Learn how the World Bank Group is helping countries with COVID-19 (coronavirus). Find Out

Skip to Main Navigation
BRIEF February 14, 2019

Building Resilience in Africa

Image

Photo Credit: World Bank


CONTEXT:

Africa has made notable progress in the last three decades. Life expectancy has risen steadily, school enrollment has grown, and carbon emissions have steadily remained well below global averages.

Amidst these achievements, managing disaster risks and urban challenges is key to ensuring that Africa’s development achievements are not lost when disasters hit. About 90% of all disasters in Africa are weather and climate driven. By 2030, up to 118 million extremely poor people in Africa, living on less than $1.25 a day, will be exposed to cyclones, drought, floods, earthquakes, extreme heat and extreme weather conditions.

The World Bank, Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) and partners are working with African governments and communities to build resilience in key urban and rural areas throughout the continent. The objective is to assist Africa in taking positive steps toward reaching its growth potential, scaling up its economic achievements, and fostering resilience against climate, urban and disaster risks.

RESPONSE:

Africa’s growing population and urbanization presents an opportunity for a turning point towards equitable growth and progress. With evolving demographic growth and Africa’s urbanization rate, about 70% of Africa’s urban areas and cities are yet to be built. It presents opportunities for the private and public sectors to collaborate and invest in people, communities and cities—but cities must be well managed to attract private capital.

The Africa DRM program sought to primarily implement activities under a regional approach. The program or strategy is aligned with World Bank Corporate Initiatives such as: the World Bank Group’s Climate Change Action Plan 2016-2020, the Africa Climate Business Plan (ACBP) and the Action Plan on Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience.

The PA contributes to:

 

Last Updated: Mar 03,2020


MULTIMEDIA

VIDEO Sep 17,2019

From A Shared Vision of the Coast Toward A Sustainable Reality

All along the West African coast, communities are starting to preserve and protect their shared coastal resources and work towards enhancing resilience. The WACA Program fosters scaled up investments to solve coastal problems while encouraging regional cooperation and planning. International partners are working with coastal communities and governments to adopt strong policies and enable durable solutions for coastal protection, and increase economic opportunities.

STRATEGY:

The Africa DRM program contributes to the achievement of the twin goals: eliminating extreme poverty by 2030 and boosting shared prosperity. 

The strategy has increased the financial resilience of Africa’s governments and private sectors by providing financial solutions to investments in risk reduction projects and implementing new risk transfer mechanisms. Under this strategy, in FY19 the World Bank leveraged a total of US$3,498 million (59% ongoing, 41% still in pipeline) to support vulnerable countries in achieving disaster-resilient and climate-smart development.

Image

The strategy is structured in four pillars:

  1. DRM Policy and Strategy Support for Ministries of Finance raises awareness of disaster risk impact on long term growth. Products developed inform potential financial solutions based on a country-tailored strategy for quick mobilization of resources to improve financial resilience. The team has supported the preparation of a DRF National agenda for 18 countries (Benin, Kenya, Cabo Verde, Lesotho, Eswatini, Madagascar, Mozambique, Malawi, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe); the preparation and/or implementation of disaster risk financing policies/strategies in 6 countries (Mozambique, Cabo Verde, Benin, Malawi, Kenya and Ethiopia) and instruments (i.e. contingent lines of credits, emergency funds, shock responsive safety nets, crop and livestock insurance programs, among others.) See results of Pillar 1 here 
    Image
  2. Strengthening Urban Resilience in Africa maximizes finance for development by promoting crowd-in private investments, more efficient government services, and the changing role of government-as-a-platform. Investment designs minimize disaster risks under a spatial multi-sectoral approach. Moreover, the activities provide capacity building and digital tools to improve governance and city management. Open Cities Africa supported projects in 12 cities in Sub-Saharan Africa, including: Antananarivo, Madagascar; Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; Ngaoundere, Cameroon; Victoria, Seychelles; Saint-Louis, Senegal, Stone Town, Zanzibar; Brazzaville, Republic of Congo; Pointe-Noire, Republic of Congo; Accra, Ghana; Kampala, Uganda and Monrovia, Liberia. Under the City Resilience Program, 19 African cities have received City Scans (Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Mali, The Gambia, Malawi, Benin, Tanzania, Cameroon, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Nigeria, Uganda, Rwanda, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Mozambique, Liberia and Kenya) resulting in various outcomes and follow-up engagements. See results of Pillar 2 here 
    Image
  3. Modernizing Hydromet Services offer capacity building opportunities and enhance regional knowledge to improve early warning systems to climate related disasters, based on accurate hydrological and meteorological information and services. The use of new and innovative technologies within the projects foster human capital, sustainable development, and long term resilience. With technical assistance support financed by GFDRR, the World Bank has programmed about $200 million for active and upcoming hydromet investment projects. Most of the technical assistance support is financed with $11.3 million from the Climate Risks and Early Warning Systems – CREWS initiative See results of Pillar 3 here 
    Image
  4. Strengthening Resilient Recovery focuses on reducing vulnerability and building back better by conducting qualitative and quantitative post-disaster risks assessments. These activities inform post disaster responses and provide social and economic opportunities in large vulnerable low-income areas while building the foundations for better management aiming for resilient communities that attract private investment. During FY19, GFDRR’s Just-In-Time Recovery Facility provided on-demand and accelerated post-disaster support to Zimbabwe, Malawi, Mozambique and Comoros which were severely damaged after the 2019 Cyclone Idai and Kenneth. This technical assistance enabled the four countries to mobilize $630 million IDA grants and credits from the Crisis Response Window for furthering recovery and reconstruction work. 

Last Updated: Mar 03,2020


MULTIMEDIA

Image
click
VIDEO

Drones Help to Understand Flood Risk

The Tanzania Urban Resilience Program is using an innovative combination of Light Detection and Range (LiDAR) UAV (or drone) surveying and bathometric surveying to support flood modelling within the flood-prone Msimbazi river basin. Outputs will be used to guide river upgrades that will improve Dar es Salaam’s resilience to flooding.


MULTIMEDIA

Image
click
VIDEO

St. Louis, Senegal: Coastal Communities Facing Waves of Change

Saint Louis’s coastal community is losing ground to the ocean each year, and families are losing their possessions, food and homes to coastal erosion, flooding, even breaking waves. But West Africa’s countries are working together, with the support of WACA, to create new solutions to protect the most vulnerable.