Manager, Agriculture and Rural Development, in the Development Research Group. He obtained his first degrees from the University of Queensland and the Australian National University, and Masters and PhD degrees from Iowa State University. Before joining the World Bank, he worked as a researcher and manager at the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics, and as a Senior Research Fellow at the Australian National University. He has published extensively on agricultural trade policy and developing countries, with a particular focus on the World Trade Organization and economic development. He has published widely using quantitative models such as the Global Trade Analysis Project, and has a particular interest in using detailed data to build up a complete picture of the effects of policies on welfare impacts at national and household levels.
  • Aaditya Mattoo

    Research Manager, Trade and International Integration, Development Research Group, World Bank
    Aaditya Mattoo is Research Manager, Trade and Integration, at the World Bank. He specializes in trade policy analysis and the operation of the WTO, and provides policy advice to governments. Prior to joining the Bank in 1999, Mr. Mattoo was Economic Counsellor at the World Trade Organization. Between 1988 and 1991, he taught economics at the University of Sussex and Churchill College, Cambridge University. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Cambridge, and an M.Phil in Economics from the University of Oxford. He has published widely in academic and other journals on trade, trade in services, development and the WTO and his work has been cited extensively, including in the Economist, Financial Times, New York Times, and Time Magazine.
  • Guido Porto

    Professor of Economics Universidad Nacional de La Plata
    Guido Porto is a Professor at The National University of La Plata. His research focuses on the relation between trade and poverty and has been published in leading journals including The American Economic Review, The Review of Economics and Statistics, and the Journal of International Economics. Guido spent several years in the Development Economics Research Group at the World Bank and received his PhD from Princeton University.
  • Martin Rama

    Chief Economist, South Asia, Region, World Bank
    Martin Rama is the Chief Economist for the South Asia region of the World Bank, based in Delhi. Before that he was the Director of the World Development Report (WDR) 2013, on Jobs. Previously, for eight years, he was the Lead Economist for Vietnam, based in Hanoi. Prior to moving to operations, he spent ten years with the research department of the World Bank. Martin Rama gained his degree in economics from the Universidad de la República (Uruguay) in 1981 and his Ph.D. in macroeconomics from the Université de Paris I (France) in 1985.
  • Petia Topalova

    Senior Economist, World Economic Studies Division, Research Department, IMF
    Petia Topalova is a Senior Economist in the World Economic Studies Division of the IMF’s Research Department. Her research is in the areas of economic development and international trade with a focus on India. She previously worked on India and Bhutan while in the IMF’s Asia and Pacific Department, and taught at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She holds a Ph.D. in Economics from MIT.
  • Branko Milanovic

    Senior Scholar, Luxembourg Income Study Center; Visiting Presidential Professor, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
    Branko Milanovic is a leading scholar on income inequality who joined The Graduate Center as Visiting Presidential Professor and Senior Scholar in the LIS Center. Before coming to the LIS Center, he was Lead Economist in the World Bank's research department. He is the author of The Haves and the Have-Nots: A Brief and Idiosyncratic History of Global Inequality and numerous articles on the global income distribution.
  • Ana Revenga

    Senior Director, Poverty Global Practice, World Bank
    Ana Revenga is the Senior Director of the Poverty Global Practice at the World Bank Group. In her 24-year career at the World Bank, she has worked in both technical and management positions in the East Asia and the Pacific, Europe and Central Asia, Latin America, and Middle East, including as Director of Human Development in the Europe and Central Asia Region, Acting Vice President for the Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network at the World Bank and Director of the Poverty Reduction and Equity Group at the World Bank. Ms. Revenga was co-Director of the 2012 World Development Report on Gender Equality and Development. She was one of the authors of the 1995 World Development Report and contributed to the 2006 World Development Report. Prior to joining the World Bank, she worked in the Central Bank of Spain and taught labor and international economics at the Centro de Estudios Monetarios and Financieros. She has published extensively on education and employment, equity, food security, social protection, poverty, and trade issues. She has a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and a degree in Human Rights from the Law Faculty at the University of Geneva.
  • Luis Serven

    Research Manager Macroeconomics and Growth, Development Research Group, World Bank
    Luis Serven is Research Manager for Macroeconomics and Growth in the Development Research Group. After joining the Bank in 1988, he worked at the Research department, and between 1999 and 2004 he managed the regional research program on Latin America and the Caribbean. Prior to joining the Bank he worked as a senior researcher at FEDEA and taught at the Universidad Complutense of Madrid, MIT and CEMFI. His recent research focuses on open economy macroeconomics, fiscal policy and growth, exchange rate regimes, international portfolio diversification, saving and investment determinants, and microeconomic regulation and growth. He holds a Bachelor in economics from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • Alan Winters

    Professor of Economics, University of Sussex
    Alan Winters is Professor of Economics in the University of Sussex. He is a Research Fellow and former Programme Director of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR, London) and Fellow of IZA, Munich. From 2008 to 2011 he was Chief Economist at the British government’s Department for International Development (DFID), and from 2004 to 2007 Director of the Development Research Group of the World Bank. He has previously worked as Division Chief and Research Manager (1994-99) and Economist (1983-85) at the World Bank and in the Universities of Cambridge, Bristol, Bangor and Birmingham. He has been editor of the World Bank Economic Review, associate editor of the Economic Journal, and is now editor of The World Trade Review; he serves on several editorial boards. Alan Winters is a leading specialist on the empirical and policy analysis of international trade, especially in developing countries, and has recently also worked on migration, the brain drain and economic growth. He has published over two hundred articles and chapters and thirty books in areas such as regional trading arrangements, non-tariff barriers, European integration, transition economies’ trade, international labour migration, agricultural protection, trade and poverty, and the world trading system. He has also published on small economies, global warming, pricing behavior and econometrics. His current programme includes work on migration, trade and poverty, growth and China and the World Trading System.
  • World Bank Headquarters
    1818 H Street, NW, Washington, DC

    Day 1, December 10, 2014: MC C2-131
    Day 2, December 11, 2014: MC 2-800
  • Non-bank visitors please enter the building at the corner of 18th and Pennsylvania.

WHAT DID I MISS BY NOT ATTENDING THE TRADE, POVERTY, AND SHARED PROSPERITY CONFERENCE?


Are supermarkets good for the poor? Does openness exacerbate volatility? Will food price increases help or hurt poverty reduction? How do labor markets modulate the impact of globalization? Does trade-induced inequality cause crime? These are among the questions addressed at the Trade, Poverty and Shared Prosperity conference taking place on December 10th and 11th. Comprising six sessions, an expert panel, and opening remarks by Asli Demirguc-Kunt, the conference examines both how globalization impacts poverty and inequality, and how policymakers can harness its potential to catalyze development.

How Does Globalization Impact Poverty and Inequality?

Trade impacts household welfare both by changing the prices and availability of consumption goods and altering income earning opportunities. How to measure these different effects is the focus of the opening session on Globalization and Household Welfare. Guido Porto will present a new methodology to quantify trade-offs between efficiency and equity in trade protection. Benjamin Faber shows that the emergence of supermarket chains in Mexico increased household welfare by lowering prices and augmenting the supply of higher quality goods, without inducing sizeable employment losses.

The importance of these channels of impact may vary over time, leading to intertemporal tradeoffs. While higher food prices tend to exacerbate poverty in the short-run, as many poor people are net purchasers of food, they reduce poverty in the longer run, by raising wages for low-skilled people. In the session on Food Prices and Poverty, Hanan Jacoby and Will Martin discuss the policy implications of these countervailing effects.

Countries with more flexible labor markets are better capable of minimizing such trade-offs as they adjust more quickly, as shown by Erhan Artuc in a session on the Labor Market.  When rigidities are rife, adjustment costs may dwarf the gains from liberalization. Ann Harrison documents how globalization led U.S. workers to move from high-paid manufacturing jobs to lower paid services jobs. Failing to account for such adjustment, as the majority of studies do, leads to overly optimistic estimates of the gains from globalization.

Yet, the impacts of globalization on human behavior extend far beyond consumption and income alone. Lakshmi Iyer, for example, shows how trade-induced inequality may incentivize crime in a session on Crime and Conflict.

What Should Policy Makers Do?

When managed appropriately, increased integration has enormous potential to catalyze development. The historical and (quasi-)experimental evidence presented at the conference shows that:

  • Investing in connectivity can catalyze growth and reduce vulnerability. Dave Donaldson demonstrates how the expansion of railroads in India reduced the incidence of famines by minimizing income volatility due to local weather shocks. Bob Rijkers provides further evidence that market access is conducive to development by showing how mobility restrictions imposed by Israel in the aftermath of the second intifada stunted growth in the West Bank.
  • Inclusive institutions help harness the potential development impact of trade. In a session on the Persistence of History, Paulo Bastos demonstrates how the end of Apartheid has shaped development patterns in South Africa. The attendant dismantling of coercive institutions enabled especially rapid growth amongst formerly discriminated black communities that were subsequently able to share the spoils of natural resource rents.
  • Export Promotion pays off. Using a randomized control trial, David Atkin shows that Egyptian rug producers who were incentivized to export became more productive, improved the quality of their rugs, and increased their profits by 25%.

Ask the Experts!

The culmination of the conference will be the Expert Panel moderated by Aaditya Mattoo, in which Alan Winters, Branko Milanovic, Ana Revenga and Francisco Ferreira who will debate a number of propositions, including:

  • Trade policy should be pursued with the goal of enhancing efficiency; the pursuit of distributional goals should be left to other instruments of policy.
  • The inclusion of “boosting shared prosperity” as one of the Twin Goals does not meaningfully alter the World Bank Group’s trade policy advice.
  • The trade and poverty research agenda is passé.

Anabel Gonzalez will summarize the debate and its implications for the World Bank’s trade strategy.

Moreover, you will have ample opportunity to ask these experts your questions, so don’t miss out!

Event Details