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Modernizing Weather, Climate and Hydrological Services and Early Warning Systems - Experience of World Bank and Japan
7th Disaster Risk Management Seminar "Modernizing Weather, Climate and Hydrological Services and Early Warning Systems: Experience of World Bank and Japan"
March 14, 2016Tokyo


Disaster Risk Management Seminar Series: co-organized by the World Bank Tokyo Office and World Bank Disaster Risk Management Hub, Tokyo

Hydro-meteorological hazards such as storms, floods, droughts, and heat and cold waves cause the largest proportion of losses from adverse natural events, triggering almost 80 percent of disasters and over 50 percent of disaster-related deaths from 1980 to 2011. The World Bank is rapidly scaling up support to the hydromet sector as effective early warning and hydro-meteorological services are essential to mitigate the adverse impacts of hydro-meteorological hazards. In addition, effective hydro-meteorological services can potentially increase the global productivity of weather-dependant sectors by up to US$ 30 billion per year.

Japan has been providing significant support to this important sector and indeed together Japan and the World Bank account for significant portion of support for hydro-meteorological services globally. In addition to the important donor/financing role that both the Bank and Japan play, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) are one of the most sophisticated National Hydrological Service (NHS) and National Meteorological Service (NMS) in the world, respectively. JMA also plays an important role as global and regional centres providing a number of essential services to NMSs in developing countries especially in Asia and Pacific under the coordination of the World Meteorological Organization.

The seminar will discuss the experience and challenges of hydromet sector development and how to potentially unlock the access to the Japan’s experience in national hydromet modernization programs as well as in development assistance to advance this important agenda.
 

Program

Opening Remarks

Yasusuke Tsukagoshi
Special Representative, Japan, World Bank Group
VIDEO

Presentations

Vladimir Tsirkunov
Lead Specialist, Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery, World Bank
"Towards Effective Partnerships Supporting Weather, Climate and Hydrological Services" PDF | VIDEO

Mitsuhiko Hatori
Director-General, Japan Meteorological Business Support Center, Japan
"Review of Japanese Meteorological Services and Lessons for Developing Countries" PDF | VIDEO

Minoru Kuriki
Director, Research Division II, Foundation of River and Basin Integrated Communications, Japan
"Review of Japanese Hydrological Services" PDF | VIDEO

Mitsuhiko Hatori and Minoru Kuriki
"Modernizing Weather, Climate and Hydrological Services and Early Warning Systems: Emerging Lessons Learned in Japan" PDF | VIDEO

Moderator

Makoto Suwa
Senior Disaster Risk Management Specialist, Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery, World Bank

 

❖ The Seminar will be recorded for later viewing.

Speakers

Our Activities


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ImageYasusuke Tsukagoshi
Special Representative, Japan, World Bank Group

Mr. Yasusuke Tsukagoshi became Special Representative, Japan on August 1, 2013. The Special Representative leads the institutional relationship with the Japanese Government, partners, and stakeholders; oversees the World Bank Tokyo Office; and has responsibility for coordinating and managing outreach and communications programs in Japan. Mr. Tsukagoshi, a Japanese national, has had a long career in Japan’s Ministry of Finance (MOF). Most recently, he served as Director General of Tokyo Customs following senior positions in the Ministry’s Customs and Tariff Bureau. Prior to the Customs’ positions, he had 17 years of experience in international finance and development. From 2008 to 2011 Mr. Tsukagoshi was Executive Director at the Inter-American Development Bank, representing Croatia, Japan, Korea, Portugal, Slovenia, and the United Kingdom, and from 1988 to 1991 he served as Executive Director at the African Development Bank, representing Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Japan, and Saudi Arabia.

 

ImageVladimir Tsirkunov
Lead Specialist, Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery, World Bank

Dr. Vladimir V. Tsirkunov works as a senior environmental engineer in the World Bank’s Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR). Prior to joining the World Bank in 1994, he was the Head of the Laboratory of the Supervision of the USSR (Russian) System of Hydrochemical Monitoring and Water Quality Data Collection. For the past 19 years, he has held progressively more responsible positions with the World Bank related to the preparation, appraisal, and operational supervision of environmental investments, technical assistance, and Global Environment Facility projects. Since 2003, he has been developing new investment operations and analytical products supporting the improvement of weather, climate, and hydrological services. Tsirkunov has a Ph.D. from the Hydrochemical Institute and a Bachelor of Science degree from the Rostov State University, Russian Federation.

 

ImageMitsuhiko Hatori
Director-General, Japan Meteorological Business Support Center

Dr. Hatori has been working as the Director-General of Japan Meteorological Business Support Center (JMBSC) since 2014. Dr. Hatori worked for the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) as Director-General, managing the entire operation of the institution, before joining JMBSC. His 30 years’ experience at JMA includes marine meteorological and climate services, planning and management of meteorological services from the government to private sectors to facilitate the use of meteorological information for the public, stakeholders and various socio-economic activities. He holds D.Sc in Physical Oceanography from Tohoku University.

 

ImageMinoru Kuriki
Director, Research Division II, Foundation of River & Basin Integrated Communications, Japan

As the Director, Research Division II of Foundation of River & Basin Integrated Communications (FRICS), Japan, Mr. Kuriki is managing hydrology-related works including hydrological observation data quality check. Mr. Kuriki worked at the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) for 30 years. During the period, he also served for UN ESCAP from 1988 to 1991 as Flood Control Expert, and Asian Development Bank from 1996 to 1999 as Urban Development Specialist. In 2012 and 2013, he acted as the deputy team leader of the study team of Preparation of Flood Risk Information System of the Chao Phraya River Basin, Thailand. He holds MSc in civil engineering from University of Washington in the field of hydrology.

 

ImageMakoto Suwa
Senior Disaster Risk Management Specialist, Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery, World Bank

Dr. Makoto Suwa is the Hydromet and Disaster Risk Management Specialist leading and supporting a wide range of Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) and World Bank activities and projects, aiming to strengthen weather, climate and hydrological services globally. Prior to joining GFDRR, Dr. Suwa worked for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), both at its headquarters in Geneva and Regional Office for Eastern and Southern Africa in Nairobi, where he mainly developed and managed weather and climate services projects, supported capacity development activities and liaised with stakeholders. He also taught at the Kigali Institute of Science and Technology, and Lycée de Kigali in Rwanda, and briefly worked for the Office for Climate Change of Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in Tokyo. Dr. Suwa holds a Ph.D. and a M.A. in Geosciences (Climate Science) from Princeton University, a Master of Environmental Management degree from Duke University in addition to an undergraduate degree from the University of Tokyo.

(Listed in the order of presentation)

 

World Bank Disaster Risk Management Hub, Tokyo, in corporation with the Government of Japan and Japanese organizations is implementing “Knowledge Program” to share Japanese knowledge and expertise with disaster-prone countries. Under the Program, DRM Hub is summarizing lessons learned from modernization of weather, climate and hydrological services in Japan. This seminar was organized as a part of the Program to showcase the findings from the study.

First, the World Bank’s hydromet specialist introduced the current conditions and challenges facing to improve the weather, climate and hydrological services and early warning systems in developing countries, followed by the presentations of Japanese hydrological and meteorological experts about the possibilities how to overcome the problems in the modernization of weather, climate and hydrological services in developing countries based on the studies and experience of Japan.
 

The World Bank’s Initiatives and Challenges

Yasusuke Tsukagoshi, Special Representative of Japan, World Bank Group opened the seminar, told that not only do weather, climate and hydrological services enhance disaster risk management, but they also contribute to develop economic activities susceptible to climate change. He also mentioned about Jim Yong Kim, President of the World Bank’s speech at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Reduction and Recovery that the World Bank estimated every $1 invested in early warning systems could provide as much as $36 in economic benefits because it could prevent losses to property and businesses.

Vladimir Tsirkunov, Lead Specialist, Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR), World Bank explained that at least $ 15-20 billion investment is required to the basic hydromet services in developing countries in addition to the $ 3-4 billion dollar operational costs. Besides, he pointed about the importance of balanced investment to ensure sustainability, customized system design and capacity building according to the country’s condition. He also added that it is essential to generate good public and private partnership as well as international cooperation.
 

Learning from Japan’s Experience

Mitsuhiko Hatori, Director-General, Japan Meteorological Business Support Center, Japan pointed that modernization of meteorological services in Japan is a result of continuous long-term effort of the nation, with gradual enhancement of human resource development. Dr. Hatori then mentioned about the Meteorological Service Act established in 1952, followed by the description about the need of establishing legislative foundation and long-term vision. He also explained how Japan Meteorological Agency has adopted the science and technologies to incorporate the operation to meet the changing world’s conditions.

Minoru Kuriki, Director, Research Division II, Foundation of River and Basin Integrated Communications, Japan explained about the development of Japan’s hydrological services on the viewpoint of integrated water management and water related DRM. Mr. Kuriki illustrated how Japan has advanced hydromet services with each mega-disaster the nation experienced, and highlighted to use such events as an opportunity to review the legal institutions and operations in order to answer its user’s needs. Mr. Kuriki also mentioned about the flood around Ibaraki prefecture in 2015, and pointed out that not only does the modernization apply to developing countries, but Japan also still have challenges in utilizing hydrological information and data.
 

Modernization of Hydrological and Meteorological Services and Early Warning Systems in Developing Countries

From Japan’s experiences, panelists concluded that continual effort is required along with the mid-/long-term visions to modernize hydromet services and early warning systems in developing countries. Moreover, it is essential to understand each user needs to provide adequate service to the country. Importance of legislation and observation network have also been emphasized. Furthermore, importance of close cooperation with relevant agencies and collaboration between the countries were discussed.

On the day, about 100 participants from government agencies, private sector, academic and research institutions offered valuable opinions from various perspectives as well as their observations and questions for the panel. These discussions will also be reflected to the “Knowledge Note” prepared under the Program.


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EVENT DETAILS
  • DATE/TIME: Monday, March 14, 2016, 04:00PM - 05:30PM (JST)

VENUE:
The World Bank Tokyo Office
10th Floor, Fukoku Seimei Building, 2-2-2 Uchisaiwaicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan
MAP

LANGUAGE:
English and Japanese
(with simultaneous interpretation)

INQUIRIES:
World Bank Disaster Risk Management Hub, Tokyo
EMAIL: drmhubtokyo@worldbank.org
TEL: 03-3597-1320


Japan-World Bank Program for Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Management in Developing Countries