Country Office Contacts
Chisinau, +373-22-200-706

Pushkin Street, 20/1, MD-2012, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova. Fax: (373 22) 237-053
moldova_contact@worldbank.org

Washington, +1 202-458-2736

1818 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20433

This page in:

Moldova Research

RECENTLY PUBLISHED

Country Gender Assessment (CGA)
Mar 30, 2014

This assessment provides a broad picture of gender disparities in Moldova in agency, education, health, and access to economic opportunities. The gender gap in education is small, yet it is greatest at higher...

Working Paper
Nov 11, 2013

The forestry sector in Moldova faces significant governance and sustainability challenges. The insufficient level of forest coverage in Moldova has a serious impact on environment and overall economic growth in ...

Brief
Sep 10, 2013

The World Bank Group is committed to including a gender lens in its activities and addressing gender-specific challenges to reduce inequalities between women and men. Europe and Central Asia’s 'Gender at a ...

Board Summary
Sep 10, 2013

European integration anchors the Government of Moldova's policy reform agenda but tensions between the majority coalition and the opposition, and within the majority, had slowed reforms. Moldova's economy has...

Development Policy Review (DPR)
Jun 01, 2013

The Government of Moldova is seeking to change the country's development paradigm and build an export-oriented economy characterized by investment, innovation, and competitiveness, following a decade of 'jobless...

ECONOMIC REPORT
The impact of emigration on source country wages

Reforms should continue to shelter Moldova from external risks and ensure inclusive growth.. Read More »

Experts
Qimiao Fan
Country Director for Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova
Abdoulaye Seck
Country Manager for Moldova
BLOGS

eGovernment for iReputation

Radu Cucos

Feb 25, 2014

Boosting Budget Transparency in Moldova

Victor Neagu

Dec 05, 2013

(1) Comment

POVERTY
The consequences of several shocks for consumption and poverty

Changes in workers' remittances, migration, and energy prices could influence consumption and poverty rates in some unexpected and even counter-intuitive ways. Read More »