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FEATURE STORY

Peru converts waste into energy

January 4, 2013

The treatment plant captures the gases and processes them following Kyoto Protocol regulations.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • In Callao, a newly opened plant treats waste and protects the environment.
  • The plant will reduce carbon emissions by more than 61 tons annually.
  • It will also generate extra income, which will reduce the cost of waste treatment.

The former waste dump known as La Cucaracha has been transformed into a model sanitary landfill with support from the World Bank. It is a modern plant that treats part of the waste produced daily in Lima.

The project, which began in 2003 in coordination with the Municipality of Callao, has the technology to take advantage of gases produced by waste decomposition (CO2e).

The treatment plant captures the gases and processes them following Kyoto Protocol regulations. This facilitates their use in the generation of electric energy or natural gas for vehicle fuel.

The plant reduces CO2e emissions by 61.02 tons per year, significantly helping to mitigate the effects of climate change.

If the project is replicated, it could meet Peru’s high demand for sanitary landfills.

Open Quotes

In the country, more than 70% of solid wastes are improperly disposed of in dumps Close Quotes

Jorge Zegarra
Petramás president

According to Jorge Zegarra, of Petramás (Peruvians Working for a Healthy Environment), “It is a model to apply throughout Peru since more than 70% of the country’s solid wastes are disposed of improperly.”

The additional income generated by the new waste treatment plant will reduce the costs of the service for municipalities and for residents of Lima and Callao.

The implementation of this Clean Development Mechanism makes the functions of a sanitary landfill more important and contributes to mitigating the effects of climate change.