Mobile Technology https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/3559/all en Blog post of the month: Six lessons I learnt while trying to reach 10 million women in India with life-saving health information https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/blog-post-month-six-lessons-i-learnt-while-trying-reach-10-million-women-india-life-saving-health <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <h4> Each month People, Spaces, Deliberation shares the blog post that generated the most interest and discussion. In March 2016, the featured blog post is "<a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/six-lessons-i-learnt-while-trying-reach-10-million-women-india-life-saving-health-information" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Six lessons I learnt while trying to reach 10 million women in India with life-saving health information</a>" by Priyanka Dutt.</h4> <p> <img alt="Kilkari mobile messaging" height="186" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/kilari1.jpg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:left" title=" BBC Media Action" width="280" />Last month, the Government of India launched a nationwide mobile health (mHealth) program designed by BBC Media Action, the BBC’s international development charity. The aim - to train 1 million community health workers and help nearly 10 million new and expecting mothers in India make healthier choices and lead longer, healthier lives.<br />  <br /><em>Mobile Academy</em> is an anytime, anywhere audio training course, delivered via mobile phone, designed to refresh the knowledge and strengthen the communication skills of community health workers. The objective is to enable the nation’s nearly one million health workers to more effectively persuade families to lead healthier lives.<br />  <br /><em>Kilkari</em>  (a baby’s gurgle) service delivers free, weekly, time-appropriate audio messages about pregnancy, childbirth, and childcare directly to the mobile phones of mothers and other family members from the second trimester of pregnancy until the child is one year old.<br /><br /> These services were originally <a href="https://www.rethink1000days.org/2013/08/lifeline-in-bihar/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">designed for use in Bihar </a>in North India, where BBC Media Action, in partnership with the state government works to improve demand for health services, improve social norms and impact health outcomes for mothers and children. <a href="https://www.rethink1000days.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Read more</a>.<br /><br /><em>Mobile Academy</em> and <em>Kilkari</em> leverage the massive penetration of mobile phones to reach the most marginalized, hardest-to-reach communities in India. These are communities where getting pregnant and having babies can be 24 times more life-threatening than giving birth in the United Kingdom!<br />  <br /> The statistics are pretty stark. Globally, every five minutes, three women die from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth, while 60 others will be left with debilitating injuries. Of these deaths, India accounts for the greatest number of women dying – over 150 every day. But we know how many of these health risks that pregnant women and their newborns face are preventable.<br /></div></div></div> Fri, 01 Apr 2016 15:52:00 +0000 BBC Media Action 7356 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Six lessons I learnt while trying to reach 10 million women in India with life-saving health information https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/six-lessons-i-learnt-while-trying-reach-10-million-women-india-life-saving-health-information <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> Priyanka Dutt shares what she has learned while implementing a mobile health program for women in India.</h4> <p> <img alt="Kilkari mobile messaging" height="186" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/kilari1.jpg" style="float:left" title=" BBC Media Action" width="280" />Last month, the Government of India launched a nationwide mobile health (mHealth) program designed by BBC Media Action, the BBC’s international development charity. The aim - to train 1 million community health workers and help nearly 10 million new and expecting mothers in India make healthier choices and lead longer, healthier lives.<br />  <br /><em>Mobile Academy</em> is an anytime, anywhere audio training course, delivered via mobile phone, designed to refresh the knowledge and strengthen the communication skills of community health workers. The objective is to enable the nation’s nearly one million health workers to more effectively persuade families to lead healthier lives.<br />  <br /><em>Kilkari</em>  (a baby’s gurgle) service delivers free, weekly, time-appropriate audio messages about pregnancy, childbirth, and childcare directly to the mobile phones of mothers and other family members from the second trimester of pregnancy until the child is one year old.<br /><br /> These services were originally <a href="https://www.rethink1000days.org/2013/08/lifeline-in-bihar/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">designed for use in Bihar </a>in North India, where BBC Media Action, in partnership with the state government works to improve demand for health services, improve social norms and impact health outcomes for mothers and children. <a href="https://www.rethink1000days.org" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Read more</a>.<br /><br /><em>Mobile Academy</em> and <em>Kilkari</em> leverage the massive penetration of mobile phones to reach the most marginalized, hardest-to-reach communities in India. These are communities where getting pregnant and having babies can be 24 times more life-threatening than giving birth in the United Kingdom!<br />  <br /> The statistics are pretty stark. Globally, every five minutes, three women die from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth, while 60 others will be left with debilitating injuries. Of these deaths, India accounts for the greatest number of women dying – over 150 every day. But we know how many of these health risks that pregnant women and their newborns face are preventable.<br /><br /></div></div></div> Tue, 08 Mar 2016 17:39:00 +0000 BBC Media Action 7332 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Conflict of interest: Global internet privacy trends https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/conflict-interest-global-internet-privacy-trends <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">The internet, and <a href="https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/02/22/key-takeaways-global-tech/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">mobile internet </a>in particular, continue to expand across the developed and developing world – on a scale which is too large and diffuse to control. While this brings greater connectivity to large masses of people, it also has serious implications for the security and privacy of personal data.<br />  <br /> Companies increasingly use cloud based services and operate across national boundaries, with servers in multiple national jurisdictions. This is because users want to be able to access their data from any device, which effectively requires data and applications to be housed on a cloud-based server. The rise of mobile devices has further exacerbated consumer demand for <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-cloud-and-connectivity-revolution" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">cloud connectivity</a>.  Moreover, privacy laws vary significantly across different national jurisdictions; global companies often receive information in one country and then process it in a different country with a different regulatory framework. Thus, in a globalized world it becomes ever more challenging to ensure standards of privacy are upheld.<br />  <br /> Concurrently, national governments seek to obtain and exploit the personal information stored on servers and personal devices for purposes of national security. At times, <a href="https://www.theverge.com/2016/2/25/11114096/microsoft-supports-apple-fbi-iphone-encryption-case" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">they compel companies to release personal data</a>. It’s also interesting—and perhaps frightening— that <a href="https://thenewstack.io/six-of-the-best-open-source-data-mining-tools/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">open source intelligence statistical techniques</a> are able to collect, correlate and triangulate data to identify previously anonymous information.<br /><br /> Claire Connelly, a journalist specialising in privacy and technology, from Sydney, Australia outlines some of the key global trends she sees unfolding around the world.<br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-239 asset-video"> <strong > Conflict of interest: Global Internet Privacy Trends </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="640" height="360" data="//www.youtube.com/v/N6PLWWDC41A"> <param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/N6PLWWDC41A" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> </object> </div></div></div></div> </div><br /></div></div></div> Thu, 25 Feb 2016 19:58:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7320 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: The mobile industry's multiplier effect on the global economy https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-mobile-industrys-multiplier-effect-global-economy <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</h4> The <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-mobile-technology-leads-new-digital-economy" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">global mobile technology industry continues to grow</a> and is now a major source of employment generation.  When mobile operators purchase inputs and services from their providers in the supply chain, they generate sales and value added in other sectors and industries, creating a <a href="https://www.economicsonline.co.uk/Managing_the_economy/The_multiplier_effect.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">multiplier effect </a>on the rest of the economy.  Accordingly, employment in the mobile technology industry can be directly tied to the product, like engineers, managers, and sales staff that work for mobile operators and manufactures, but it can also be indirectly tied to the product, like application development, content provision, and call centers that serve not only mobile operators and manufacturers but also third-party content and device producers. In some developing countries, outsourcing of mobile content development creates significant numbers of indirect employment opportunities.<br /><br /> In 2014, it was estimated that the mobile technology industry directly employed approximately 12.8 million people globally and 11.8 million people indirectly, bringing the total impact to just under 25 million jobs.<br />   <div> <img alt="Global mobile ecosystem employment impact" height="441" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/employmentmobiletech1.png" title="" width="716" /></div> </div></div></div> Wed, 13 May 2015 15:24:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7047 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-202 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="139" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2015/feb/26/tomorrows-world-development-megatrends-challenging-ngos" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>Tomorrow’s world: seven development megatrends challenging NGOs</strong></a><br /> The Guardian<br /> As we move into 2015, many UK-based NGOs are wondering how to meet the challenges of a crucial year. What is the unique and distinct value that each organisation, and the UK sector as a whole, brings to international development, and how might this change in future? To help the sector get on the front foot we have identified seven “megatrends” and posed a few questions to highlight some of the key choices NGOs might need to make. At the end of next week we’ll be concluding a consultation with DfID on the future of the sector – all your thoughts are welcome.<br /><br /><a href="https://gigaom.com/2015/03/04/affordability-report-shows-why-emerging-markets-need-smart-internet-policies/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>Why emerging markets need smart internet policies</strong></a><br /> Gigaom<br /> The Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI) has released its latest study into, well, the affordability of internet access. The study shows how big the challenge is on that front in emerging markets – for over two billion people there, fixed-line broadband costs on average 40 percent of their monthly income, and mobile broadband costs on average 10 percent of their monthly income. The United Nations’ “affordability target” for internet access is five percent of monthly income, so there’s clearly a ways to go in many developing countries. Almost 60 percent of global households are still unconnected and, unsurprisingly, those who can’t afford to get online tend to be poor, in rural communities and/or women.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 12 Mar 2015 14:06:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6990 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-197 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="139" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jan/28/-sp-africa-2030-drones-telemedicine-robots" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Africa in 2030: drones, telemedicine and robots?</a></strong><br /> The Guardian<br /> In 2000 the CIA’s national intelligence council made a series of pessimistic predictions about Africa. They suggested that sub-saharan Africa would become “less important to the international economy” by 2015; that African democracy had gone “as far as it could go”; and that technological advances would “not have a substantial positive impact on the African economies.”  Clearly, predictions don’t always come true. Between 2000 and 2012, the number of mobile connections in Africa grew by 44%. In 2011, mobile operators and their associated businesses in Africa has a “direct economic impact” of $32bn, and payed $12bn in taxes. It made up 4.4% of sub-Saharan Africa’s GDP, according to a 2012 report.  But the advances in communications are not the only element defining Africa’s future:<br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/bjornlomborg/2015/01/22/good-governance-well-meaning-slogan-or-desirable-development-goal/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Good Governance: Well-Meaning Slogan Or Desirable Development Goal?</a></strong><br /> Forbes<br /> Corruption last year cost the world more than one trillion dollars. That is a trillion dollars we can’t use to get better health care, education, food and environment. And corruption is only part of the problem of poor governance – many countries are run ineffectively, lacking accountability, transparency and rule of law.  Running countries better would have obvious benefits. It would not only reduce corruption but governments would provide more services the public wants and at better quality. It is also likely that economic growth would increase. In a recent UN survey of seven million people around the world, an honest and responsive government was fourth in the list of people’s priorities, with only education and healthcare and better jobs being rated higher.  But how should we get better governance?</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 05 Feb 2015 13:56:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6954 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Mobile Technology Leads New Digital Economy https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-mobile-technology-leads-new-digital-economy <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.<br /><br /> Throughout 2014, People, Spaces, Deliberation has focused attention on the rising importance of <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-unique-mobile-subscribers" rel="nofollow">mobile phones</a>, <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-cloud-and-connectivity-revolution" rel="nofollow">cloud computing</a>, <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-e-commerce-will-rise-emerging-markets" rel="nofollow">data and business intelligence</a>, and <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-mobile-social-scale" rel="nofollow">social media</a>. These megatrends have dominated the technology and communications landscapes and promise to do so in the future as well.<br /><br /> Executives— in both the public and private spheres— are taking note of these megatrends. When asked, “Which do you believe will have the greatest positive impact on your business over the next five years?” survey respondents of a global report, <a href="https://www.oxfordeconomics.com/publication/open/239265" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Digital Megatrends 2015</a>, from Oxford Economics gave the following answers. <br /><br /><img alt="" height="213" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/oxford-mobile-greatest-impact-on-biz.jpg" title="" width="540" /><br /><br /></div></div></div> Wed, 17 Dec 2014 16:21:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6909 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Global Mobile Data 2014 - Traffic Growth and Forecast https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-global-mobile-data-2014-traffic-growth-and-forecast <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.<br /><br /> Every day, people create <a href="https://www-01.ibm.com/software/data/bigdata/what-is-big-data.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">2.5 quintillion bytes of data</a>- this astonishing rate means that 90% of the data in the world today was created in just the last two years! <br /><br /> Sources of data include mobile phones, tablets, the Internet of Things, and social media. Mobile technologies, in particular, have contributed to the growth of mobile data as new apps are created and used every day to to send text, make mobile payments, watch multimedia, or shop to name a few.  These activities all leave a digital footprint-- <a href="https://www.sas.com/en_us/insights/big-data/what-is-big-data.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">big data</a> that can be analyzed. <br /><br /> The graphic below illustrates recent global mobile data traffic growth by region and provides a forecast for the coming years:<br /><br /><img alt="" height="382" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/graph_global_mobil_data.jpg" width="540" /></p> </div></div></div> Wed, 30 Jul 2014 16:05:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6773 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: The impact of the Connected Life over the next five years https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-impact-connected-life-over-next-five-years <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.<br /><br /> Mobile technology is redefining our lives and making it increasingly connected. From health and education to transportation and the environment, the proliferation of mobile communication and a 'connected life' is now well established. The examples provided in this infographic only scratch the surface of the impact that mobile devices will have on society over the next five years for both developed and developing markets.<br /><br /><img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/ConnectedLife.PNG" style="float:left; height:323px; width:540px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />  </p> </div></div></div> Wed, 26 Mar 2014 15:34:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6649 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-153 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><br /><img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); float:right; height:139px; max-width:none; padding:2px; vertical-align:bottom; width:140px" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><a href="https://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-02-20/behind-a-pattern-of-global-unrest-a-middle-class-in-revolt" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>Behind a Pattern of Global Unrest, a Middle Class in Revolt</strong></a><br /> Bloomberg BusinessWeek<br /> For months now, protestors have gathered in the capitals of many developing nations—Turkey, Ukraine, Thailand, Venezuela, Malaysia, and Cambodia, among others—in demonstrations united by some key features. In nearly all these places, protestors are pushing to oust presidents or prime ministers they claim are venal, authoritarian, and unresponsive to popular opinion. Nearly all these governments, no matter how corrupt, brutal, and autocratic, actually won election in relatively free polls. And in nearly all these countries the vast majority of demonstrators hail from cosmopolitan areas: Kiev, Bangkok, Caracas, Istanbul, and other cities. The streets seem to be filled with the very people one might expect to support democracy rather than put more nails in its coffin.<br /><br /><a href="https://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2014/02/where-did-press-freedom-suffer-most-in-2013-online/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>Where Did Press Freedom Suffer Most in 2013? Online.</strong></a><br /> PBS Media Shift<br /> This month the Committee to Protect Journalists released its annual analysis of Attacks on the Press, including a “<a href="https://www.cpj.org/2014/02/attacks-on-the-press-cpj-risk-list.php" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Risk List</a>” of the places where press freedom suffered most in 2013. As you might expect, conflict areas filled much of the list — Syria, Egypt, Turkey — but the place on the top of the list was not a country. It was cyberspace. In the past, the list has focused on highlighting nations where freedom of the press are under attack, but this year CPJ wrote, “We chose to add the supranational platform of cyberspace to the list because of the profound erosion of freedom on the Internet a critical sphere for journalists worldwide.” Including cyberspace is a recognition that, at least in terms of press freedom and freedom of expression, the web is not virtual reality, it is reality. </div></div></div> Thu, 06 Mar 2014 16:34:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6626 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-151 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); float:right; height:139px; max-width:none; padding:2px; vertical-align:bottom; width:140px" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br />   <p> <a href="https://www.pewglobal.org/2014/02/13/emerging-nations-embrace-internet-mobile-technology/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>Emerging Nations Embrace Internet, Mobile Technology</strong></a><strong> </strong><br /> Pew Research Global Attitudes Project<br /> In a remarkably short period of time, internet and mobile technology have become a part of everyday life for some in the emerging and developing world. Cell phones, in particular, are almost omnipresent in many nations. The internet has also made tremendous inroads, although most people in the 24 nations surveyed are still offline. Meanwhile, smartphones are still relatively rare, although significant minorities own these devices in countries such as Lebanon, Chile, Jordan and China. People around the world are using their cell phones for a variety of purposes, especially for texting and taking pictures, while smaller numbers also use their phones to get political, consumer and health information. Mobile technology is also changing economic life in parts of Africa, where many are using cell phones to make or receive payments. <a href="https://www.pewglobal.org/2014/02/13/emerging-nations-embrace-internet-mobile-technology/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">READ MORE</a><br />  <br /><a href="https://www.forbes.cm/sites/elisugarman/2014/02/12/how-emerging-markets-internet-policies-are-undermining-their-economic-recovery/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>How Emerging Markets' Internet Policies Are Undermining Their Economic Recovery</strong></a><br /> Forbes<br /> NSA surveillance activities are projected to cost the American <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/elisugarman/2014/01/30/the-commerce-department-to-the-rescue-on-surveillance-reform/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">economy</a> billions of dollars annually. Washington is not alone, however, in pursuing costly policies in the technology and Internet realm. Several emerging economies – including Brazil, Turkey, and Indonesia – are likewise undermining their already <a href="https://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21595485-developing-economies-struggle-cope-new-world-locus-extremity" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">fragile markets</a> by embracing Internet censorship, data localization requirements, and other misguided policies – ironically often in response to intrusive U.S. surveillance practices. These countries should reverse course and support the free and open Internet before permanent economic damage is done. <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/elisugarman/2014/02/12/how-emerging-markets-internet-policies-are-undermining-their-economic-recovery/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">READ MORE</a></p> </div></div></div> Thu, 20 Feb 2014 14:04:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6609 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Mobile Social Scale https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-mobile-social-scale <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.<br /><br /> These two slides describe the active monthly users and registered users of popular social messaging sites.  Social messaging is loosely<a href="https://www.telecoms.com/files/2009/05/buongiorno_final-fmt_nl-3110-f.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"> understood to be </a>a "set of tools and platforms which permit people to exchange messages with groups<br /> (communities) or individuals, sometimes in combination with SMS but most frequently using a web platform and browser."<br /><br /><br /><img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/MobileSocialScale.jpg" style="height:375px; width:500px" /></p> </div></div></div> Wed, 29 Jan 2014 17:09:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6590 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere #3 from 2013: Who is Listening? Who is Responding? Can Technology Innovations Empower Citizens to Affect Positive Changes in their Communities? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/3-2013-who-listening-who-responding-can-technology-innovations-empower-citizens-affect-positive <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Johanna/9235392888_e31f2ce869.jpg" style="float:left; height:186px; width:280px" /><em><strong>Our Top Ten blog posts by readership in 2013</strong><br /> This post was originally published on August 15, 2013</em><br /><br /> It was a sunny, hot Saturday afternoon and I mingled with farmers, community leaders, coffee producers and handicrafts entrepreneurs who had traveled from all parts of Bolivia to gather at the main square of Cliza, a rural town outside of Cochabamba. The place was packed and a sense of excitement and high expectations was unfolding. It was to be anything but an ordinary market day.<br />    <br /> Thousands of people had been selected from more than 700 rural communities to showcase their products and they were waiting for a special moment. President Evo Morales, Nemesia Achocallo, Minister for Rural Development, Viviana Caro, Minister for Development Planning, and World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, on his first official visit to Bolivia, would soon be meeting them.  <br /><br /> While waiting among them, I felt their excitement, listened to their life stories and was humbled by the high expectations they had in their government, their leaders and the international community to support them in reaching their aspirations for a better future for their families and communities. From many I heard the need to improve the well-being of their families and communities and their goal of “Vivir Bien!”</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 07 Jan 2014 15:17:00 +0000 Soren Gigler 6435 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere #5 from 2013: Using Twitter to Run Cities Better: Governance @SF311 https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/governance-sf311 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/sftwitter.jpg" style="float:left; height:399px; width:281px" /><em><strong>Our Top Ten Blog Posts by readership in 2013</strong><br /> This post was originally published on January 24, 2013</em><br /> <br /> It will soon be nearly four years since then San Francisco mayor, Gavin Newsom visited Twitter headquarters.&nbsp; He told Biz Stone (one of the Twitter founders) about how someone from the city had sent him a Twitter message about a pothole.&nbsp; <a href="https://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2348072,00.asp" target="_blank">A discussion</a> about "how we can get Twitter to be involved in advancing, streamlining, and supporting the governance of cities," led to the creation of @SF311 on Twitter that would allow live reporting by citizens of service needs, feedback, and other communication.&nbsp; Perhaps the most innovative aspect at that time was that citizens would be able to communicate directly and transparently with the Government.&nbsp; San Francisco was the first US city to roll out a major service such as this on Twitter.</p> <p> Twitter offers several advantages over phonecalls or written requests made by citizens, some of which I have mentioned before:</div></div></div> Fri, 03 Jan 2014 18:07:00 +0000 Tanya Gupta 6219 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-131 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo.jpeg" style="float:right; height:119px; width:120px" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><strong><a href="https://www.humanosphere.org/2013/08/international-development-according-to-hollywood/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">International development according to Hollywood</a></strong><br /><em>Humanosphere</em><br />  <br /> “International development is just about at the bottom of the list of things that the average American thinks about each day.<br />  <br /> Foreign bureaus are closing for major US news sources. One of the big television networks turned down more money for global health reporting after a series, entirely funded by grants, led to a dip in viewers. In other words ratings were so bad that the network turned down millions of dollars. It is that tough.<br />  <br /> Aside from advocacy efforts like Kony 2012 and Oxfam advertisements, how are people learning about the world around them if they are not reading the news? The answer could be Hollywood.”  <a href="https://www.humanosphere.org/2013/08/international-development-according-to-hollywood/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">READ MORE</a></p> </div></div></div> Thu, 29 Aug 2013 13:28:26 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6453 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere