Africa https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/248/all en Ebola: How a people’s science helped end an epidemic https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/ebola-how-people-s-science-helped-end-epidemic <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><img alt="" height="140" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/anita-makri-150x150.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="140" />Guest book review from <a href="https://anitamakri.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Anita Makri</a>, an editor and writer going freelance after 5+ years with <a href="https://www.scidev.net/global/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">SciDev.Net</a>. (@anita_makri)</em></p> <p> I’m sure that to readers of this blog the Ebola epidemic that devastated West Africa a couple of years ago needs no introduction (just in case, here’s a <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/sep/25/-sp-ebola-crisis-briefing" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">nice summary</a> by the Guardian’s health editor). So I’ll cut to the chase, and to a narrative that at the time was bubbling underneath more familiar debates about responding to health crises – you know, things like imperfect governance, fragile health systems, drug shortages.</p> <p> All of them important, but this narrative was new. It was about fear, communication and cooperation – the human and social side of the crisis (explored in a <a href="https://www.scidev.net/global/ebola/spotlight/ebola-health-emergency-response.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">SciDev.Net collection</a> I commissioned at the time). There was also an unsettling undercurrent to it – one that conveyed ‘otherness’ and ignorance on the part of West Africans, fuelled by reports of <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/sep/18/ebola-health-workers-missing-guinea" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">violence against health workers</a> and of communities resisting expert advice against risky funeral rites.</p> <p> <a href="https://www.zedbooks.net/shop/book/ebola/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="282" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/ebola-bookcover-654x1024.jpg" style="float:right" title="" width="180" /></a>But if you listened closely, you could just about make out <a href="https://www.scidev.net/global/ebola/scidev-net-at-large/lessons-social-response-ebola.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">the voices of anthropologists</a> trying to dispel notions that these reactions were about exotic or traditional cultures. Paul Richards was one of those voices, and luckily he’s put together a rare account of evidence, theory and experience in a book that should trigger real reflection on how we can do better in handling similar crises (hint: more listening).</p> <p> <a href="https://www.zedbooks.net/shop/book/ebola/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Ebola: How a People’s Science Helped End an Epidemic</a> tells the story of the epidemic through the eyes of someone with intimate knowledge of the region and the rules that influence human interactions – very much an anthropologist’s perspective, not an epidemiologist’s. The book turns the mainstream discourse on its head, putting what Richards calls “people’s science” on an equal footing with the more orthodox science behind the international response. It captures how people and experts adapted to each other, falling into a process of knowledge co-production.</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 25 Oct 2016 16:03:00 +0000 Duncan Green 7545 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Meaty issues on the radio https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/meaty-issues-radio <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div> <h4> <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcmediaaction/authors/b6756e2f-8944-3325-b9c5-912466e4e27d" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Ehizogie Ohiani</a>, a Producer/Trainer for BBC Media Action in Nigeria, discusses how radio is raising awareness about the lack of hygiene amongst the butchers of Benue State, Nigeria.</h4> <p> <img alt="" height="158" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/harvestfmproducer.jpg" style="float:left" title=" BBC Media Action" width="280" />A meal without meat is as good as no meal for most people in Benue State, North Central Nigeria. Considering its importance, one would expect that hygiene surrounding the preparation and sale of meat would be held in the same high esteem. This is not the case.</p> <p> A murky mix of flies, blood, water, muddy walkways, sweaty bodies and smoke combine to make the abattoirs in the marketplaces of Benue State a perfect breeding ground for disease. Lack of adequate sanitation knowledge, lack of enforcement by market associations and insufficient supervision of animal slaughter by qualified veterinary officers conspire to create major health challenges for communities.</p> </div> <div> <p> I was at Harvest FM, a local radio station in Benue State, to train producers. We were brainstorming ways we could use their popular early morning show “Good Morning Benue” to help serve the public interest. For the producers, an obvious choice was to discuss hygiene in abattoirs.</p> <p> The programme explored a number of problems in the state’s local abattoirs: an absence of toilet and handwashing facilities and the practice of washing meat with untreated water sourced direct from the River Benue.</div></div></div> Wed, 01 Jun 2016 18:18:00 +0000 BBC Media Action 7415 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Evidence based policy or policy based evidence? Supply and demand for data in a donor dominant world https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/evidence-based-policy-or-policy-based-evidence-supply-and-demand-data-donor-dominant-world <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> This post, by <a href="https://www.mortenjerven.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Morten Jerven</a>, is a contribution to an online symposium on the changing nature of knowledge production in fragile states. Be sure to read other entries by <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/tomayto-tomahto-research-supply-chain-and-ethics-knowledge-production" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Deval Desai and Rebecca Tapscott</a>, <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/turning-gaze-ourselves-acknowledging-political-economy-development-research" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Lisa Denney and Pilar Domingo</a>, and <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/beyond-quest-policy-implications-alternative-options-applied-development-researchers" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Michael Woolcock</a>.</h4> <p> <img alt="Patients seeking treatment at Redemption Hospital in Monrovia, " height="187" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/liberia_mothers.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="280" />In 2010 I was doing research for <a href="https://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140100939320&amp;CFID=18764106&amp;CFTOKEN=4f4e5eca80f4acd4-AEAD51BC-C29B-B0E5-3E59F22168A1A98D&amp;jsessionid=843059c4d3c9127b597cc441356c12687d42" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><em>Poor Numbers:</em> <em>How we are misled by African development statistics and what to do about it</em></a><em>. </em> I was In Lusaka, Zambia on a Wednesday afternoon, and was having a free and frank conversation with a specialist working for the UK’s Department for International Development (DfID) office there as part of the ethnographic component of my book. One of the themes we kept returning to was the problem that donors demanded evidence that was not necessarily relevant for Zambian policy makers. We were also discussing how results-oriented MDG reporting had created real outside pressure to distort statistics, with donors having the final say on what gets measured, when and how. Indeed, whenever I asked anyone in Zambia—and elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa—“what do we know about economic growth?,” a recurring issue was how resources were diverted from domestic economic statistics to MDG-relevant statistics.</p> <p> Two days later I was sitting in the Central Statistical Office in Lusaka, talking to the then only remaining member of the economic statistics division. In 2007, this division was manned by three statisticians, but when I returned in 2010, there was only one person there. The other two had been pulled from economic statistics to social and demographic statistics where there was more donor money for per diem payments. The phone rang. DfID Lusaka was on the other end. They had a problem. They had financed a report on social statistics, but the office statistician tasked with completing the report had recently travelled to Japan to participate in a generously funded training course, leaving the report incomplete. Could someone help out? And so it was that the last remaining economic statistician for the Zambian government temporarily left the office to come to the rescue.</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 29 Dec 2015 20:38:00 +0000 Humanity Journal 7259 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-218 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="World of News" height="139" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><strong><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2015/jun/22/corruption-global-poverty-development-politics" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Does talking about corruption make it seem worse?</a></strong><br /> The Guardian<br /> What do most people immediately think of when you ask them why poor countries are poor? We’re pretty confident that it will be corruption. Whether you ask thousands of people in a nationally representative survey, or small focus groups, corruption tops people’s explanations for the persistence of poverty. Indeed, 10 years of research into public perceptions of poverty suggests that corruption “is the only topic related to global poverty which the mass public seem happy to talk about”.  Which is odd, because it’s the absolute last thing that people actually working in development want to talk about.<br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/africas-moment-to-lead-on-climate/2015/06/19/8d54091e-15eb-11e5-9ddc-e3353542100c_story.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Africa’s moment to lead on climate</a></strong><br /> Washington Post<br /> Climate change is the greatest threat facing humanity today. To avoid catastrophe, we must dramatically reduce the carbon intensity of our modern energy systems, which have set us on a collision course with our planetary boundaries. This is the challenge leading up to three key international events this year: a July summit on financing for new global development goals, another in September to settle on those goals and — crucially — a global meeting in December to frame an agreement, and set meaningful targets, on climate change. But focusing on ambitious global climate goals can mask the existence of real impacts on the ground. Nowhere is this truer than in sub-Saharan Africa.   No region has done less to cause climate change, yet sub-Saharan Africa is experiencing some of the earliest, most severe and most damaging effects. As a result, Africa’s leaders have every reason to support international efforts to address climate change. But these leaders also have to deal urgently with the disturbing reality behind Africa’s tiny carbon footprint: a crushing lack of modern energy.<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Thu, 02 Jul 2015 13:45:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7097 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-202 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="139" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2015/feb/26/tomorrows-world-development-megatrends-challenging-ngos" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>Tomorrow’s world: seven development megatrends challenging NGOs</strong></a><br /> The Guardian<br /> As we move into 2015, many UK-based NGOs are wondering how to meet the challenges of a crucial year. What is the unique and distinct value that each organisation, and the UK sector as a whole, brings to international development, and how might this change in future? To help the sector get on the front foot we have identified seven “megatrends” and posed a few questions to highlight some of the key choices NGOs might need to make. At the end of next week we’ll be concluding a consultation with DfID on the future of the sector – all your thoughts are welcome.<br /><br /><a href="https://gigaom.com/2015/03/04/affordability-report-shows-why-emerging-markets-need-smart-internet-policies/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>Why emerging markets need smart internet policies</strong></a><br /> Gigaom<br /> The Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI) has released its latest study into, well, the affordability of internet access. The study shows how big the challenge is on that front in emerging markets – for over two billion people there, fixed-line broadband costs on average 40 percent of their monthly income, and mobile broadband costs on average 10 percent of their monthly income. The United Nations’ “affordability target” for internet access is five percent of monthly income, so there’s clearly a ways to go in many developing countries. Almost 60 percent of global households are still unconnected and, unsurprisingly, those who can’t afford to get online tend to be poor, in rural communities and/or women.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 12 Mar 2015 14:06:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6990 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-201 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>  <img alt="" height="139" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><strong><a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2015/02/23/dial-ict-for-conflict-four-lessons-on-conflict-and-contention-in-the-info-age/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Dial ICT for conflict? Four lessons on conflict and contention in the info age</a></strong><br /> The Washington Post<br /> The past decade has witnessed an explosion of interest among political scientists in the outbreak and dynamics of civil wars. Much of this research has been facilitated by the rise of electronic media, including newspapers but extending to social media (Twitter, Facebook) that permit the collection of fine-grained data on patterns of civil war violence. At the same time, a parallel research program has emerged that centers on the effects of new information and communication technologies (ICTs). Yet these two research efforts rarely intersect.<br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://hbr.org/2015/02/improving-innovation-in-africa" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Improving Innovation in Africa</a></strong><br /> Harvard Business Review<br /> Opportunity is on the rise in Africa. New research, funded by the Tony Elumelu Foundation and conducted by my team at the African Institution of Technology, shows that within Africa, innovation is accelerating and the continent is finding better ways of solving local problems, even as it attracts top technology global brands. Young Africans are unleashing entrepreneurial energies as governments continue to enact reforms that improve business environments. An increasing number of start-ups are providing solutions to different business problems in the region. These are deepening the continent’s competitive capabilities to diversify the economies beyond just minerals and hydrocarbon. Despite this progress, Africa is still deeply underperforming in core areas that will redesign its economy and make it more sustainable.<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Fri, 06 Mar 2015 14:58:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6985 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Building evidence-informed policy networks in Africa https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/building-evidence-informed-policy-networks-africa <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="187" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/15417324677_67a12ee907_o.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="280" />Evidence-informed policymaking is gaining importance in several African countries. Networks of researchers and policymakers in Malawi, Uganda, Cameroon, South Africa, Kenya, Ghana, Benin and Zimbabwe are working assiduously to ensure credible evidence reaches government officials in time and are also building the capacity of policymakers to use the evidence effectively. The <a href="https://www.africaevidencenetwork.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Africa Evidence Network</a> (AEN) is one such body working with governments in South Africa and Malawi. It held its first colloquium in November 2014 in Johannesburg.  <br /><br /><br /><br /><strong>Africa Evidence Network, the beginning</strong><br /><br /> A network of over 300 policymakers, researchers and practitioners, AEN is now emerging as a regional body in its own right. The network began in December 2012 with a meeting of 20 African representatives at 3ie’s <a href="https://www.3ieimpact.org/en/events/3ie-conferences-and-workshops/dhaka-colloquium-systematic-reviews-international-development/?preview" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Dhaka Colloquium of Systematic Reviews in International Development</a>.<br /></div></div></div> Wed, 04 Mar 2015 17:26:00 +0000 Paromita Mukhopadhyay 6983 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-197 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="139" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jan/28/-sp-africa-2030-drones-telemedicine-robots" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Africa in 2030: drones, telemedicine and robots?</a></strong><br /> The Guardian<br /> In 2000 the CIA’s national intelligence council made a series of pessimistic predictions about Africa. They suggested that sub-saharan Africa would become “less important to the international economy” by 2015; that African democracy had gone “as far as it could go”; and that technological advances would “not have a substantial positive impact on the African economies.”  Clearly, predictions don’t always come true. Between 2000 and 2012, the number of mobile connections in Africa grew by 44%. In 2011, mobile operators and their associated businesses in Africa has a “direct economic impact” of $32bn, and payed $12bn in taxes. It made up 4.4% of sub-Saharan Africa’s GDP, according to a 2012 report.  But the advances in communications are not the only element defining Africa’s future:<br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/bjornlomborg/2015/01/22/good-governance-well-meaning-slogan-or-desirable-development-goal/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Good Governance: Well-Meaning Slogan Or Desirable Development Goal?</a></strong><br /> Forbes<br /> Corruption last year cost the world more than one trillion dollars. That is a trillion dollars we can’t use to get better health care, education, food and environment. And corruption is only part of the problem of poor governance – many countries are run ineffectively, lacking accountability, transparency and rule of law.  Running countries better would have obvious benefits. It would not only reduce corruption but governments would provide more services the public wants and at better quality. It is also likely that economic growth would increase. In a recent UN survey of seven million people around the world, an honest and responsive government was fourth in the list of people’s priorities, with only education and healthcare and better jobs being rated higher.  But how should we get better governance?</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 05 Feb 2015 13:56:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6954 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere #2 from 2014: Entertainment Media Can Help Change Behaviors and Stop the Ebola Outbreak https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/2-2014-entertainment-media-can-help-change-behaviors-and-stop-ebola-outbreak-0 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><strong>Our Top Ten blog posts by readership in 2014. </strong><br /> This post was originally posted on August 06, 2014</em><br /><br /><img alt="" height="186" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Johanna/14835527814_b34bc60650.jpg" style="float:right" title="" width="280" />In the wake of the current Ebola crisis, the 2011 movie <em>Contagion</em> (<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NeLrWx6AQec" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">See the trailer here</a>) directed by Steven Soderbergh has repeatedly been cited as one of the best examples of a movie taking on the subject of pandemic disease and managing to educate while providing gripping entertainment. This is no coincidence.<em>Contagion</em> was produced with both A-list stars (Gwyneth Paltrow, Matt Damon, Laurence Fishburne, Kate Winslet, and others) and support from leading public health experts such as Dr. Ian Lipkin who is the inspiration for one of the scientists portrayed in the film, and award-winning writer Laurie Garrett, author of several books including <em>The Coming Plague</em>. <a href="https://www.participantmedia.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Participant Media</a>, founded by Jeff Skoll to inspire social change through entertainment, was a producer, with the <a href="https://www.skollglobalthreats.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Skoll Global Threats Fund</a>, <a href="https://www.who.int/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Health Organization</a> (WHO), and <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention </a>(CDC) providing input as well.<br /><br /> The tagline from the film is “No One is Immune…to Fear.” While one of the early scenes is of a woman dying of a flu-like illness (played by Paltrow) the movie elicits fear not from gruesome symptoms but instead from plot lines and messages that focus on how human responses to these types of public health crises make matters worse. It also showcases the valuable work done by epidemiologists and other public health workers who are the heroes of this film. <em>Contagion</em> communicates these and other lessons effectively using the power of story, a subject recently discussed on <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/things-we-do-how-not-what-movies-inspire-us" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">this blog</a>.<br /></div></div></div> Thu, 08 Jan 2015 16:59:00 +0000 Margaret Miller 6925 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-191 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div> <div>  </div> <div> <img alt="" height="139" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br />  </div> </div> <div> <strong><a href="https://www.transparency.org/cpi2014#1" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">2014 Corruption Perceptions Index</a></strong><br /> Transparency International<br /> Poorly equipped schools, counterfeit medicine and elections decided by money are just some of the consequences of public sector corruption. Bribes and backroom deals don’t just steal resources from the most vulnerable – they undermine justice and economic development, and destroy public trust in government and leaders. Based on expert opinion from around the world, the Corruption Perceptions Index measures the perceived levels of public sector corruption worldwide, and it paints an alarming picture. Not one single country gets a perfect score and more than two-thirds score below 50, on a scale from 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean).<br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/12/the-fall-of-facebook/382247/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Fall of Facebook</a></strong><br /> The Atlantic<br /> Facebook has won this round of the Internet.  Steadily, grindingly, it continues to take an ever greater share of our time and attention online. More than 800 million people use the site on an average day. Individuals are dependent on it to keep up not just with their friends but with their families. When a research company looked at how people use their phones, it found that they spend more time on Facebook than they do browsing the entire rest of the Web.  Digital-media companies have grown reliant on Facebook’s powerful distribution capabilities. They are piglets at the sow, squealing amongst their siblings for sustenance, by which I mean readers.</div> </div></div></div> Thu, 04 Dec 2014 14:38:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6893 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: Africa Stop Ebola https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-africa-stop-ebola <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><!--StartFragment -->People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.<br /><br /> Since the start of the current Ebola outbreak, music has been a part of efforts to sensitize and educate people about the disease. Artists in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, the three most affected countries, have produced several songs to inform people that <a href="https://allafrica.com/stories/201407090813.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">the virus is real</a> and "<a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-ebola-town" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">don't touch your friend</a>".<br /><br /> The latest song to hit the airwaves, "<a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/africastopebola" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Africa Stop Ebola</a>", was written by <a href="https://myspace.com/kandiakora" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Kandia Kora </a>and <a href="https://www.sekoukouyate.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Sekou Kouyaté</a>, both of whom are from Guinea and are among the performers. It is based on lyrics outlined by <a href="https://steinhardt.nyu.edu/faculty_bios/view/Carlos_Chirinos" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Carlos Chirinos</a>, a professor at New York University who specializes in music, radio and social change. The lyrics express messages of caution and comfort, warning people not to touch the bodies of the sick or deceased and encouraging them to trust doctors, wash their hands, and take proactive steps if they feel the symptoms of Ebola.<br /><br /> The song aims to build confidence in the public health sector through the cachet of the artists. Across West Africa, music, theater, and radio are popular media to spread public information, and performers are well- respected public figures with enough social weight that people to listen to them.<br /><br /> In order to ensure the song's <a href="https://www.afp.com/en/news/radio-tribal-languages-spreads-ebola-message#.VFDeRbgli6w.twitter" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">messages are clear regardless</a> of the level of literacy or education of the listeners, it is performed in French and local languages widely understood across the region.<br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-118 asset-video"> <strong > Africa Stop Ebola </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><iframe width="854" height="510" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ruYQY6z3mV8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-desc field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"></div></div></div></div> </div> <p> </div></div></div> Wed, 12 Nov 2014 16:10:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6871 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-188 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="139" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><a href="https://www.cnn.com/2014/11/03/tech/is-the-internet-broken/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>Is the Internet broken, and can it even be fixed?</strong></a><br /> CNN<br /> Our modern global communications infrastructure still relies on core principles that were defined when the Internet had only a few thousand users. We have faster computers, more storage space, and more people using the network, but worryingly, some of the key assumptions haven't changed. As an example, take the protocol that helps determine how data gets to its destination. Different networks in the Internet "advertise" routes to deliver data to other networks, with the most efficient candidate being chosen.<br /><br /><a href="https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/142324/john-chambers-and-wim-elfrink/the-future-of-cities" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>The Future of Cities</strong></a><strong> </strong><br /> Foreign Affairs<br /> As much as the Internet has already changed the world, it is the Web’s next phase that will bring the biggest opportunities, revolutionizing the way we live, work, play, and learn. That next phase, which some call the Internet of Things and which we call the Internet of Everything, is the intelligent connection of people, processes, data, and things. Although it once seemed like a far-off idea, it is becoming a reality for businesses, governments, and academic institutions worldwide. Today, half the world’s population has access to the Internet; by 2020, two-thirds will be connected. Likewise, some 13.5 billion devices are connected to the Internet today; by 2020, we expect that number to climb to 50 billion.<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Thu, 06 Nov 2014 14:31:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6868 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: How (un)equal is East Africa? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-how-unequal-east-africa <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.<br /><br /> The 85 richest individuals in the world own as much as 3.5 billion of the poorest people, according to <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/research/working-few" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Oxfam</a>. It's a staggering statistic, but it has friends. <br /><br /> The <a href="https://publications.credit-suisse.com/tasks/render/file/?fileID=5521F296-D460-2B88-081889DB12817E02" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">2014 Global Wealth Databook</a> by Credit Suisse reports the bottom 50% of the world's population own less than 1% of its wealth, the richest 10% hold 87%, and the top 1% alone possess 48.2%. <br /><br /> The International Monetary Fund and World Bank Group also stated in the <a href="https://media.worldbank.org/secure/gmr-2014/GMR2014-2015_Overview_Embargo.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Global Monitoring Report</a> that while the number of people living in extreme poverty is decreasing, the gap between the haves and the have nots is increasing. Today, the world's richest 10% earn 9.5 times more than the poorest 10% of the world. Twenty-five years ago, they earned 7 times more than their less fortunate peers.<br /><br /> Taking a closer look at East Africa, <a href="https://mtega.com/2014/10/inequality/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Ben Taylor</a> (mtega), an Open Development Consultant with <a href="https://twaweza.org/" target="_blank" title="Twaweza - Ni Sisi" rel="nofollow">Twaweza</a>, finds that the richest 1% in East Africa own as much wealth as the poorest 91%. The six wealthiest individuals in the region own as much as 50% of the region’s population or 66 million people.<br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-115 asset-video"> <strong > How (un)equal is East Africa? </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><iframe width="854" height="510" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/3TLmbl-o4Bs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-desc field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"></div></div></div></div> </div> </div></div></div> Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:28:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6859 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-185 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="139" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><strong><a href="https://ati.publishwhatyoufund.org/index-2014/results/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Aid Transparency Index 2014</a></strong><br /> Publish What You Fund<br /> The 2014 ATI results follow the trends observed in previous years. A lead group of organisations are making significant and continuous improvements to the information they publish on their current aid activities – and many others have taken steps towards improving their publication in 2014 – but the majority have not made significant progress and continue to lag behind.<br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2014/oct/14/global-development-communications-campaigns-strategy?CMP=twt_gu" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">12 ways to communicate development more effectively</a></strong><br /> The Guardian<br /> From fundraising to behaviour change, communications is key to development work. <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2014/oct/03/live-qa-what-is-the-future-of-global-development-communications" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Our panel</a> explain how to do it better. <strong>Sina Odugbemi, </strong>senior communications officer (policy), <a href="https://www.worldbank.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Bank</a>, Washington DC, USA, <a href="https://twitter.com/WorldBank" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">@WorldBank</a>:</p> <ul><li> <strong>Make a case for development spending:</strong> Polls in Europe consistently show that support for development is wide but shallow. This is due to the limited power of emotive campaigns. People need to know if any of their money is doing permanent good or whether the cynics are right. That kind of case-making is, sadly, not done consistently and rigorously.</li> <li> <strong>Avoid promoting quick fixes:</strong> What that does is provoke disillusionment down the road. We need to discourage young people particularly from thinking complex problems can be solved with a rush of energy and cool new tools. We need to be communicating that many tough challenges will require stamina and sustained effort and commitment.</li> </ul></div></div></div> Thu, 16 Oct 2014 13:39:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6847 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-179 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="139" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/world-29040793?ocid=socialflow_twitter" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>Corruption 'impoverishes and kills millions</strong>'</a><br /> BBC<br /> An estimated $1tn (£600bn) a year is being taken out of poor countries and millions of lives are lost because of corruption, according to campaigners. A report by the anti-poverty organisation One says much of the progress made over the past two decades in tackling extreme poverty has been put at risk by corruption and crime. Corrupt activities include the use of phantom firms and money laundering. The report blames corruption for 3.6 million deaths every year. If action were taken to end secrecy that allows corruption to thrive - and if the recovered revenues were invested in health - the group calculates that many deaths could be prevented in low-income countries.<br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/best-and-worst-places-build-more-roads-180952486/?no-ist" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Best and Worst Places to Build More Roads</a></strong><br /> Smithsonian<br /> Roads are taking over the planet. By the middle of this century, so many new roadways are expected to appear that their combined length would circle Earth more than 600 times. To build critical connections while preserving biodiversity, we need a global road map, scientists <a href="https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13717" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">argue today in the journal <em>Nature</em></a>. And as a first step, the international team has identified areas where new roads would be most useful and those where such development would likely be in conflict with nature.<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Thu, 04 Sep 2014 13:48:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6808 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere