Events
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Second Generation Productivity Analysis and Policy
October 18-19, 2016World Bank J Building, JB1-080, 701 18th St NW, Washington, DC 20006

Join us for a conference bringing together experts working at the frontier of productivity analysis to discuss conceptual and measurement advances and implications for our knowledge agenda and operations.

Tuesday, 18 October 2016

9:00- 9:45 am Breakfast
9:45- 10:00 am

Opening Remarks:

Jan Walliser, Vice President, Equitable Growth, Finance & Institutions (EFI)

10:00- 11:00 am                                                                                                                                                                       

Session l:  The Importance of Productivity for Economic Growth and the Global Productivity Slump

We will discuss the role that productivity growth plays for economic growth, emphasizing the importance of microeconomic evidence to explain the behavior of macroeconomic variables. We will also discuss the debate about the global productivity slump and offer new evidence to resolve the debate. The world has seen massive technological progress in IT, which should lead to greater efficiencies and more output; but this hasn’t translated into higher rates of productivity growth. In order to resolve this paradox, one of the possible explanations is that this perceived slowness is just an illusion caused by mismeasurement of our modern economy.

Chair: William F. Maloney, Chief Economist, EFI
Panelists: 

John Haltiwanger, Professor of Economics, University of Maryland

Chad Syverson, J. Baum Harris Professor of Economics, University of Chicago, Booth School of Business

11:00- 11:30 am Coffee break & informal discussions
11:30- 1:00 pm

Session II: Structural Change and Productivity Growth

We will discuss the role of structural transformation for economic growth. The session will synthesize and evaluate recent advances in the research agenda on structural transformation as well as new and sharper insights for understanding economic development, regional income convergence, and aggregate productivity under this framework. The session will also discuss how countries have reduced the misallocation of factors of production across sectors in order to stem negative effects on aggregate productivity growth.

Chair:      Carlos Felipe Jaramillo, Sr. Director, Macroeconomic & Fiscal Management
Panelists:   

Chang-Tai Hsieh, Phyllis and Irwin Winkelried Professor of Economics, The University of Chicago Booth Business School

Richard Rogerson, Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School

Diego Restuccia, Professor of Economics, Toronto University

 

1:00- 2:30 pm Lunch & ECB Poster Session
2:30- 3:30 pm

Session III: A Micro Framework for Productivity Analysis: Bringing Demand Back in

We will present a new empirical micro-framework to analyze firm performance. The session will discuss recent work on measuring the impact of economic shocks on firm performance using this new framework. The analytical framework nests most empirical approaches to estimating the impact of industrial policies on firms active in international markets. The speakers will talk about outstanding issues surrounding the identification of the underlying mechanisms and will conclude with suggestions for future research.

Chair: Romain Duval, Advisor to the Chief Economist, International Monetary Fund (IMF)
Panelists:  

Jan De Loecker, Professor of Economics and International Affairs, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School

Penny Goldberg, Professor of Economics, Yale University

 

3:30- 4:00 pm Coffee break & informal discussions
4:00- 5:00 pm

Session IV: Internal Determinants of Productivity Growth (Skills, Innovation, and Technology)

We will discuss the role of internal determinants on aggregate productivity growth and income differences across countries. A long-standing question is whether differences in management practices, innovation efforts, and efficiency in the allocation of talent within a firm can explain differences in aggregate productivity, especially in developing countries, where these spreads seem particularly large. The speakers will synthesize the most relevant evidence and will conclude with suggestions for future research.

Chair: Mary Hallward-Driemeir, Sr. Advisor, Trade and Competitiveness
Panelists:

Nick Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University

Ufuk Akcigit, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Chicago

 

Wednesday, 19 October 2016

8:30- 9:00 am Breakfast
9:00- 10:30 am                                                                                                                                                                           

Session V: External Determinants of Productivity Growth (Competition, Agglomeration, Finance)

We will discuss the channels through which domestic competition in product and factor markets affect aggregate productivity, emphasizing competition’s role in encouraging firms to upgrade their internal capabilities and its contribution to allocative efficiency. We will also discuss the role and mechanisms through which agglomeration economies affect productivity. The discussion will conclude with an overview of the linkages between financing development and aggregate productivity growth.

Chair: Asli Demirguc-Kunt, Director, Development Economics Research Group
Panelists:

Jo Van Biesebroeck, Professor of Economics, University of Leuven

Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, Professor of Economics, Princeton University

Joseph Kaboski, David F. and Erin M. Seng Foundation Professor of Economics, University of Notre Dame

10:30- 11:00 am  Coffee break & informal discussions
11:00- 12:00 pm

Session VI: Productivity for Trade Growth

International trade interacts with productivity along multiple dimensions. For instance, international competition generates overall pressure on firms to perform better and specialize. At the same time, just a few of the largest and most productive firms are able to seriously engage in highly complex global markets, thus triggering resource reallocations across firms. We will briefly recall how most recent macro-trade models can successfully incorporate the critical empirical evidence that firms are intrinsically very heterogeneous in characteristics and performance. In closing, the speakers will also indicate most promising directions of research and their policy relevance.

Chair:      Filippo di Mauro, Senior Adviser, Research Department of the European Central Bank (ECB) and Chairman of CompNet
Panelists:   

Marc Melitz, Professor of Economics, Harvard University

Andrew Bernard, Professor of Economics, Dartmouth College

 

12:00- 1:00 pm

Session VIII: Productivity in Agriculture

We will consider areas of research that have been relatively understudied, yet appear critical to understanding agricultural development and rural poverty alleviation. These areas include the relationship between technology capital and agriculture productivity growth, measurement of agricultural risk and its consequences for the misallocation of resources, and inferences about investment returns as well as the assessment of interventions aimed at improving agricultural productivity on agricultural wages and thus on inequality and the welfare of the poorest of the rural poor.

Chair: Ana Revenga, Sr. Director, Poverty
Panelists:  

Keith Owen Fuglie, Economist, USDA-Economic Research Service

Mark Rosenzweig, Frank Altschul Professor of International Economics; Director, Economic Growth Center, Yale University

 

1:00- 1:30 pm Closing Remarks: William F. Maloney, Chief Economist, EFI
1:30- 2:30 pm Lunch
2:30- 5:30 pm Workshop on commissioned Papers
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    William F. Maloney

    Chief Economist, Equitable Growth, Finance and Institutions, World Bank Group
    William F. Maloney is Chief Economist for Equitable Growth, Finance and Institutions in the World Bank Group. Previously he was Chief Economist for Trade and Competitiveness and Global Lead on Innovation and Productivity. Prior to the Bank, he was a Professor of Economics at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (1990-1997) and then joined, working as Lead Economist in the Office of the Chief Economist for Latin America until 2009. From 2009 to 2014, he was Lead Economist in the Development Economics Research Group. From 2011 to 2014 he was Visiting Professor at the University of the Andes and worked closely with the Colombian government on innovation and firm upgrading issues. Mr. Maloney received his PhD in economics from the University of California Berkeley (1990), his BA from Harvard University (1981), and he studied at the University of the Andes in Bogota, Colombia (1982-83). He has published on issues related to international trade and finance, developing country labor markets, and innovation and growth. In addition to publications in academic journals, he coauthored Natural Resources: Neither Curse nor Destiny and Lessons from NAFTA, Does What you Export Matter: In Search of Empirical Guidance for Industrial Policy, as well as several flagship publications of the Latin American division of the Bank, most recently Informality: Exit and Exclusion.
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    Ufuk Akcigit

    Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Chicago
    As a macroeconomist, Ufuk Akcigit's research centers on economic growth, productivity, firm dynamics and economics of innovation. Before joining the University of Chicago, Akcigit was an Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania. In addition, he serves as a Faculty Research Fellow in the National Bureau of Economic Research. Akcigit has received several awards for both research and teaching. In 2014 he was named a Kauffman Junior Faculty Fellow and in 2016 he received Kiel Institute Excellence Award in Global Economic Affairs in recognition of his outstanding scholarship. Akcigit received his BSc in economics from Koc University in Istanbul. He then went on to earn his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2009.
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    Asli Demirguc-Kunt

    Director of Research, World Bank
    After joining the Bank in 1989 as a Young Economist, Asli Demirguc-Kunt has held different positions, including Director of Development Policy, Chief Economist of Financial and Private Sector Development Network, and Senior Research Manager, doing research and advising on financial sector and private sector development issues. She is the lead author of World Bank Policy Research Report 2007, Finance for All? Policies and Pitfalls in Expanding Access and has also created the World Bank’s Global Financial Development Report. The author of over 100 publications, she has published widely in academic journals. Her research has focused on the links between financial development and firm performance and economic development. Banking crises, financial regulation, access to financial services and inclusion including SME finance are among her areas of research. She has been the President of International Atlantic Economic Society (2013-14) and Director of Western Economic Association (2015-18). Prior to coming to the Bank, she was an Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. She holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in economics from the Ohio State University.
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    Andrew B. Bernard

    Professor of International Economics, Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth
    Professor Bernard is an expert in international trade and investment and specializes in firm responses to globalization. His recent research focuses on firm connections across borders and the impact of global supply chains on firm performance. Professor Bernard was named by Thompson Reuters as one of the World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds in 2014 and 2015 and is among the 100 most cited economists. In addition to being published in leading academic journals, his research has been featured on CNN, CNBC, Good Morning America, MSNBC, NPR's Morning Edition, the Marketplace Morning Report, the BBC, and in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, the Economist, Nikkei, Fortune, and Bloomberg Business Week. He received his A.B from Harvard and his Ph.D. from Stanford in economics.
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    Nicholas Bloom

    Professor of Economics, Stanford University
    Nick Bloom is the William Eberle Professor of Economics at Stanford University, a Senior Fellow of SIEPR, and a Co-Director of the Productivity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship program at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on management practices and uncertainty. He previously worked at the UK Treasury and McKinsey & Company. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the recipient of awards including an Alfred Sloan Fellowship, the Bernacer Prize, the European Investment Bank prize, the Frisch Medal, the Kauffman Medal and a National Science Foundation Career Award. He has a BA from Cambridge, an MPhil from Oxford, and a PhD from UCL. On the personal side he is English, living with his Scottish wife and American kids on Stanford campus, in a multi-lingual English household.
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    C. Felipe Jaramillo

    Senior Director, Macroeconomics and Fiscal Management Global Practice, World Bank
    C. Felipe Jaramillo is the Senior Director of the World Bank Group’s Macroeconomics and Fiscal Management Global Practice (MFM). In this position, Mr. Jaramillo leads a team of over 350 country economists and macroeconomics experts, providing integrative development strategies, policy-based lending, macro data, global perspectives, real-time policy analysis, country risk assessments, and innovative projection tools to countries around the world. Before this, Mr. Jaramillo was Director of Strategy and Operations in the Office of the Managing Director and Chief Operating Officer and the Senior Vice President for Operations. Since joining the Bank, in 2002, he has been Country Director for the Central America countries (Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama); Country Director for the Andean countries (Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela); Sector Manager in the Poverty Reduction and Economic Management (PREM) network in the Europe and Central Asia region and Lead Economist for Central America. Before joining the Bank, Mr. Jaramillo was a public servant in the Government of Colombia, holding offices in the Ministry of Finance, the National Planning Department and the Ministry of Trade. Mr. Jaramillo holds a Ph. D. in Development Economics from Stanford University. He has taught at the Department of Economics of the Universidad de Los Andes in Bogota and at the University of Maryland College Park.
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    Chad Syverson

    J. Baum Harris Professor of Economics, University of Chicago Booth School of Business
    Chad Syverson's research spans several topics, with a particular focus on the interactions of firm structure, market structure, and productivity. He also coauthored (with Austan Goolsbee and Steve Levitt) an intermediate-level text, Microeconomics. Syverson serves as an editor of the RAND Journal of Economics and is on the editorial board of several other journals. He is also a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Syverson earned two bachelor's degrees in 1996 from the University of North Dakota, one in economics and one in mechanical engineering. He earned his PhD in economics in 2001 from the University of Maryland. Syverson joined the Chicago faculty in 2001.
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    Chang-Tai Hsieh

    Phyllis and Irwin Winkelried Professor of Economics and PCL Faculty Scholar
    Chang-Tai Hsieh conducts research on growth and development. Hsieh has published several papers in top economic journals, including “The Life-Cycle of Plants in India and Mexico,” in the Quarterly Journal of Economics; "Misallocation and Manufacturing TFP in China and India," in the Quarterly Journal of Economics; "Relative Prices and Relative Prosperity," in the American Economic Review; "Can Free Entry be Ine”cient? Fixed Commissions and Social Waste in the Real Estate Industry," in the Journal of Political Economy; and "What Explains the Industrial Revolution in East Asia? Evidence from the Factor Markets," in the American Economic Review. Hsieh has been a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Banks of San Francisco, New York, and Minneapolis, as well as the World Bank's Development Economics Group and the Economic Planning Agency in Japan. He is a Research Associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research, a Senior Fellow at the Bureau for Research in Economic Analysis of Development, and a member of the Steering Group of the International Growth Center in London. He is the recipient of an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship, an Elected Member of Academia Sinica, and the recipient of the Sun Ye-Fang award for research on the Chinese economy.
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    Romain Duval

    Research Department Advisor, IMF
    Romain Duval is an Advisor in the IMF Research Department, where he leads the agenda on structural reforms. Previously he was the Division Chief for Regional Studies of the Asia Pacific Department, where he was the editor of the Regional Economic Outlook for the region and in charge of the research on regional issues. Prior to joining the Fund he was the Division Chief for Structural Surveillance at the OECD Economics Department, where he was the editor of the OECD flagship publication Going for Growth and supervised research teams. Earlier on, he served as an adviser to the OECD Chief Economist. He has published widely in leading academic and policy-oriented journals on a broad range of topics including the economics of labor and product market regulation, growth, business cycles, trade, the political economy of reforms, monetary policy, equilibrium real exchange rates, and climate change mitigation. He holds a PhD in Economics from University Paris-I-Sorbonne.
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    Jan Walliser

    Vice President, Equitable Growth, World Bank
    Jan Walliser is the World Bank Vice President for Equitable Growth, Finance and Institutions. His Vice Presidency offers clients a wide set of options to: make their economies more productive, competitive, and attractive for private investment; increase access to finance; manage their fiscal deficits and debt; get new facts on poverty; or grow their public sector management capacity. Previously, Mr. Walliser was the Director of Strategy and Operations in the Bank’s Africa Region where he provided strategic leadership and operational guidance to staff operating. Before joining the Bank, he was an economist at the IMF and a Principal Analyst at the U.S. Congressional Budget Office. Mr. Walliser has published in economic journals on intergenerational aspects of fiscal policy, tax reform, pension reform, and aid effectiveness. He received a Ph.D. in economics from Boston University and a Diplom-Volkswirt from Kiel University, Germany. A German national, he speaks German, English, and French.
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    Esteban Rossi-Hansberg

    Theodore A. Well '29 Professor of Economics, Princeton University
    Esteban Rossi-Hansberg is the Theodore A. Well '29 Professor of Economics at Princeton University, where he has been since 2005. Prior to Princeton he was an Assistant Professor at Stanford University. He obtained a PhD from the University of Chicago in 2002. His research specializes in international trade, regional and urban economics, as well as growth and organizational economics. He has published extensively in all the major journals in economics. In 2007 he received the Alfred Sloan Research Fellowship and in 2010 he received the August Lösch Prize and the Geoffrey Hewings Award. He is a member of the NBER and CEPR and is, or has been, an associate editor of the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the American Economic Review, the Journal of Monetary Economics and the Journal of Urban Economics, among other journals.
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    Filippo di Mauro

    Visiting Fellow, Business School of the National University of Singapore
    Filippo di Mauro is Visiting Fellow at the Business School of the National University of Singapore, and Chairperson of CompNet http://www.ecb.europa.eu/home/html/researcher_compnet.en.html, a large research network on competitiveness and productivity among central banks, major international organizations and academic institutes. His present research and teaching agenda includes: 1) Productivity and resource reallocation using firm level data; and 2) Modelling global linkages and business cycle forecast, including global value chains. Filippo di Mauro has more than 30 years of applied economic experience as economist and research manager in Central Banks (Bank of Italy (1984-1990, 1996-98), US Federal Reserve Board (May-September 2010), European Central Bank (1998-2016)) and International Development organisations (Asian Development Bank (1990-94), IMF (1986-88, 1994-96)). He joined the ECB since the start of its operations in 1998 where he directed for more than a decade the international economic analysis and the global economy forecast in its Economics department to then move to the management of its Research department. Professor di Mauro has a wide record of publications, including in academic journals such as the Journal of Applied Econometrics, Journal of International Money and Finance, Economic Policy. An economics graduate of University of Rome, di Mauro holds an MA and a PhD in Economics, from the University of Chicago and the American University, respectively.
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    Keith Fuglie

    Branch chief and research economist, U.S. Department of Agriculture
    Keith Fuglie works with the Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington, DC, where he has served as branch chief and research economist specializing in the economics of technological change and science policy. In 2012 Keith was recognized with the USDA Secretary’s Honor Award for Professional Service, and in 2014 he received the Bruce Gardner Memorial Prize for Applied Policy Analysis from the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association. During 1997-98 Keith served as senior staff economist on the White House Council of Economic Advisers. Keith also spent ten years with the International Potato Center (CIP) stationed in Indonesia and Tunisia, where he headed CIP’s social science research program and was regional representative for CIP in Asia. Keith received an MS and PhD in Agricultural and Applied Economics from the University of Minnesota and a BA from Concordia College, Moorhead, Minnesota.
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    Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg

    William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Economics, Yale University
    Pinelopi (Penny) Koujianou Goldberg is the William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Economics at Yale University and Editor-in-Chief of the American Economic Review. She is Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in 2010-11 and the Bodossaki Prize in Social Sciences in 2003, Elected Fellow of the Econometric Society, Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), and Board Member of the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD). She has published numerous articles in the areas of applied microeconomics, international trade, and industrial organization. Her current research interests include the effects of trade liberalization on growth and the income distribution, the effects of intellectual property rights enforcement in developing countries, and the determinants of incomplete exchange rate pass-through. She holds a Diplom in Economics from the University of Freiburg, Germany and a Ph.D in Economics from Stanford University.
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    Mary Hallward-Driemeier

    Senior Economic Adviser, Trade & Competitiveness Global Practice, World Bank
    Mary Hallward-Driemeier is the Senior Economic Adviser in the Trade & Competitiveness Global Practice at the World Bank, overseeing its analytical agenda. A Canadian national, she joined the World Bank in 1997 as a Young Professional. She has published widely on entrepreneurship, firm productivity and firm dynamics, the impact of financial crises, and women's economic empowerment. She has served as an advisor to the Chief Economist of the World Bank, a co-manager of the Jobs Group, the Deputy Director for the World Development Report 2005: A Better Investment Climate for Everyone and is a founding member of the Microeconomics of Growth Network. Her latest book is Empowering Women: Legal Rights and Economic Opportunities in Africa. Mary received her A.B. from Harvard University, her M.Sc. in Development Economics from Oxford University where she was a Rhodes Scholar, and her Ph.D. in Economics from M.I.T.
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    Joseph P. Kaboski

    David F. and Erin M. Seng Foundation Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics, University of Notre Dame
    Joseph P. Kaboski is the David F. and Erin M. Seng Foundation Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at the University of Notre Dame. His research focuses on growth, development and international economics, with an emphasis on structural change, finance and development, microfinance, and international trade. He has published numerous articles in top journals, and in 2012 he was awarded the prestigious Frisch Medal, awarded biannually for the best paper in the journal Econometrica over the previous five years. He is a Research Associate of the NBER, and a Fellow and Board Member of the Bureau of Research in Economics Analysis of Development. He has consulted for the Federal Reserve Banks of Chicago, Minneapolis, and St. Louis; the World Bank; the International Monetary Fund; and is a Senior Advisor and Board Member to the research department of the Central Bank of Armenia. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago in 2001.
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    Marc Melitz

    David A. Wells Professor of Political Economy, Harvard University
    Marc Melitz is the David A. Wells Professor of Political Economy at Harvard University. He holds a B.A. from Haverford College (1989), an M.S.B.A. from the Robert Smith School of Business (1992), and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan (2000). He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and is affiliated with the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), CESifo, and the Kiel Institute for the World Economy. His broad research interests are in international trade and investment. More specifically, he studies producer-level responses to globalization and their implications for aggregate trade and investment patterns. His research has been funded by the Sloan Foundation and by the NSF.
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    Diego Restuccia

    Canada Research Chair in Macroeconomics and Productivity and a Professor of Economics, University of Toronto in Canada
    Diego Restuccia is a Canada Research Chair in Macroeconomics and Productivity and a Professor of Economics at the University of Toronto in Canada. Professor Restuccia is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Professor Restuccia has taught at the University of Western Ontario and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He was also a Senior Economist in the Research Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. Professor Restuccia is currently an Editor of the Review of Economic Dynamics. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Minnesota. He was born in Montevideo, Uruguay; and grew up in Caracas, Venezuela. Professor Restuccia's areas of research include macroeconomics, economic growth and development, and labor economics. His recent research emphasizes the role of resource allocation across heterogeneous production units or sectors in understanding aggregate outcomes. Professor Restuccia's research work has been published in many journals in economics such as the American Economic Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Review of Economic Studies, the Journal of Monetary Economics, and the Review of Economic Dynamics.
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    Ana Revenga

    Senior Director, Poverty Global Practice, World Bank
    Ana Revenga is the Senior Director of the Poverty Global Practice at the World Bank Group. In her 24-year career at the World Bank, she has worked in both technical and management positions in the East Asia and the Pacific, Europe and Central Asia, Latin America, and Middle East and North Africa regions, as well as in OECD countries. Until July 1, 2014, she was Director of Human Development in the Europe and Central Asia Region and Acting Vice President for the Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network at the World Bank. Ms. Revenga was co-Director of the 2012 World Development Report on Gender Equality and Development, and between 2008 and 2011, she was Director of the Poverty Reduction and Equity Group at the World Bank, serving as the principal spokesperson for the Bank on these issues. She was one of the authors of the 1995 World Development Report (Workers in an Integrating World) and contributed to the 2006 World Development Report (Equity and Development). Prior to joining the World Bank, she worked in the Central Bank of Spain and taught labor and international economics at the Centro de Estudios Monetarios and Financieros. She has published extensively on education and employment, equity, food security, social protection, poverty, and trade issues, and has worked across a broad spectrum of low, middle and high income countries in Asia, Europe, Latin America, and North America. She has a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and a degree in Human Rights from the Law Faculty at the University of Geneva.
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    Richard Rogerson

    Charles and Marie Robertson Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Princeton University
    Richard Rogerson joined the faculty of Princeton University in spring of 2011, where he is the Charles and Marie Robertson Professor of Economics and Public Affairs. He is also the Director of the Louis A. Simpson Center for the Study of Macroeconomics. He obtained his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Minnesota in 1984 and has previously held faculty positions at the University of Rochester, New York University, Stanford University, the University of Minnesota, the University of Pennsylvania, and Arizona State University. Dr. Rogerson’s teaching and research interests are in the fields of Macroeconomics and Labor Economics. His published work includes papers on labor supply and taxes, business cycle fluctuations, the effects of labor market regulations, financing of public education, and development. He currently serves as Editor of the American Economic Journal: Macro and Associate Editor of the Review of Economic Dynamics, and has previously served as Co-Editor of the American Economic Review and Associate Editor of the Journal of Monetary Economics, the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control and the International Economic Review. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a fellow of the Econometric Society.
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    Mark R. Rosenzweig

    Frank Altschul Professor of International Economics and Director of the Economic Growth Center, Yale
    Mark R. Rosenzweig is the Frank Altschul Professor of International Economics and Director of the Economic Growth Center at Yale. Before that he served as the Director of the Center for International Devlopment at Harvard University. He is a development economist who pioneered in the use of microeconometric methods for studying the causes and consequences of economic development and the role of human capital. Rosenzweig is Co-Editor of the Handbook of Family and Population Economics and of the newest Handbook of Development Economics. Rosenzweig also recently served as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Development Economics. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society, a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Yangtze River Scholar. Rosenzweig earned B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University.
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    Jo Van Biesebroeck

    Professor of Economics, University of Leuven in Belgium
    Jo Van Biesebroeck is a Professor of Economics at the University of Leuven in Belgium and a Research Fellow at the CEPR. He obtained his PhD at Stanford University in 2001 and worked until 2008 at the University of Toronto. His fields of specialization are international trade and industrial organization. In recent work he studied productivity growth in the Chinese economy, innovation and outsourcing in the automotive industry, and constraints on industry and firm dynamics.
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    European Central Bank

    The European Central Bank (ECB) is the central bank of the 19 European Union countries which have adopted the euro. Their main task is to maintain price stability in the euro area and so preserve the purchasing power of the single currency.
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    The Competitiveness Research Network

    The Competitiveness Research Network (CompNet) of the European System of Central Banks (ESCB) functions as a forum in which to discuss different approaches to, and measures of, competitiveness.



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