This page in:

PRESS RELEASE

World Bank Approves Funds to Support Togo’s Efforts to Rehabilitate Roads and Drainage Systems Damaged by Flooding

June 4, 2013

WASHINGTON, June 4, 2013 - The World Bank's Board of Executive Directors today approved a US$14 million IDA* grant to support the Government of Togo’s efforts to rehabilitate roads, drains and other infrastructure, to scale-up urban services, and strengthen the capacity of institutions.

“Togo, together with most countries in West Africa, suffered from heavy precipitation and flooding during the fall of 2010 rainy season,” said Madani M. Tall, World Bank Country Director for Togo. “The proposed rehabilitation works will improve access to basic services and contribute to  creating jobs and supporting the Government  in its efforts to build resiliency to future flooding impacts.”

The funds will support the on-going Emergency Infrastructure Rehabilitation and Energy Project (EIREP). The project has two components: the first, rehabilitating infrastructure such as drains, canals and gutters, is aimed at reducing the number of people affected by periodic flooding in low-lying poor neighborhoods of the capital city, Lomé. The second component is designed to strengthen the capacity of the institutions involved in the management and implementation of the project and those responsible for delivering urban services.

“Over 86,000 people were affected throughout the country, many of whom lived mainly in low-lying pockets of Lomé,” said Jamal Saghir the World Bank's Director of Sustainable Development for the Africa Region. “This funding will enable the government of Togo to further expand the rehabilitation of the drainage system and roads while reducing the disruption of urban services.”

These funds will support the rebuilding some 10 kms of drainage infrastructure in Lome and of about five kilometers of secondary roads. The drainage works are expected to benefit some 48,000 people while the road upgrades will benefit as many as 27,500 people with all-season transport access.

“The labor-intensive methods for drain rehabilitation to be used under the project will clearly contribute to the livelihoods of local residents in the project neighborhoods. Moreover, the road rehabilitation efforts supported by these funds will improve and lower the cost of transportation in low-income neighborhoods located far from job opportunities,” said Kwabena Amankwah-Ayeh, World Bank Task Team Leader for the project. “I am pleased to continue supporting this project and the jobs and benefits it brings to the people living in and near Togo’s capital city.”

* The World Bank’s International Development Association (IDA), established in 1960, helps the world’s poorest countries by providing loans (called “credits”) and grants for projects and programs that boost economic growth, reduce poverty, and improve poor people’s lives. IDA is one of the largest sources of assistance for the world’s 82 poorest countries, 40 of which are in Africa. Resources from IDA bring positive change for 2.5 billion people living on less than $2 a day. Since 1960, IDA has supported development work in 108 countries. Annual commitments have increased steadily and averaged about $15 billion over the last three years, with about 50 percent of commitments going to Africa.

Media Contacts
PRESS RELEASE NO:
2013/437/AFR