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Events

World Bank Hosts Global Book Launch of ‘What a Waste 2.0’

September 27, 2018

Tokyo, Japan

Joint organizers: The World Bank (GSURR/TDLC) in collaboration with the Government of Japan (GoJ)

  • The first global book launch of “What a Waste 2.0” report, developed by Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) under the auspices of the Global Practice for Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience, World Bank takes place on September 27, 2018, from 5pm to 6:30pm at World Bank’s TDLC in Tokyo, Japan.

    By 2050, the world is expected to nearly double waste generation to 3.76 billion tonnes of waste annually, from today’s 2.10 billion tonnes. Key challenges that make sustainable waste management a complicated proposition include costly and complex waste operations, unavailability or inaccuracy of waste data, management by local authorities that usually have limited resources and limited capacities in planning, contract management, and operational monitoring. Rapid urbanization and population growth in low and middle-income countries pose additional threat to planning for waste management, in which case the availability and accuracy of data on waste generation and types of waste generated is a challenge. 

    For planning and managing waste operations, dependence on data and statistics is critical to allow governments to select appropriate management methods and plan for future demand. With accurate data, governments can realistically allocate budget and land, assess relevant technologies, and consider strategic partners for service provision, such as the private sector or non-governmental organizations.

    What a Waste 2.0: A Global Snapshot of Solid Waste Management to 2050 presents national and urban waste management data from around the world and highlights the need for urgent action. The publication provides a snapshot on how waste generation and management varies across income levels and regions, and shares good practices globally. The report is the second of its edition since the first global report published in 2012 and draws on information and lessons from 217 countries and economies and over 360 cities.

    Solid waste management is one of the most important urban services, yet it is complex and expensive, accounting for approximately 20% of municipal budgets in low-income countries, on average. Costly and complex waste operations must compete for funding with other priorities such as clean water and other utilities, education, and healthcare. Waste management is often managed by local authorities with limited resources and limited capacities in planning, contract management and operational monitoring. These factors make sustainable waste management a complicated proposition on the path of economic development and most low and middle-income countries and their cities are struggling to address the challenges.

    Waste management data is critical to creating policy and planning for the local context. Understanding how much waste is generated—especially with rapid urbanization and population growth—as well as the types of waste being generated allows for local governments to select appropriate management methods and plan for future demand. It allows governments to design a system with a suitable number of vehicles, establish efficient routes, set targets for diversion of waste, track progress, and adapt as consumption patterns change. With accurate data, governments can realistically allocate budget and land, assess relevant technologies, and consider strategic partners for service provision such as the private sector or non-governmental organizations.

    What a Waste 2.0 publication strives to provide the latest and most realistic information available to empower citizens and governments around the world to take action and address the pressing global crisis of waste.

    Program and Speakers

    1. Introduction of the panelists
      Daniel Levine, TDLC, WB
    2. Executive Summary of "What a Waste 2.0" report
      Silpa Kaza, Urban Development Specialist, WB
    3. Findings from key sections
      Frank Van Woerden, Lead Environmental Engineer, WB
    4. Findings from key sections
      Shiko Hayashi, Program Director, Institution for Global Environment Strategies (IGES)
    5. Comments on presentations
      Sameh Wahba, Director, Urban and Territorial Development, WB and JICA representative
      Sei Kondo, Director, Global Environment Department, JICA
    6. Discussion and Q&A
    7. Closing Remarks  

     

Event Details

  • Date/Time: Thursday, September 27, 2018, 5:00pm - 6:30pm (JST)
  • VENUE: World Bank's Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC), 10th Floor, Fukoku Seimei Building, 2-2-2 Uchisaiwaicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan (Please refer "ACCESS" in RELATED below)
  • ADMISSION: Free
  • REGISTRATION: To participate, please register through the form below. If the registration form does not work, please email to the contact address with your full name, company name, division name and email address.
  • CONTACT: Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) Mariko Tanaka, Haruka Imoto TEL: 03-3597-1333
  • mtanaka1@worldbank.org
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