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FEATURE STORY

Korean Institutions Commit to Help Transform Science and Technology Education in Africa

November 19, 2015


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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Institutions in Korea have committed to sharing knowledge and skills to develop human capital science and technology in Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Goals for the partnership include the development of regional centers for technical and vocational education, regional forums and country action plans
  • During a recent workshop, participants agreed on concrete actions to achieve partnership goals

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA November 19, 2015 – A range of institutions in Korea have expressed a strong commitment to strengthen PASET, an Africa-led international partnership to build scientific, engineering, and technical skills in Sub-Saharan African countries.

During a September 13-16 visit by PASET’s technical executive committee to Korea, academic and research institutions vowed to help African countries through a government-to-government program which would facilitate knowledge exchanges, scholarships, and capacity development for institutions.

The visit was built around a workshop to promote knowledge-based development cooperation between Korea and Africa. Korea has consistently participated in PASET through the initiative’s inception in 2013, especially through Korea Development Institute (KDI) which facilitated the workshop.  

Less than a quarter of students in African universities are enrolled today in science, engineering and technology programs. In order to address this striking gap, it is crucial for African countries to align with different and new partners around their unique education and development priorities. Industrialized nations such as Korea, who are significant investors in African countries, can play a key role to play in advancing these priorities.


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A plan for knowledge-sharing

The workshop on knowledge-based cooperation was a follow-up to a regional conference held in July in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, titled Africa’s Transformation: Leveraging Partnership with Korea. The conference was co-hosted by KDI and the World Bank under the auspices of PASET. It had set the following goals for Korean institutions to advance their Africa partnership: integrate skills development in Korea’s “Knowledge Sharing Program;” help create regional centers for technical and vocational education training (TVET); facilitate analytical studies and other PASET activities; hold a regional forum; and develop country action plans.

The workshop launched concrete action to achieve these goals. The participants from PASET’s technical executive committee included representatives of the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research of Senegal, Ministry of Education of Rwanda, Ministry of Education of Ethiopia, Planet Earth Institute, and the World Bank. Along with KDI, they identified potential partner institutions and discussed the scope, modalities and division of their roles for future cooperation. They also agreed on a tentative schedule for this cooperation.

The following next steps were agreed upon:

  • Crystallize new partner roles through consultations between partner institutions.
  • Identify high quality Korean universities with research training capabilities in Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology (ASET) to participate in PASET’s Regional Scholarship and Innovation Fund.
  • Submit a “Demand Matrix” outlining potential areas of collaboration to KDI, which would also facilitate links with new partner institutions.

To share knowledge about Korea’s dramatic success in recent years in TVET and ASET, KDI also arranged visits for workshop participants to a range of national institutions:

  • Korea’s Global Institute for Transferring Skills (GIFTS) shared information on its National Qualifications System, National Competency System, work-based learning systems, and previous experiences in international cooperation. 
  • University of Science and Technology (UST) highlighted its national research institution-based graduate studies offered by 30+ institutions, and its existing international cooperation programs including those with African countries.
  • The Korea Research Institute for Vocational Research and Training (KRIVET) explained its secondary and tertiary TVET policies in Korea, and links with international benchmarks such as the Meister schools for industrial training, which has achieved well-documented success in vocational education.

Representatives from the three founding African countries -- Rwanda, Ethiopia, and Senegal -- displayed a keenness and ownership in devising a path forward. This ownership is critical to PASET initiatives, which are built upon the coming together of African governments with international education/training institutions, business leaders, and the World Bank to generate human capital that can help combat their development challenges.

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About PASET

The Partnership for Skills in Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology (PASET) was launched in 2013 with the objective of strengthening the contribution of science, technology and engineering to socio-economic transformation in sub-Saharan Africa. It aims to accelerate the creation of a skilled workforce in Africa through high quality educational and training programs, and works through collaboration between the public and private sectors as well as among Sub-Saharan African countries and countries in other regions. PASET’s steering committee comprises of education ministers from Ethiopia, Rwanda and Senegal – the three countries that have taken the lead in the initiative. Additional members include the World Bank, which provides technical assistance and advice on establishment of partnerships and regional initiatives, and the Planet Earth Institute.

A plan for knowledge-sharing

The workshop on knowledge-based cooperation was a follow-up to a regional conference held in July in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, titled Africa’s Transformation: Leveraging Partnership with Korea. The conference was co-hosted by KDI and the World Bank under the auspices of PASET. It had set the following goals for Korean institutions to advance their Africa partnership: integrate skills development in Korea’s “Knowledge Sharing Program;” help create regional centers for technical and vocational education training (TVET); facilitate analytical studies and other PASET activities; hold a regional forum; and develop country action plans.

The workshop launched concrete action to achieve these goals. The participants from PASET’s technical executive committee included representatives of the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research of Senegal, Ministry of Education of Rwanda, Ministry of Education of Ethiopia, Planet Earth Institute, and the World Bank. Along with KDI, they identified potential partner institutions and discussed the scope, modalities and division of their roles for future cooperation. They also agreed on a tentative schedule for this cooperation.

The following next steps were agreed upon:

  • Crystallize new partner roles through consultations between partner institutions.
  • Identify high quality Korean universities with research training capabilities in Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology (ASET) to participate in PASET’s Regional Scholarship and Innovation Fund.
  • Submit a “Demand Matrix” outlining potential areas of collaboration to KDI, which would also facilitate links with new partner institutions.

To share knowledge about Korea’s dramatic success in recent years in TVET and ASET, KDI also arranged visits for workshop participants to a range of national institutions:

  • Korea’s Global Institute for Transferring Skills (GIFTS) shared information on its National Qualifications System, National Competency System, work-based learning systems, and previous experiences in international cooperation. 
  • University of Science and Technology (UST) highlighted its national research institution-based graduate studies offered by 30+ institutions, and its existing international cooperation programs including those with African countries.
  • The Korea Research Institute for Vocational Research and Training (KRIVET) explained its secondary and tertiary TVET policies in Korea, and links with international benchmarks such as the Meister schools for industrial training, which has achieved well-documented success in vocational education.

Representatives from the three founding African countries -- RwandaEthiopia, and Senegal -- displayed a keenness and ownership in devising a path forward. This ownership is critical to PASET initiatives, which are built upon the coming together of African governments with international education/training institutions, business leaders, and the World Bank to generate human capital that can help combat their development challenges.

###

About PASET

The Partnership for Skills in Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology (PASET) was launched in 2013 with the objective of strengthening the contribution of science, technology and engineering to socio-economic transformation in sub-Saharan Africa. It aims to accelerate the creation of a skilled workforce in Africa through high quality educational and training programs, and works through collaboration between the public and private sectors as well as among Sub-Saharan African countries and countries in other regions. PASET’s steering committee comprises of education ministers from Ethiopia, Rwanda and Senegal – the three countries that have taken the lead in the initiative. Additional members include the World Bank, which provides technical assistance and advice on establishment of partnerships and regional initiatives, and the Planet Earth Institute. 

A plan for knowledge-sharing

The workshop on knowledge-based cooperation was a follow-up to a regional conference held in July in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, titled Africa’s Transformation: Leveraging Partnership with Korea. The conference was co-hosted by KDI and the World Bank under the auspices of PASET. It had set the following goals for Korean institutions to advance their Africa partnership: integrate skills development in Korea’s “Knowledge Sharing Program;” help create regional centers for technical and vocational education training (TVET); facilitate analytical studies and other PASET activities; hold a regional forum; and develop country action plans.

The workshop launched concrete action to achieve these goals. The participants from PASET’s technical executive committee included representatives of the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research of Senegal, Ministry of Education of Rwanda, Ministry of Education of Ethiopia, Planet Earth Institute, and the World Bank. Along with KDI, they identified potential partner institutions and discussed the scope, modalities and division of their roles for future cooperation. They also agreed on a tentative schedule for this cooperation.

The following next steps were agreed upon:

  • Crystallize new partner roles through consultations between partner institutions.
  • Identify high quality Korean universities with research training capabilities in Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology (ASET) to participate in PASET’s Regional Scholarship and Innovation Fund.
  • Submit a “Demand Matrix” outlining potential areas of collaboration to KDI, which would also facilitate links with new partner institutions.

To share knowledge about Korea’s dramatic success in recent years in TVET and ASET, KDI also arranged visits for workshop participants to a range of national institutions:

  • Korea’s Global Institute for Transferring Skills (GIFTS) shared information on its National Qualifications System, National Competency System, work-based learning systems, and previous experiences in international cooperation. 
  • University of Science and Technology (UST) highlighted its national research institution-based graduate studies offered by 30+ institutions, and its existing international cooperation programs including those with African countries.
  • The Korea Research Institute for Vocational Research and Training (KRIVET) explained its secondary and tertiary TVET policies in Korea, and links with international benchmarks such as the Meister schools for industrial training, which has achieved well-documented success in vocational education.

Representatives from the three founding African countries -- RwandaEthiopia, and Senegal -- displayed a keenness and ownership in devising a path forward. This ownership is critical to PASET initiatives, which are built upon the coming together of African governments with international education/training institutions, business leaders, and the World Bank to generate human capital that can help combat their development challenges.

###

About PASET

The Partnership for Skills in Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology (PASET) was launched in 2013 with the objective of strengthening the contribution of science, technology and engineering to socio-economic transformation in sub-Saharan Africa. It aims to accelerate the creation of a skilled workforce in Africa through high quality educational and training programs, and works through collaboration between the public and private sectors as well as among Sub-Saharan African countries and countries in other regions. PASET’s steering committee comprises of education ministers from Ethiopia, Rwanda and Senegal – the three countries that have taken the lead in the initiative. Additional members include the World Bank, which provides technical assistance and advice on establishment of partnerships and regional initiatives, and the Planet Earth Institute. 


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