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Poland: Catching-Up Regions


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Poland is a development success story. However, the country’s regions face wide-ranging challenges. Therefore, Poland has been selected to participate in the “Catching-Up Regions” project, initiated by the European Commission in 2016. These World Bank reports give an overview of the key results of this initiative in Poland.

In June 2018, the World Bank concluded the second phase of the initiative that was focused on the regions of: Podkarpackie, Świętokrzyskie, Małopolskie, Śląskie and Lubelskie.

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Poland: Catching-Up Regions 2

The World Bank, May 2018

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Overview of the Catching-Up Regions initiative results and the next steps.

 

 

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Safer Food, Better Business in Podkarpackie and Lubelskie

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The report provides recommendations on how to improve food inspection practices in Podkarpackie and Lubelskie regions. The report argues that the enforcement of food-related requirements in southeastern Poland could be less burdensome and more effective if inspectorates fully adopted international best practices in regulatory enforcement.

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Podkarpackie and Świetokrzyskie: Towards More Efficient Spatial Planning

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The report provides an overview of the challenges and recommendations related to improving spatial planning in Poland. The Report focuses on two regions and three types of issues related to spatial planning: Functional Urban Area, planning for the gmina and easing the issuance of construction permits (Kielce).

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Fighting Smog: Energy Efficiency and Anti-Smog in Single Family Buildings in Poland

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The report provides a design of financial instruments and delivery mechanisms for the implementation of thermal retrofits and replacement of non-compliant solid fuel boilers in the regions of Malopolskie and Slaskie. The report is intended to help both local authorities and central government in policy actions aimed at improving air quality.

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Podkarpackie Center for Innovation

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The report summarizes the activities and achievements of the World Bank project to design and establish the Podkarpackie Center for Innovation (PCI), a local platform to support innovation and entrepreneurship.

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Poland: Catching-Up Regions

The World Bank, March 2017

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Background

In 2016, the European Commission launched an initiative to identify constraints to growth in the less developed regions of the European Union, and to provide targeted assistance and action - aiming to unlock their growth potential. Poland and Romania were the first countries to pilot this initiative, with two regions selected in each – Świętokrzyskie and Podkarpackie in Poland, and North-West and North-East in Romania.

The European Commission and the World Bank share a long-standing partnership for development, ranging from the joint financing of infrastructure projects to the provision of technical assistance to European Union (EU) and non-EU countries. The European Commission considers the World Bank capable of bringing its technical and operational expertise, as well as its convening power and role as an honest broker, to address some of the constraints facing the lagging regions. It was assumed that by combining its operational expertise with its global knowledge, the World Bank would deliver strategic development outcomes and respond to key development challenges.

Results

Over a year of joint work, the World Bank provided hands-on technical assistance, helping coordinate five activities that were selected by the two Polish regions, in coordination with the European Commission, Poland’s Ministry of Economic Development, and the World Bank. The five selected activities were:

  • Vocational education and training, 
  • Innovations,
  • Activating entrepreneurship,
  • Easier business registration, 
  • Financial instruments.

An overview report summarizing the project and reports for individual activities are available in both English and Polish. 

www.worldbank.org/poland/regions

In 2016, the European Commission launched an initiative to identify constraints to growth in the less developed regions of the European Union, and to provide targeted assistance and action - aiming to unlock their growth potential. Poland and Romania were the first countries to pilot this initiative, with two regions selected in each – Świętokrzyskie and Podkarpackie in Poland, and North-West and North-East in Romania.

The European Commission and the World Bank share a long-standing partnership for development, ranging from the joint financing of infrastructure projects to the provision of technical assistance to European Union (EU) and non-EU countries. The European Commission considers the World Bank capable of bringing its technical and operational expertise, as well as its convening power and role as an honest broker, to address some of the constraints facing the lagging regions. It was assumed that by combining its operational expertise with its global knowledge, the World Bank would deliver strategic development outcomes and respond to key development challenges.

Results

Over a year of joint work, the World Bank provided hands-on technical assistance, helping coordinate five activities that were selected by the two Polish regions, in coordination with the European Commission, Poland’s Ministry of Economic Development, and the World Bank. The five selected activities were:

  • Vocational education and training, 
  • Innovations,
  • Activating entrepreneurship,
  • Easier business registration, 
  • Financial instruments.

An overview report summarizing the project and reports for individual activities are available in both English and Polish. 

www.worldbank.org/poland/regions

In 2016, the European Commission launched an initiative to identify constraints to growth in the less developed regions of the European Union, and to provide targeted assistance and action - aiming to unlock their growth potential. Poland and Romania were the first countries to pilot this initiative, with two regions selected in each – Świętokrzyskie and Podkarpackie in Poland, and North-West and North-East in Romania.

The European Commission and the World Bank share a long-standing partnership for development, ranging from the joint financing of infrastructure projects to the provision of technical assistance to European Union (EU) and non-EU countries. The European Commission considers the World Bank capable of bringing its technical and operational expertise, as well as its convening power and role as an honest broker, to address some of the constraints facing the lagging regions. It was assumed that by combining its operational expertise with its global knowledge, the World Bank would deliver strategic development outcomes and respond to key development challenges.

Results

Over a year of joint work, the World Bank provided hands-on technical assistance, helping coordinate five activities that were selected by the two Polish regions, in coordination with the European Commission, Poland’s Ministry of Economic Development, and the World Bank. The five selected activities were:

  • Vocational education and training, 
  • Innovations,
  • Activating entrepreneurship,
  • Easier business registration, 
  • Financial instruments.

An overview report summarizing the project and reports for individual activities are available in both English and Polish. 

www.worldbank.org/poland/regions

In 2016, the European Commission launched an initiative to identify constraints to growth in the less developed regions of the European Union, and to provide targeted assistance and action - aiming to unlock their growth potential. Poland and Romania were the first countries to pilot this initiative, with two regions selected in each – Świętokrzyskie and Podkarpackie in Poland, and North-West and North-East in Romania.

The European Commission and the World Bank share a long-standing partnership for development, ranging from the joint financing of infrastructure projects to the provision of technical assistance to European Union (EU) and non-EU countries. The European Commission considers the World Bank capable of bringing its technical and operational expertise, as well as its convening power and role as an honest broker, to address some of the constraints facing the lagging regions. It was assumed that by combining its operational expertise with its global knowledge, the World Bank would deliver strategic development outcomes and respond to key development challenges.

Results

Over a year of joint work, the World Bank provided hands-on technical assistance, helping coordinate five activities that were selected by the two Polish regions, in coordination with the European Commission, Poland’s Ministry of Economic Development, and the World Bank. The five selected activities were:

  • Vocational education and training, 
  • Innovations,
  • Activating entrepreneurship,
  • Easier business registration, 
  • Financial instruments.

An overview report summarizing the project and reports for individual activities are available in both English and Polish. 

www.worldbank.org/poland/regions