land titling https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/3751/all en Going in-depth: A qualitative application of Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (WEAI) https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/going-depth-qualitative-application-women-s-empowerment-agriculture-index-weai <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="Photo courtesy of Sonia Akter" height="240" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/akter_photo_1.jpg" style="float:left" title="Photo courtesy of Sonia Akter" width="320" />Empowerment is an intangible, multidimensional and culturally defined concept. This presents major challenges for researchers, development practitioners, and donors seeking to measure women’s empowerment. <em>How do we know if women are empowered through a particular intervention or initiative? And how can we measure women’s empowerment in an effective, robust, and practical manner? </em><br /><br /> To try and gain a better understanding of the global landscape of women’s empowerment in agriculture, our research team—comprised of researchers from the National University of Singapore and the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)—combined elements of one of the most common tools used to measure empowerment, the quantitative <a href="https://www.ifpri.org/publication/womens-empowerment-agriculture-index" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Women Empowerment in Agriculture Index</a> (WEAI), with the qualitative approach of <a href="https://www.odi.org/publications/5695-focus-group-discussion" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Focus Group Discussions</a> (FGDs). In addition to expanding upon the tool, we expanded the geographical scope of the study of empowerment in agriculture, which has typically focused on Sub Saharan Africa. We collected qualitative cross-country data from four Southeast Asian countries (Myanmar, Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines) and explored overall regional trends as well as intra-regional variation in women’s empowerment in Southeast Asian agriculture.<br /><br /> Our research demonstrates that focus group discussions offer a valuable complement to traditional quantitative instruments, but also bring some challenges.<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Mon, 30 Apr 2018 17:12:00 +0000 Sonia Akter 7787 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere #5 from 2016: Land Tenure: What have we learned four years after approving a set of international land tenure guidelines? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/5-2016-land-tenure-what-have-we-learned-four-years-after-approving-set-international-land-tenure <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <strong><em>Our Top Ten blog posts by readership in 2016.<span> </span></em></strong><em>This post was <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/land-tenure-what-have-we-learned-four-years-after-approving-set-international-land-tenure-guidelines" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">originally published </a>on June 13, 2016.  </em><br /><br />   <figure class="image" style="float:left"><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/7439971728_9af73454e6_z.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="191" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/7439971728_9af73454e6_z.jpg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:100%" title="Photo by Links Media/USAID" width="340" /></a> <figcaption><em>Asilya Gemmal displays her land certificate, given by<br /> the Ethiopian government, with USAID assistance.</em></figcaption></figure> "Congratulations, today your baby is four years old,” Iris Krebber, DFID/UK recently emailed me.  Iris was not referring to a child, but rather the Voluntary Guidelines for the Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forest (VGGT), an agreement I had the challenging pleasure of bringing to life by chairing a UN negotiation process that resulted in the first globally agreed recommendations for addressing land, fisheries, and forests governance.  Often colleagues don’t remember my name, but they call me “the land guy,” which I suppose is better than the “dirt guy.”<br /><br /> The call for an international set of guidelines came from many quarters between 2008 and 2010, but was largely driven by concerns raised in international fora by civil society, member states, development partners, and the private sector. These concerns primarily pertained to food security (and specifically food price spikes) and access, and rights to land and other resources by small, medium and large scale producers as they impact investments in food production systems.  <br />   <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/cfs_2.png" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="136" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/cfs_2.png" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="280" /></a></div> One of the more notable concerns driving the development of the Guidelines was related to large scale land acquisitions (including what some organizations may sometimes refer to as “land grabbing”). Through a technical process FAO developed the initial draft of the Guidelines, and then initiated a process of input and consultation over two years before the document was given to the UN Committee for World Food Security (UN CFS) for negotiation.<br /><br /> As the subject of land rights can be very political (no international guidance can address the plethora of land challenges from Latin America to Africa to Asia and beyond with one-solution fits-all-problems), and civil society organizations, member states, and the private sector often have different views and needs in achieving their respective objectives, you can imagine it was not an easy task for CFS to agree to a set of guidelines. <p> </div></div></div> Wed, 04 Jan 2017 16:04:00 +0000 Gregory Myers 7599 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Land Tenure: What have we learned four years after approving a set of international land tenure guidelines? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/land-tenure-what-have-we-learned-four-years-after-approving-set-international-land-tenure-guidelines <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><figure class="image" style="float:left"> <img alt="" height="191" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/7439971728_9af73454e6_z.jpg" title="Photo by Links Media/USAID" width="340" /> <figcaption> <em>Asilya Gemmal displays her land certificate, given by<br /> the Ethiopian government, with USAID assistance.</em></figcaption> </figure> “Congratulations, today your baby is four years old,” Iris Krebber, DFID/UK recently emailed me. Iris was not referring to a child, but rather the Voluntary Guidelines for the Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forest (VGGT), an agreement I had the challenging pleasure of bringing to life by chairing a UN negotiation process that resulted in the first globally agreed recommendations for addressing land, fisheries, and forests governance. Often colleagues don’t remember my name, but they call me “the land guy,” which I suppose is better than the “dirt guy.”<br /> <br /> The call for an international set of guidelines came from many quarters between 2008 and 2010, but was largely driven by concerns raised in international fora by civil society, member states, development partners, and the private sector. These concerns primarily pertained to food security (and specifically food price spikes) and access, and rights to land and other resources by small, medium and large scale producers as they impact investments in food production systems. &nbsp;<br /> <br /> <img alt="" height="136" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/cfs_2.png" style="float:right" title="" width="280" />One of the more notable concerns driving the development of the Guidelines was related to large scale land acquisitions (including what some organizations may sometimes refer to as “land grabbing”). Through a technical process FAO developed the initial draft of the Guidelines, and then initiated a process of input and consultation over two years before the document was given to the UN Committee for World Food Security (UN CFS) for negotiation.<br /> <br /> As the subject of land rights can be very political (no international guidance can address the plethora of land challenges from Latin America to Africa to Asia and beyond with one-solution fits-all-problems), and civil society organizations, member states, and the private sector often have different views and needs in achieving their respective objectives, you can imagine it was not an easy task for CFS to agree to a set of guidelines. <p> </div></div></div> Mon, 13 Jun 2016 14:51:00 +0000 Gregory Myers 7428 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere