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Deon Filmer

Lead Economist, Development Research Group

Deon Filmer is a Lead Economist in the Research Group at the World Bank and Co-Director of the World Development Report 2018 Learning to Realize Education’s Promise. He has also previously served as Lead Economist in the Human Development department of the Africa Region of the World Bank. He works on issues of human capital and skills, service delivery, and the impact of policies and programs to improve human development outcomes—with research spanning the areas of education, health, social protection, and poverty and inequality. He has published widely in refereed journals, including studies of the impact of demand-side programs on schooling and learning; the roles of poverty, gender, orphanhood, and disability in explaining education inequalities; and the determinants of effective service delivery. He has recently co-authored the following books: Making Schools Work: New Evidence from Accountability Reforms, Youth Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa, and From Mines and Wells to Well-Built Minds: Turning Sub-Saharan Africa's Natural Resource Wealth into Human Capital. He was a core team member of the World Bank's World Development Reports in 1995 Workers in an Integrating World and 2004 Making Services Work for Poor People, and a contributor to 2007’s report Development and the Next Generation. He holds a PhD and MA from Brown University and a BA from Tufts University.

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    World Development Report 2018

    Learning to Realize Education’s Promise
    The World Development Report 2018 (WDR 2018)—LEARNING to Realize Education’s Promise—is the first ever devoted entirely to education. And the timing is excellent: education has long been critical to human welfare, but it is even more so in a time of rapid economic and social change. The best way to equip children and youth for the future is to place their learning at the center. The 2018 WDR explores four main themes: (1) education’s promise; (2) the need to shine a light on learning; (3) how to make schools work for learners; and (4) how to make systems work for learning.
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    From Mines and Wells to Well-Built Minds

    Turning Sub-Saharan Africa's Natural Resource Wealth into Human Capital
    Sub-Saharan Africa's natural resource-rich countries have poor human development. Children in these countries are more likely to die before their first birthday, more likely to be stunted, and less likely to attend school than children in other countries with similar income. Despite the current price downturn, extractives will remain an important part of Sub-Saharan Africa's growth story—using resource rents wisely remains a long term challenge.
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    Youth Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa

    January 2014
    Raising earning potential among Africa’s growing youth population is a major priority for the region that will require strong action on multiple fronts, according to a new World Bank report, Youth Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa. With youth now making up the largest share of the population in most African countries, it is more urgent than ever to pave the way for more productive job opportunities.
Contact
Tel : +1 202 473 1303
Dfilmer@worldbank.org


RESOURCES

AREAS OF EXPERTISE
  • Education
  • Evidence-Based Public Policy
  • Inequality and Shared Prosperity
  • Jobs and Poverty
  • Social Protection and Labor