FEATURE STORY

Quality basic education to brighten peruvians' future

February 14, 2013


The video Beyond the ABC and 123: Skills for Peruvians of the 21st Century highlight the importance of developing socio-emotional skills for employability.

World Bank Group

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The World Bank recently disbursed a US$ 25 million loan to Peru.
  • The project will enable the proper evaluation of education throughout the country.
  • It has been demonstrated that the skills developed during school years are crucial for an individual’s future success.

Peru has experienced solid economic growth in recent years (5.7% between 2010 and 2011) and employment indicators are more positive than they have been in decades. But the country still has marked social inequality, as evidenced by its Gini Index of 0.481 in 2010.

To achieve equitable development, the Peruvian government is focusing on education. On the last evaluation conducted by the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA - 2009), which tested a national sample of 15-year-old students, Peru ranked near the bottom of the list of 65 countries in math, reading comprehension and science.

In 2011, the study "Strengthening skills and employability in Peru” determined that in addition to professional training, individuals required other types of skills, including socio-cultural ones, which are highly valued by employers, to successfully enter the Peruvian labor market.

These skills are developed during the first days of life and during the basic education phase, in other words, during the 12 years of pre-school, primary and secondary school.

"What you learn at school is useful throughout life. Your skills and behavior as an adult are not only greatly influenced by reading, but also by the laughs, frustrations and achievements that you experience as a child,” says Gabriela Chumpitaz, director of the Pinoteca Project, which the World Bank awarded in 2009 for its learning activities created for children living in Cerro el Pino, a poor neighborhood in La Victoria District of Lima.

While enrolment in pre-school has increased since 2008 (from 73% to 78%), other associated factors, such as nutrition or access to health, can affect child development. However, access to quality basic education is a key factor for achieving Peru’s further development.


" What you learn at school is useful throughout life. Your skills and behavior as an adult are not only greatly influenced by reading, but also by the laughs, frustrations and achievements that you experience as a child. "

Gabriela Chumpitaz

Director of the Pinoteca Project

Supporting early education

In Peru, developing human capital is crucial for achieving sustained economic growth. The recent $25 million loan to Peru will contribute to the implementation of an educational strategy that will benefit some six million students in 40,000 schools around the country.

The Strategic Learning Achievements Program was launched in coordination with the Ministry of Education. This program will monitor and evaluate the reforms implemented to improve education quality and learning in the country.

Students’ progress will be measured through ongoing evaluations, which will focus on identifying the impact of the programs that have been implemented. These evaluations will also help determine which schools require more support and resources to allocate them efficiently. In addition, the program will contribute to closing the major education gaps existing in the country today.

Finally, the program will also monitor teaching practices in the classroom and implement a system for the selection and training of school principals.

All of these activities will enable students to develop the different types of skills, both cognitive and socio-emotional, that are crucial for their future success in the labor market.



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