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Expanding Opportunities for Private Sector to Promote New Growth Model in Tajikistan

May 23, 2014


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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • International Finance Corporation loan of US$1.3 million helps set up local confectionary production company in Tajikistan.
  • Focus is on supporting entrepreneurs and helping the local markets reduce their dependence on imports.
  • Company seeing high demand and planning to accelerate production.

Who doesn’t like a story with a sweet ending?

Established by Tajero group of companies, an importer and distributor of food products in Tajikistan, LLC Amiri confectionary plant started its operations in 2011 with the help of a US$1.3 million loan from the International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the Word Bank Group. Today, Amiri holds a leading position in the market with a diversified product range consisting of more than 40 types of chocolate and sweets.  

Private sector development is one of World Bank Group’s priorities in Tajikistan.  The World Bank is helping remove key constraints to business development and investment by simplifying business registration and construction permitting processes, improving regulations and infrastructure underlying access to financial services, and encouraging development of the mining industry, where Tajikistan has a competitive advantage.

The new Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) for Tajikistan aims to expand opportunities for individuals and private businesses and provide the foundation for a new growth model focused on private sector-led investment and exports.  The objectives of the CPS are sweet news for Amiri.


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 Today, Amiri holds a leading position in the market with a diversified product range consisting of more than 40 types of chocolate and sweets.




" Previously, good, high quality sweets were unavailable in the local market. We had to import them. The price was high, which didn’t allow everybody to buy those sweets. Also, there was no place for creativity. Today, people have a choice to buy expensive, imported sweets or cheaper local sweets, which compare to imported ones in taste and quality, and assortment. Although we still import raw chocolate and other ingredients, except dried fruits, our products are cheaper than imported ones and people appreciate that. "

Saida Mirozorova

Director of Amiri

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Amiri started its operations in 2011 with the help of a US$1.3 million loan from the International Finance Corporation, a member of the Word Bank Group.


IFC also assisted Amiri enhance its environmental and social standards and disseminate successful production practices in the local market. It will also provide training to implement international standards for resource efficiency, quality and safety.

The company currently produces 80 tons of chocolate and other sweets every month. Thanks to demand and increasing market share, it now plans to accelerate production up to 100 tons per month in 2014.

As part of those plans, the company is preparing to open another store in about a month, which will also help add jobs. Today, Amiri employs 70 people, and the new shop will add 30 more. The company also hopes to construct another confectionery in the next five years and to export its products to neighboring countries such as the Russian Federation, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyz Republic, according to Mirozorova.


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The company currently produces 80 tons of chocolate and other sweets every month. Thanks to demand and increasing market share, it now plans to accelerate production up to 100 tons per month.