Syndicate content

Media (R)evolutions: Where people get their news depends on their age

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

We have known for years that people are getting their news from an increasing array of sources -- from traditional print and radio to internet and social media. How people consume news, moreover, varies a great deal from country to country.  In many developed countries television and online news are the most frequently accessed sources, while print newspapers have declined significantly. In contrast, newspapers are thriving in some middle- and low-income countries where both print and online circulations are popular. Social media is also growing as a source for news, but is doing so unevenly

However, the state of news consumption looks even more interesting- and trend lines emerge- when generational differences are considered. With age segmentation, we can see that online news is the most popular source for young people aged 18-24 who have grown up with the Internet, while TV is most popular with adults older than 55.  This is important to note because current estimates from the United Nations Population Fund indicate that there are approximately 1.8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and 24 in the world, and many of them live in developing countries where mobile devices that provide access to online news are increasingly common.

Main Source of News by Age

The infographic is based on a study commissioned by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.  Research was conducted by YouGov using an online questionnaire in late January/early February of this year. 

Core questions were asked in France, Germany, Denmark, Finland, Spain, Italy, Japan, Brazil, Australia, Ireland the US, as well as the UK, where there was a slightly longer questionnaire.  Since this is an online survey, the results will underrepresent the consumption habits of people who are not online (typically older, less affluent, and with limited formal education).  For more specific country-by-country data, please read the full report.

Follow PublicSphereWB on Twitter!
 
Source: Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism Digital News Report 2015

Add new comment