art https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/1887/all en Civilization, Civilizations, and Art at the World Bank https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/civilization-civilizations-and-art-world-bank <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div> <div> <figure class="image" style="float:left"><img alt="Eat the News, installation, table, place settings (5) collage, newspaper clippings, enamel, 2017. Courtesy of the Artist, Helen Zughaib" height="305" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/helen_zughaib_eat_the_news.jpg" title="Eat the News, installation, table, place settings (5) collage, newspaper clippings, enamel, 2017. Courtesy of the Artist" width="340" /><figcaption> Eat the News, installation, table, place settings (5)<br /> collage, newspaper clippings, enamel, 2017.<br /> Courtesy of the Artist</figcaption></figure></div> </div> <p> There is a lot of excitement regarding the new “<a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/GThNCvQtxsgJfJrxCxFJb2/civilisations-masterworks-of-beauty-and-ingenuity" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Civilizations</a>” series on the BBC. Anybody who watched the original 1969 “Civilization” series hosted by Kenneth Clark will find it hard to forget the extraordinary opening scene, in which a professorial Clark, properly attired in tweed and tie, exclaims: “What is civilization? I don’t know, I can’t define it in abstract terms, but I think I can recognize it when I see it, and I am looking at it now.” He then turns back and the camera focuses on Paris’ Notre Dame Cathedral in all its splendor.<br /><br /> The new BBC series is no longer just about European civilization as seen through its artistic achievements since the Renaissance, but expands into civilizations more broadly defined, thus the additional “s.” It is hosted by legendary art historian Simon Schama, as well as Mary Beard and David Olusoga. It covers civilizations around the world including the ancient ones of China, Egypt, and Mexico.  Like the original series, it uses art as a defining and unifying principle that not only accompanies it but more properly, defines and characterizes human civilization.<br /><br /> Why is this so? Once again, turning back to Clark, he quotes John Ruskin as saying, “Great nations write their autobiographies in three manuscripts—the book of their deeds, the book of their words, and the book of their art. Not one of these books can be understood unless we read the two others; but of the three, the only quite trustworthy one is the last.”</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 20 Mar 2018 15:58:00 +0000 Gonzalo Castro de la Mata 7784 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Quote of the week: Danny Sapani https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/quote-week-danny-sapani <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><img alt="" height="155" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/film-70637_640.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="280" />“What we want to get to is a place where we look at the human and not the colour, where we are not hampered by what we see. See within. Anyone can tell that story. It may be that there is a sort of access point that makes it easier for us to tell stories either from a western perspective or with a western face, because that is what we’re used to. What we must constantly do is change the access point, in order to create a fairer world.”</em><br /><br /> - <a href="https://dannysapani.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Danny Sapani</a>, a Ghanaian- British actor who has starred in Ultimate Force, Misfits, Hard Boiled Sweets, Singham 2 (a Tamil speaking film), Penny Dreadful, and Danny Boyle’s Trance. <br />  </p> </div></div></div> Tue, 31 May 2016 14:00:00 +0000 Sina Odugbemi 7413 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Quote of the Week: Francis Ford Coppola https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/quote-week-francis-ford-coppola <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><img alt="" height="228" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/francis_ford_coppolacannesphotocall_crop.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="180" />“You know, life is romantic.  All these things, the unity of the arts, food, and people coming together, to see a beautiful show or have a good meal, these are the joys that we are blessed with.”</em><br />  <br /> - <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Ford_Coppola" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Francis Ford Coppola</a>, an American film director, producer and screenwriter. He is most famous for his work on the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Godfather" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Godfather</a> trilogy of films.<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Mon, 02 Mar 2015 14:11:00 +0000 Sina Odugbemi 6977 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: Pão dos Pobres https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-p-o-dos-pobres <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.<br /><br /> Globally, significant progress has been achieved in elevating the position and dreams of children. United Nations data show that mortality rates of chilren under 5 years of age have <a href="https://www.childmortality.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">dropped by 49% from 1990 - 2013</a>.  Primary school enrollment in developing regions <a href="https://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/education.shtml" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">reached 90% in 2010, up from 82% in 1999</a>, which means more kids than ever are attending primary school. <a href="https://dukespace.lib.duke.edu/dspace/handle/10161/9024" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">However, it is also true </a>that youth are three times more likely than adults to be unemployed, and over 350 million young people are not engaged in education, employment, or training.<br /><br /> The lesson of the following video by <a href="https://www.paodospobres.org.br/site/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Fundação Pão Dos Pobres </a>is that reality can't stop us from dreaming.  To show that dreams are worthwhile, Pão dos Pobres created an art exhbition entitled "Por Trás Sonhos" (Behind the Dreams) featuring young people who illustrate their dreams for the future and professional artists who transform these dreams into depictions of reality.  Reality is often darker than our dreams, but that should be reason enough to work for positive change.<br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-98 asset-video"> <strong > Por Trás Sonhos </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><iframe width="854" height="510" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/vNwQ-NHRtF0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-desc field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"></div></div></div></div> </div> </div></div></div> Wed, 17 Sep 2014 16:26:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6819 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Cambridge Votes Save Artist from Apocalypse https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/cambridge-votes-save-artist-apocalypse <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Johanna/ID-100106138.jpg" style="float:left; height:272px; width:180px" />Last night I attended the launch of the <a href="https://bit.ly/campost2015" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><em>2013 Cambridge International Development Report</em></a> at Cambridge University.  The report is the work of the <a href="https://www.humanitariancentre.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Humanitarian Centre</a> – a unique network that is truly cross-sector and collaborative in its approach.<br />  <br /> So often I attend conferences and networks with homogenous attendees.  Artists network with artists, social entrepreneurs with social entrepreneurs and diplomats with diplomats.  Empathy and feel good scores high at these events, but rarely are people surprised, intrigued or challenged. The Humanitarian Centre puts poverty at its heart – and as a result attracts not just development professionals, but business leaders, academics, policy-makers, and, as it turns out – artists. <br />  <br /> To launch the report last night I was asked to take part in a “life raft” debate.   I had no idea what this was at first, but happily joined into the playful scenario.  I am an artist after all. Everyone at the event was a survivor of an apocalypse.   The year was 2015. The building we were in - <a href="https://www.newn.cam.ac.uk/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Newnham College</a> – was the last building standing on a tiny patch of land in the British Isles.  The life raft was heavily laden with food, stocks and blankets and people and was poised to sail away to a new land, where survivors would build a new society from the ground up.  Just as the raft was about to embark, six more survivors were found trapped under the rubble of a collapsed building.  You can guess what comes next.  I was one of the six and I had to argue my way onto the only remaining place on the boat.  I was not there as a communications strategist or international relations expert – instead they asked me to present my case as an artist.</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 03 Dec 2013 18:18:00 +0000 Caroline Jaine 6550 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Rwanda's Artful Path Toward Peace: Cultural Industries and Post-Conflict Reconciliation https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/rwanda-s-artful-path-toward-peace-cultural-industries-and-post-conflict-reconciliation <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=195 alt="" hspace=0 src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/5013763645_b2f157cab2_n.jpeg" width=260 align=left border=0>In my last <A href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/art-war-cultural-policies-and-post-conflict-reconstruction" target=_blank>blog</A>, I wrote about a medium that plays a critical role in post-conflict reconciliation: art.&nbsp; I argued that the cultural industries—film, music, crafts, architecture, and theater, among other art forms—provide important benefits to post-conflict societies; therefore, policies that encourage the development and growth of these industries should be a critical part of a country’s comprehensive post-conflict reconstruction plan. In a further reflection on these points, this blog examines the story of Rwanda, a post-conflict society that is using film, theater, music, and other creative industries in its journey toward reconciliation and rebuilding.</div></div></div> Tue, 17 Apr 2012 15:03:46 +0000 Uwimana Basaninyenzi 5963 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: Give a Hand to Wildlife https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-give-hand-wildlife <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><A href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target=_blank>People, Spaces, Deliberation </A>bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</P> <P><BR><IMG height=315 alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/wwf-12_1.jpg" width=497 align=bottom></P> <P></div></div></div> Wed, 11 Apr 2012 18:02:34 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 5957 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: Pass It On When You're Done With It https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-pass-it-when-youre-done-it <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p style="TEXT-ALIGN: left"><span style="FONT-SIZE: larger"><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</span></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/75HjFi4_r10" frameborder="0" width="420" height="315" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p></div></div></div> Wed, 14 Mar 2012 17:39:47 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 5922 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere The Art of War: Cultural Policies and Post-Conflict Reconstruction https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/art-war-cultural-policies-and-post-conflict-reconstruction <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=240 alt="" hspace=0 src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/art_of_war_0.jpeg" width=196 align=left border=0>Are post-conflict societies that foster, promote, and develop their cultural industries providing important reconciliation benefits to their communities? If so, should governments make cultural policy a vital part of their post-conflict reconstruction plans?</P> <P>After the traumatic experience of war, a number of policymakers may consider health, security, food, and shelter as the highest priorities without much consideration for culture. However, what many leaders in post-conflict zones often forget is that a conflicted, divided, and wounded population often compromises real prospects for peace and stability. Consequently, I argue that policies that encourage the development and growth of the cultural industries should be a critical part of post-conflict reconciliation efforts. </div></div></div> Wed, 22 Feb 2012 14:26:39 +0000 Uwimana Basaninyenzi 5908 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Watching the News on a Deck-Chair https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/watching-news-deck-chair <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=186 alt="" hspace=0 src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Johanna/scotlandyard.jpg" width=280 align=left border=0>In July I wrote a piece about <A href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/node/5746" target=_blank>Simulated Realities, Manipulated Perceptions</A>.&nbsp; In it I queried our apparent pre-occupation with the gruesomeness of war, as seen through a media lens.&nbsp; I took Pakistan as a case study for our obsession with disaster and attempted to apply a Baudrillardian theory to new coverage of terrorism in the country.&nbsp; The irony is, that this article was picked up by an editor for one of the biggest Pakistani news agencies, and ever since I have been writing a weekly column for them.</P> <P>Having spent years watching and commenting on the media, I have crossed sides, and although I remain a “blogger” not a “writer”, I feel as if I am on the periphery of the very beast I have long deplored.&nbsp; My short, but intense time at <A href="https://dawn.com/" target=_blank>Dawn</A> has been a real challenge, as I have sought to write in a way that I have advocated journalists to and continue to challenge the mainstream media perceptions from within.</div></div></div> Wed, 24 Aug 2011 17:35:20 +0000 Caroline Jaine 5801 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Arts and Minds https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/arts-and-minds <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="279" alt="" hspace="0" width="180" align="left" border="0" src="/files/publicsphere/maryproject.jpg" />My <a target="_blank" href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/putting-your-heart-it">last blog entry </a>back in July was perhaps a sign of things to come.&nbsp; In it I wrote how the &ldquo;hearts&rdquo; bit of so-called &ldquo;hearts and minds&rdquo; initiatives was often missing.&nbsp; I argued that the policy makers viewed arts and culture as a fluffy luxury and often missed their power as a key driver for change.&nbsp; I was at the time a self-critical policy-maker.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> So, after 15 years as a diplomat and communications strategist, I have given it all up and embarked on Masters of Fine Arts study in Cambridge, England.&nbsp; At first it felt indeed like a fluffy luxury, at best a mid-life crisis, but once I entered into what I can only describe as a sublime learning curve, I quickly understood that my art making can easily and effectively incorporate my passions for positive societal discourse, transforming conflict and even diplomacy.&nbsp; Furthermore my art practice can incorporate a genuinely moving participatory element.</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 30 Nov 2010 14:52:41 +0000 Caroline Jaine 5592 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere The Art of Attitudes https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/art-attitudes <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img class="" height="240" alt="Photocredit: Rami Farah, in “Not a matter of if but when,” by Julia Meltzer and David Thorne (Whitney - NYT 6/3/08) " hspace="10" width="190" align="left" vspace="10" border="0" src="/files/publicsphere/image/video190.jpeg" />Almost any newspaper is filled with stories about conflict from around the world. Even in the deepest province the reader will find a report on atrocities in Darfur or suicide bombs in Iraq.</p></div></div></div> Tue, 11 Mar 2008 23:01:25 +0000 Henriette von Kaltenborn-Stachau 5171 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere