Education https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/259/all en Weekly wire: The global forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-322 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" style="float:right" title="" width="180" /></a><strong>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br />  </p> <p> <strong><a href="https://blog.bufferapp.com/state-of-social-2018?utm_source=newsletter&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=ind_awe_jan18&amp;mc_cid=19873f2661&amp;mc_eid=2d406bead1" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The State of Social 2018 Report: Your Guide to Latest Social Media Marketing Research [New Data]</a></strong><br /><strong>Buffer</strong><br /> What’s in store for the social media industry in 2018? The way consumers use social media channels is constantly evolving and as marketers and entrepreneurs, we need to adapt to these changes. To better understand these changes, plus what’s ahead for 2018 and beyond we teamed up with Social Media Week to collect data from over 1,700 marketers and create the State of Social Media 2018 report. The report shows us how marketers, from businesses of all sizes, are approaching social media marketing.<br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://marketbrief.edweek.org/marketplace-k-12/world-bank-unveils-new-tool-for-measuring-countries-ed-performance-and-economic-growth/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Bank’s ‘Global Dataset’ Offers New Way for Comparing Countries’ Educational Performance</a></strong><br /><strong>Market Brief Ed Week</strong><br /> For years, efforts to explore and compare the educational performance of impoverished countries–and by implication, their economic potential–have been stymied by a lack of useful data. An ambitious new analysis by the World Bank aims to change that. A “global dataset” unveiled by the international development organization uses statistical methods to put the results of much-publicized international tests like the PISA and TIMSS–which many poor nations do not take part in–on a comparable scale as regional exams commonly used by developing countries. The result is a new method for comparing the test performance of rich and poor nations that World Bank researchers say hasn’t been accomplished before.<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Thu, 22 Feb 2018 21:08:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7782 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere #6 from 2017: What is a systems approach, anyway? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/6-2017-what-systems-approach-anyway <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em>Our Top Ten blog posts by readership in 2017. This post was <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/what-systems-approach-anyway" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">originally posted </a>on February 27, 2017.</em><br /><br /><span>“It makes me a little crazy when you keep saying systems.” – Jowhor Ile, in<span> </span></span><a href="https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/250685/and-after-many-days-by-jowhor-ile/9781101903148/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><em>And After Many Days</em></a><br /><br /><span>At home, we have a porchlight at the entrance to our house. If I flip the switch for that light, there is about a 50-50 chance it will turn on. The reason? There is<span> </span></span><em>another</em><span><span> </span>switch in the basement that controls the electricity flow to the porch, and the porchlight will only come on if both switches are on.</span><br /><br /><span>This – slightly adapted – analogy came from<span> </span></span><a href="https://www.cgdev.org/expert/justin-sandefur" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Justin Sandefur at the Center for Global Development</a><span>, in an effort to explain what a systems approach is and how it can improve development programming.</span><br /><br /><span>If you’re like us, there is<span> </span></span><a href="https://scholar.google.com/scholar?as_ylo=2013&amp;q=education+systems+approach&amp;hl=en&amp;as_sdt=0,9" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">so much talk about systems</a><span><span> </span>that it can be easy to get lost. At a recent event, we asked a mixed group of operational teams and researchers, “How confident are you that you know what a systems approach is?” Nearly<span> </span></span><strong>40 percent</strong><span><span> </span>had little to no idea.</span></p> <p> <span><strong>How confident are you that you know what a systems approach is?</strong></span></p> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <img alt="" height="337" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_4.png" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:middle; max-width:none; float:left" title="" width="440" /></div> <p> To take education as an example, a systems approach to education recognizes the following:<br /><br /> 1. An education system is made up of different actors (students, teachers, administrators, political leaders), accountability relationships (management, politics), and design elements (financing, information) (see<span> </span><a href="https://www.riseprogramme.org/sites/www.riseprogramme.org/files/RISE_WP-005_Pritchett.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Pritchett</a><span> </span>or<span> </span><a href="https://www.riseprogramme.org/content/what-do-we-mean-coherent-education-systems" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Scur</a>).<br /><br /> 2. Changes to one part of the system are moderated by other parts of the system. For example, the effectiveness of investments to get children to school will be limited (or enhanced) by the quality of the schooling.<br /><br /> 3. A change to one part of the system leads to changes in other parts of the system: increased public provision of school supplies won’t increase learning if parents subsequently reduce their pre-existing investments in school supplies, as indicated by what happened in India and Zambia (<a href="https://pubs.aeaweb.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1257/app.5.2.29" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Das et al.</a>).</p> <p> A systems approach seeks to explicitly take these separate components and their interlinking movements into account.</p> <p> Three models demonstrate how a systems approach can apply at each point in the reform process: One identifies the current performance of each element of the system, one answers questions of what happens as elements of that system change, and one seeks to leverage this information to improve reforms.<br /></div></div></div> Wed, 03 Jan 2018 17:12:00 +0000 David Evans 7773 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Education amidst Fragility, Conflict and Violence https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/education-amidst-fragility-conflict-and-violence <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt=" Maria Fleischmann / World Bank" height="213" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/8249943505_64b9ccc55b_z.jpg" style="float:left" title=" Maria Fleischmann / World Bank" width="320" />Access to schooling and quality learning can be undermined by various manifestations of fragility, conflict and violence (FCV). The effect of different elements of FCV on education has both immediate and long lasting impacts on children’s learning, their well-being and their future prospects.<br />  <br /> In different forms, FCV manifestations contribute to a denial of the right to education, whether from government failures, a violent ecosystem, and the treatment of displaced children and divisions within schools, attacks on schools or the language of instruction. This can include the ways in which teachers and principals treat lower castes, children with disabilities, or minority groups; the threat or real violence against girls; as well as how textbooks portray history and culture.  These issues exist globally, not just in ‘fragile states’.<br />  <br /> Over the past two decades, greater attention has focused on the impact that long-term complex humanitarian emergencies, fragile states, and contexts of protracted crises on education. What has received less attention is the aggregate impact of various forms of negative conflict and intra-personal violence.<br />  <br /> There are three entry points to consider for FCV: protracted crises; conflict as the basis of exclusion; direct and indirect forms of intra-personal violence. </p> </div></div></div> Tue, 18 Jul 2017 18:11:00 +0000 Stephen Commins 7744 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-311 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <strong><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_7.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_7.jpg" style="float:right" title="Flickr user fdecomit" width="180" /></a>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br /><br /><strong><a href="https://ssir.org/articles/entry/want_a_better_safer_world_build_a_finance_facility_for_education" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Want a Better, Safer World? Build a Finance Facility for Education</a></strong><br /><strong>Stanford Social Innovation Review</strong><br /> The global education crisis can seem overwhelming. Today, there are 263 million children and young people throughout the world who are not in school, and 60 million of them live in dangerous emergencies. Fast forward to 2030, and our world could be one where more than half of all children—800 million out of 1.6 billion—will lack basic secondary-level skills. Almost all of them will live in low- and middle-income countries. What’s more, many of those children will never have the chance for an education at all; others who do attend school will drop out after only a few years. Their job prospects will be poor—their likelihood of becoming the entrepreneurs who will drive the next stage of global growth even more uncertain. This is a prediction of course—not a done deal by any means—and yet many low- and middle-income country leaders fear that this grim possibility will become their reality. They understand that lack of quality education will leave their countries unable to gain economic ground or improve the well-being of their citizens. And they realize that large numbers of young people—who should be a huge asset to their countries—can easily shift to the liability column and become sources of instability if they are deprived of their fundamental right to an education.</p> <p> <strong><a href="https://businesscommission.org/our-work/business-human-rights-and-the-sdgs" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Business, Human Rights, and the Sustainable Development Goals</a></strong><br /><strong>Business and Sustainable Development Commission.</strong><br /> Companies’ single greatest opportunity to contribute to human development lies in advancing respect for the human rights of workers and communities touched by their value chains, according to the new paper, Business, Human Rights, and the Sustainable Development Goals, authored by Shift and commissioned by the Business and Sustainable Development Commission. People around the world are affected by business activities every day, many very positively. Roughly 2 billion people are touched by the value chains of multinational companies. Yet these same people are exposed to the harms that can also result when their human rights are not respected by business, cutting them off from the benefits of development.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 01 Jun 2017 13:30:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7732 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: #GirlsCount https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-girlscount <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <strong><span>People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</span></strong></p> <p> Getting access to quality education is one of the most pressing challenges. Around <a href="https://datatopics.worldbank.org/sdgatlas/SDG-04-quality-education.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">61 million primary school-age children remained out of school in 2014</a>, even though globally the enrollment in primary education in developing countries reached 91 percent.<br />  </p> <div> <img alt="" height="307" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/sdg_atlas.png" title="" width="700" /></div> <p> <br /> Source: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Institute for Statistics; WDI (<a href="https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.PRE.ENRR?view=map" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">SE.PRE.ENRR</a>, <a href="https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.PRM.ENRR?view=map" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">SE.PRM.ENRR</a>, <a href="https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.SEC.ENRR?view=map" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">SE.SEC.ENRR</a>, <a href="https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.TER.ENRR?view=map" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">SE.TER.ENRR</a>).<br /><br /> Although a global issue, it affects some groups more disproportionally than others. In many countries around the world girls are more likely to be denied education than boys. In order to raise awareness about the gender inequality and to urge global leaders to prioritize girls’ education, <a href="https://www.one.org/us/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The One Campaign</a> has launched a digital campaign #<a href="https://girlscount.one.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">GirlsCount</a>.</p> </div></div></div> Wed, 24 May 2017 18:15:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7726 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Blog post of the month: Strengthening governance is top-of-mind for opinion leaders in developing countries https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/blog-post-month-strengthening-governance-top-mind-opinion-leaders-developing-countries <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> Each month <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation </a>shares the blog post that generated the most interest and discussion. For April 2017, the featured blog post is "Strengthening governance is top-of-mind for opinion leaders in developing countries" by Jing Guo.</h4> Capable, efficient, and accountable government institutions are essential for a country’s sustainable development. The most recent polls of opinion leaders in World Bank client countries confirmed that addressing governance is now at the top of countries’ development priorities.  <br />  <br /> The World Bank Group annually surveys nearly 10,000 influencers in 40+ countries across the globe to assess their views on development issues, including opinions about public sector governance and reform.  In the past five years, the survey reached more than 35,000 opinion leaders working in government, parliament, private sector, civil society, media, and academia in more than 120 developing countries.<br />  <br /> Data from the most recent 2016 survey indicate that public sector governance/reform (i.e., government effectiveness, public financial management, public expenditure, and fiscal system reform) is regarded as the most important development priority across 45 countries by a plurality of opinion leaders (34%), surpassing education (30%) and job creation (22%). (1)<br />  <br /> The chart below shows that concerns over governance have grown substantially among opinion leaders since 2012.<div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-366 asset-tableau"> <strong > Chart 1 </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><iframe align="middle" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" id="datawrapper-chart-v9HzB" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" msallowfullscreen="msallowfullscreen" oallowfullscreen="oallowfullscreen" width="100%" height="100%" scrolling="no" src="//datawrapper.dwcdn.net/v9HzB/1/" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen"></iframe><script type="text/javascript">if("undefined"==typeof window.datawrapper)window.datawrapper={};window.datawrapper["v9HzB"]={},window.datawrapper["v9HzB"].embedDeltas={"100":675,"200":486,"300":443,"400":400,"500":400,"600":374,"700":357,"800":357,"900":357,"1000":357},window.datawrapper["v9HzB"].iframe=document.getElementById("datawrapper-chart-v9HzB"),window.datawrapper["v9HzB"].iframe.style.height=window.datawrapper["v9HzB"].embedDeltas[Math.min(1e3,Math.max(100*Math.floor(window.datawrapper["v9HzB"].iframe.offsetWidth/100),100))]+"px",window.addEventListener("message",function(a){if("undefined"!=typeof a.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var b in a.data["datawrapper-height"])if("v9HzB"==b)window.datawrapper["v9HzB"].iframe.style.height=a.data["datawrapper-height"][b]+"px"});</script><br /> &nbsp;</div></div></div> Tue, 25 Apr 2017 19:18:00 +0000 Jing Guo 7701 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Strengthening governance is top-of-mind for opinion leaders in developing countries https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/strengthening-governance-top-mind-opinion-leaders-developing-countries <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Capable, efficient, and accountable government institutions are essential for a country’s sustainable development. The most recent polls of opinion leaders in World Bank client countries confirmed that addressing governance is now at the top of countries’ development priorities.  <br />  <br /> The World Bank Group annually surveys nearly 10,000 influencers in 40+ countries across the globe to assess their views on development issues, including opinions about public sector governance and reform.  In the past five years, the survey reached more than 35,000 opinion leaders working in government, parliament, private sector, civil society, media, and academia in more than 120 developing countries.<br />  <br /> Data from the most recent 2016 survey indicate that public sector governance/reform (i.e., government effectiveness, public financial management, public expenditure, and fiscal system reform) is regarded as the most important development priority across 45 countries by a plurality of opinion leaders (34%), surpassing education (30%) and job creation (22%). (1)<br />  <br /> The chart below shows that concerns over governance have grown substantially among opinion leaders since 2012.<br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-353 asset-tableau"> <strong > Chart 1 </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><iframe align="middle" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" id="datawrapper-chart-v9HzB" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" msallowfullscreen="msallowfullscreen" oallowfullscreen="oallowfullscreen" width="100%" height="100%" scrolling="no" src="//datawrapper.dwcdn.net/v9HzB/1/" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen"></iframe><script type="text/javascript">if("undefined"==typeof window.datawrapper)window.datawrapper={};window.datawrapper["v9HzB"]={},window.datawrapper["v9HzB"].embedDeltas={"100":675,"200":486,"300":443,"400":400,"500":400,"600":374,"700":357,"800":357,"900":357,"1000":357},window.datawrapper["v9HzB"].iframe=document.getElementById("datawrapper-chart-v9HzB"),window.datawrapper["v9HzB"].iframe.style.height=window.datawrapper["v9HzB"].embedDeltas[Math.min(1e3,Math.max(100*Math.floor(window.datawrapper["v9HzB"].iframe.offsetWidth/100),100))]+"px",window.addEventListener("message",function(a){if("undefined"!=typeof a.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var b in a.data["datawrapper-height"])if("v9HzB"==b)window.datawrapper["v9HzB"].iframe.style.height=a.data["datawrapper-height"][b]+"px"});</script><br /> &nbsp;</div></div></div> Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:31:00 +0000 Jing Guo 7678 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere KIAT Guru: Engaging communities to improve education in Indonesia https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/kiat-guru-engaging-communities-improve-education-indonesia <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Indonesia successfully <a href="https://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/657281468038129986/Integrated-Safeguards-Data-Sheet-Concept-Stage-KIAT-GURU-KINERJA-DAN-AKUNTABILITAS-GURU-IMPROVING-TEACHER-PERFORMANCE-AND-ACCOUNTABILITY-P159191" target="_blank">reduced its poverty rate</a> over the last two decades. Yet, this growth was accompanied by one of the fastest increases in inequality in East Asia and the Pacific.&nbsp; While the poverty rate in urban areas has fallen to 8.2%, in remote and rural areas it remains around 14%.<br /> <br /> This inequality is exacerbated by the persistent poor quality of public services, such as education, in rural and remote areas. While various government initiatives have improved access to education, <a href="https://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2013/03/14/spending-more-or-spending-better-improving-education-financing-in-indonesia" target="_blank">quality and equity remain major challenges</a> for those in rural and remote areas.<br /> &nbsp; <div style="width: 210px; height: 165px; padding-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 8px; float: right;"> <img alt="" height="118" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/voices/files/voices/sustainable_communities_v2-200-low.jpg" style="border: 1px solid rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; border-image: none !important !important;" title="" width="200" /><br /> <img alt="" height="5" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/sustainablecities/files/sustainablecities/teal-square-resized-high.png" style="border: 1px solid rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; border-image: none !important !important;" title="" width="12" /><strong><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/voices/introducing-our-new-sustainable-communities-blog-series" style="color: rgb(59, 179, 188); font-size: 12px; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">About this series</a></strong><br /> <img alt="" height="5" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/sustainablecities/files/sustainablecities/teal-square-resized-high.png" style="border: 1px solid rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; border-image: none !important !important;" title="" width="12" /><strong><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/category/tags/sustainable-communities" style="color: rgb(59, 179, 188); font-size: 12px; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">More blog posts</a></strong></div> <br /> To address these issues, the World Bank has partnered with the government of Indonesia to launch a pilot project called “<a href="https://projects.worldbank.org/P159191/?lang=en&amp;tab=overview" target="_blank">KIAT Guru</a>,” which aims to improve teacher presence, teacher service quality, and student learning outcomes, while enhancing community engagement and participation in remote areas.<br /> <br /> “We [have] two different mechanisms. One of them is community empowerment… The community develops a service agreement with schools so they can agree upon the five to seven indicators that they think are a priority,” says Dewi Susanti, Senior Social Development Specialist, who leads the project.<br /> <br /> In this video, Dewi Susanti and World Bank Senior Director Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez (<a href="https://www.twitter.com/Ede_WBG" target="_blank">@Ede_WBG</a>) discuss the <a href="https://projects.worldbank.org/P159191/?lang=en&amp;tab=overview" target="_blank">KIAT Guru project</a> and the lessons learned from its early stages. &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-339 asset-video"> <strong > KIAT Guru project </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><iframe src="//cdnapisec.kaltura.com/p/619672/sp/61967200/embedIframeJs/uiconf_id/24449191/partner_id/619672?iframeembed=true&playerId=kaltura_player_1489511285&entry_id=1_kkb5ph44&flashvars[streamerType]=auto" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe></div></div></div></div> </div></div></div></div> Thu, 16 Mar 2017 15:58:00 +0000 Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez 7661 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere What is a systems approach, anyway? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/what-systems-approach-anyway <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">“It makes me a little crazy when you keep saying systems.” – Jowhor Ile, in <a href="https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/250685/and-after-many-days-by-jowhor-ile/9781101903148/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><em>And After Many Days</em></a><br /><br /> At home, we have a porchlight at the entrance to our house. If I flip the switch for that light, there is about a 50-50 chance it will turn on. The reason? There is <em>another</em> switch in the basement that controls the electricity flow to the porch, and the porchlight will only come on if both switches are on.<br /><br /> This – slightly adapted – analogy came from <a href="https://www.cgdev.org/expert/justin-sandefur" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Justin Sandefur at the Center for Global Development</a>, in an effort to explain what a systems approach is and how it can improve development programming.<br /><br /> If you’re like us, there is <a href="https://scholar.google.com/scholar?as_ylo=2013&amp;q=education+systems+approach&amp;hl=en&amp;as_sdt=0,9" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">so much talk about systems</a> that it can be easy to get lost. At a recent event, we asked a mixed group of operational teams and researchers, “How confident are you that you know what a systems approach is?” Nearly <strong>40 percent</strong> had little to no idea.<br /><br /><span><strong>How confident are you that you know what a systems approach is?</strong></span> <div> <img alt="" height="337" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_4.png" style="float:left" title="" width="440" /></div> <p> To take education as an example, a systems approach to education recognizes the following:<br /><br /> 1. An education system is made up of different actors (students, teachers, administrators, political leaders), accountability relationships (management, politics), and design elements (financing, information) (see <a href="https://www.riseprogramme.org/sites/www.riseprogramme.org/files/RISE_WP-005_Pritchett.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Pritchett</a> or <a href="https://www.riseprogramme.org/content/what-do-we-mean-coherent-education-systems" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Scur</a>).<br /><br /> 2. Changes to one part of the system are moderated by other parts of the system. For example, the effectiveness of investments to get children to school will be limited (or enhanced) by the quality of the schooling.</div></div></div> Mon, 27 Feb 2017 17:36:00 +0000 David Evans 7646 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-296 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <strong><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/2_1.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/2_1.jpg" style="float:right" title="" width="180" /></a>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br /><br /><strong><a href="https://www.csis.org/analysis/recurring-storms" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Recurring Storms: Food Insecurity, Political Instability, and Conflict</a><br /> Center for Strategic and International Studies</strong><br /> Renewed and expanded international collaboration to anticipate and prepare for recurring storms of food insecurity is essential. Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Syria are examples that vividly underscore the explosiveness of situations in which people find themselves unable to get the food they want and need. The experiences of post-conflict countries highlight some critical issues that need to be prioritized in order to regain sustainable food security. Averting future storms will require the recognition that food security challenges will extend long beyond 2030, political leadership must be visibly committed to these issues, and actions to reduce fragmentation of effort will be critical.</p> <p> <strong><a href="https://www.dawn.com/news/1314377/world-radio-day" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Radio Day</a></strong><br /><strong>Dawn</strong><br /> RADIO remains the most dynamic and engaging mediums in the 21st century, offering new ways to interact and participate. This powerful communication tool and low-cost medium can reach the widest audience, including remote communities and vulnerable people such as the illiterate, the disabled, women, youth and the poor. Radio offers these communities a platform to intervene in public debate, irrespective of their educational level. It provides an opportunity to participate in policy and decision-making processes, and to protect and promote the diversity of cultural expression. The impact of radio is at different levels: it is an essential tool in times of disaster management as an effective medium to reach affected people when other means of communication are disrupted; it is a way of promoting gender equality by providing rural women access to knowledge and support; finally, it is inclusive, engaging youth in the media as catalysts of change.</div></div></div> Thu, 16 Feb 2017 14:30:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7633 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: #GirlsNotBrides https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-girlsnotbrides <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</strong><br /><br /> Child marriage is a violation of human rights and needs to be addressed worldwide by citizens, community organizations, local, and federal government agencies, as well as international organizations and civil society groups. Child marriage cuts across borders, religions, cultures, and ethnicities and can be found all over the world. Although sometimes boys are subjected to early marriage, girls are far more likely to be married at a young age.<br /><br /> This is where we stand today: in developing countries, <a href="https://www.unfpa.org/child-marriage" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">1 in every 3 girls is married before the age of 18</a>. And 1 in nine girls is married before turning 15. Try looking at it this way: the <a href="https://www.unfpa.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">United Nations Population Fund</a> (UNFPA) estimates that if current trends continue, worldwide, <a href="https://www.unfpa.org/sites/default/files/pub-pdf/MarryingTooYoung.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">142 million girls</a> will be married by 2020. Another prediction from a global partnership called <a href="https://www.girlsnotbrides.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Girls Not Brides</a> suggests, that if there is no reduction in child marriages, the global number of child brides will reach <a href="https://www.girlsnotbrides.org/where-does-it-happen/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">1.2 billion by 2050</a>.<br /><br /> Why is this such a critical issue? Child marriage undermines global effort to reduce poverty and boost shared prosperity, as it traps vulnerable individuals in a cycle of poverty. Child marriage deprives girls of educational opportunities. Often times, when girls are married at a young age, they are more likely to drop out of school and are at a higher risk of death due to early childbirth. According to the <a href="https://www.who.int/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Health Organization</a>, <a href="https://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs364/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">complications during pregnancy and childbirth are the second cause of death for 15-19 year-old girls globally. </a> <br /><br /> In order to raise awareness about child marriage in the Middle East, a Lebanon-based organization, <a href="https://www.kafa.org.lb/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">KAFA</a>, produced this video as a social experiment.<div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-322 asset-video"> <strong > Social epxeriment by KAFA </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="640" height="360" data="//www.youtube.com/v/p7lPgOEwbYw"> <param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/p7lPgOEwbYw" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> </object> </div></div></div></div> </div> <p> <strong>Source: </strong><a href="https://www.kafa.org.lb/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">KAFA Lebanon</a></p> </div></div></div> Wed, 15 Feb 2017 16:58:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7632 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Great Gatsby Goes to College https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/great-gatsby-goes-college <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div> <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/5061210124_62bb88baac_z.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="226" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/5061210124_62bb88baac_z.jpg" title="Image by Sean MacEntee via Flickr" width="680" /></a></div> </div> <p> <br /> Nick Carraway, the narrator in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, remembers his father saying, “Whenever you feel like criticizing anyone … just remember that all the people in this world haven't had the advantages that you've had.”<br /><br /> What advantages? For starters, wealth, power, and in today’s developed world - college.<br /><br /> In the U.S., the college wage premium has <a href="https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/lkatz/files/the_race_between_education_and_technology_the_evolution_of_u.s._educational_wage_differentials_1890_to_2005_1.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">risen rapidly since 1980</a> – causing a <a href="https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/lkatz/files/the_race_between_education_and_technology_the_evolution_of_u.s._educational_wage_differentials_1890_to_2005_1.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">widening earnings gap</a> between the college and non-college educated. Those with a bachelor’s degree <a href="https://polkgoestocollege.web.unc.edu/files/2015/08/earn-an-extra-800000-dollars-in-income-1.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">earn over $800,000 more</a> in lifetime income, on average, than those with high school diplomas. In the OECD, the college wage premium averages at <a href="https://oxrep.oxfordjournals.org/content/32/4/497.full" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">28 percent</a> for male, full-time working employees - ranging from 18 per cent in Sweden to 50 per cent in the Slovak Republic. <br /><br /> As higher education expanded, college wage premiums were expected to <a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/260627" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">decline</a>. So why are they high and, often, increasing?</p> <p> The consensus seems to point to increased computerization and automation in labor markets. Technology is expanding the demand for the college educated, at the expense of the non-college educated. This ‘<a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/25592375?seq=1%25252523page_scan_tab_contents" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">job polarization</a>’ in the labor market, manifests as the growth of high-education/high-wage jobs at the expense of middle-education/middle-wage jobs. This is increasingly visible not just in <a href="https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/aea/aer/2014/00000104/00000008/art00009" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">advanced economies</a>, but also in the <a href="https://www.worldbank.org/en/publication/wdr2016" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">developing world</a>. According to the <a href="https://www.worldbank.org/en/publication/wdr2016" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Word Development Report 2016 on Digital Dividends</a>, the share of middle-skilled employment is down in most developing countries for which detailed data are available.<br /><br /></div></div></div> Thu, 08 Dec 2016 18:15:00 +0000 Shwetlena Sabarwal 7583 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere How to achieve social transformation through innovation with Marcelo Cabrol https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/how-achieve-social-transformation-through-innovation-marcelo-cabrol <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <a href="https://www.iadb.org/en/about-us/departments/biographies,1347.html?bioid=69" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Marcelo Cabrol</a> is close to turn 50, and has more curiosity than ever for ideas that can transform the world. I interviewed Marcelo about how to achieve transformation in order to solve the many compelling social issues that our world faces. He says that there are two fundamental elements: understanding the problems we are trying to solve and listening.</p> <p> Marcelo tells the story about how the conversation about development has dramatically shifted over the past ten years. There are more participants involved in dialogue around poverty now, and that’s a huge opportunity to enrich the conversation. It is also why “everyone interested in development must become a student of the problems”, as Marcelo says, which means understanding the underlying causes of those problems. There’s no substitute for this when entrepreneurs are getting ready to sell their ideas for development.<br /><br /> Then, the ability to listen, together with an open mind, is essential to find a solution for the many ideas that are sprouting everywhere.</p> <p> Marcelo uses one of his dearest fields, education, to explain how this powerful combination can transform an entire sector and adapt it to the new demands and needs of the 21<sup>st</sup> century.</p> <p> Listen here:</p> <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-298 asset-tableau"> <strong > How to Achieve Social Transformation Through Innovation with Marcelo Cabrol </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="//w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/282307432&amp;color=ff5500"></iframe></div></div></div></div> </div></div></div></div> Thu, 03 Nov 2016 17:57:00 +0000 Enrique Rubio 7555 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Ask before you watch: How to get the most out of learning videos https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/ask-you-watch-how-get-most-out-learning-videos <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img alt="" height="213" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/3555425206_ef3d4b7d7a_z.jpg" style="float:right" title=" Joi Ito" width="320" />Welcome to the fourth blog of the technology aided gut (TAG) checks <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/just-new-year-s-resolution-time-learning" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">series</a>. In our last <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/knowing-what-we-don-t-know-web" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">post</a> we showed you how to be reasonably confident that the information you find from an online resource is accurate, especially when you do not have the subject matter expertise to ascertain its correctness. In the next two blogs, we will take a closer look at educationational videos - arguably the “hottest” format for knowledge exchange.<br />  <br /> This is a pragmatic blog for providing technical knowledge to adult professionals. So we are not going to address big questions like: <ul><li> <a href="https://hackeducation.com/2011/07/19/the-wrath-against-khan-why-some-educators-are-questioning-khan-academy" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Do they truly educate</a> or do they entertain you enough that you feel “educated?” (Hack Edcuation:<em>"<a href="https://hackeducation.com/2011/07/19/the-wrath-against-khan-why-some-educators-are-questioning-khan-academy" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Wrath Against Khan</a>”</em>)</li> <li> Are educational systems based on videos mostly about <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/20/opinion/the-trouble-with-online-education.html?_r=0" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">selling the dream of education</a> rather than education itself? (New York Times:<em>“<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/20/opinion/the-trouble-with-online-education.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Trouble With Online Education</a>”)</em></li> </ul> The debate rages on while the <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2013/02/09/global-education-market-reaches-4-4-trillion-and-is-growing/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">trillion dollar online education</a> industry blossoms.<br />  <br /> No matter which side of the aisle you are on in this big debate, if you are in the need to learn something useful (quickly) and you are choosing a web source to learn from- remember these five critical factors - and then decide whether to use a video or some other source. These factors may not guarantee the success of a learning session but ignoring them will most likely ensure the session’s failure.<br /><br /></div></div></div> Tue, 12 Jul 2016 16:06:00 +0000 Tanya Gupta 7456 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Blog post of the month: The 2016 Multidimensional Poverty Index was launched last week. What does it say? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/blog-post-month-2016-multidimensional-poverty-index-was-launched-last-week-what-does-it-say <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> Each month People, Spaces, Deliberation shares the blog post that generated the most interest and discussion. In June 2016, the featured blog post is "<a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/2016-multidimensional-poverty-index-was-launched-yesterday-what-does-it-say" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The 2016 Multidimensional Poverty Index was launched last week. What does it say?</a>" by Duncan Green.</h4> <p> <br /><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/mdi-tenindicators.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="241" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/mdi-tenindicators.jpg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:left" title=" OPHI" width="340" /></a>This is at the geeky, number-crunching end of my spectrum, but I think it’s worth a look (and anyway, they asked nicely). The <a href="https://www.ophi.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/Global-MPI-2016-2-pager.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">2016 Multi-Dimensional Poverty Index</a>was published yesterday. It now covers 102 countries in total, including 75 per cent of the world’s population, or 5.2 billion people. Of this proportion, 30 per cent of people (1.6 billion) are identified as multidimensionally poor.</p> <p> The Global MPI has 3 dimensions and 10 indicators (for details see <a href="https://www.ophi.org.uk/multidimensional-poverty-index/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">here</a> and the graphic, right). A person is identified as multidimensionally poor (or ‘MPI poor’) if they are deprived in at least one third of the dimensions. The MPI is calculated by multiplying the incidence of poverty (the percentage of people identified as MPI poor) by the average intensity of poverty across the poor. So it reflects both the share of people in poverty and the degree to which they are deprived.</p> <p> The MPI increasingly digs down below national level, giving separate results for 962 sub-national regions, which range from having 0% to 100% of people poor (see African map, below). It is also disaggregated by rural-urban areas for nearly all countries as well as by age.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 30 Jun 2016 16:18:00 +0000 Duncan Green 7448 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere