Development https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/319/all en Five myths about governance and development https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/five-myths-about-governance-and-development <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="187" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1108798330_6c772062b5_o.jpg" style="float:right" title="" width="280" />In some areas of development policy, deep-rooted assumptions are extremely hard to dislodge. Like science-fiction androids or the many-headed Hydra, these are monsters that can sustain any number of mortal blows and still regenerate. Capable researchers armed with overwhelming evidence are no threat to them.<br />  <br /> The importance of good governance for development is one such assumption. Take last month’s enquiry report on <a href="https://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmselect/cmintdev/704/70404.htm" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Parliamentary Strengthening</a> by the International Development Committee of the UK parliament. It references the <a href="https://www.un.org/sg/management/beyond2015.shtml" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">UN High Level Panel’s</a> opinion that ‘good governance and effective institutions’ should be among the goals for ending global poverty by 2030. It would have done better to reference the evidence in 2012’s rigorously researched UN publication <a href="https://unp.un.org/Details.aspx?pid=22914" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Is Good Governance Good for Development?</a><br />  <br /> Here are five governance myths about which the strong scientific consensus might – eventually – slay some monsters.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 26 Feb 2015 15:28:00 +0000 David Booth 6976 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Quote of the Week: Diane Ackerman https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/quote-week-diane-ackerman <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><img alt="" height="231" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/dian_ackerman_2007.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="180" />“Our new age, for all its sins, is laced with invention… We have tripled our life span, reduced childhood mortality, and for most people, improved the quality of life…Our mistakes are legion, but our talent is immeasurable.”<br />  </em><br /> -<a href="https://www.dianeackerman.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Diane Ackerman</a>, a poet, essayist, and naturalist. She is the author of two dozen well-regarded works of nonfiction and poetry, including <em>The Zookeeper's Wife</em>, <em>A Natural History of the Senses, </em>and the latest <em>New York Times</em> bestseller<em>, The Human Age: The World Shaped by Us.</em><br />  </p> </div></div></div> Mon, 12 Jan 2015 15:11:00 +0000 Sina Odugbemi 6927 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere The Interview: Silvio Waisbord https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/interview-silvio-waisbord <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Exploring ideas, innovations and fresh approaches to our world is at the heart of the public sphere. <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> brings you significant voices from academia and the practice of development through a series of interviews.<br /><br /> How can the development sector be more innovative? <br /><br /> According to <a href="https://smpa.gwu.edu/silvio-r-waisbord" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Professor Silvio Waisbord</a>, an expert on global media, development, and social change, one of the critical roadblocks to overcome is the mismatch between "organizational demands" and "how change is possible." <br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-77 asset-video"> <strong > Professor Silvio Waisbord on Innovation in Development </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/45bs8i5kPns?version=3&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="//www.youtube.com/v/45bs8i5kPns?version=3&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="560" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-desc field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"></div></div></div></div> </div> </div></div></div> Thu, 22 May 2014 20:44:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6707 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-142 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right; height:139px; width:140px" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><strong><a href="https://www.slate.com/blogs/the_world_/2013/09/25/gender_and_corruption_a_study_suggests_context_determines_whether_women.html?cid=DEC_TwitterCommGAP1_P_EXT" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Are Women Really Less Corrupt Than Men?</a></strong><br /><em>Slate</em><br /><br /> “Will electing more women to office make governments less corrupt? One new paper suggests in might—but the reason for that is not necessarily encouraging.<br /><br /> Previous research has suggested an association between a politician’s gender and their likelihood to engage in corrupt behavior. A World Bank study from 2001, for instance, found that “one standard deviation increase in [female participation in government] will result in a decline in corruption... of 20 percent of a standard deviation". This perception has been behind some well-publicized campaigns, such as Mexico City’s plan to employ all-female traffic cops in some areas.”  <a href="https://www.slate.com/blogs/the_world_/2013/09/25/gender_and_corruption_a_study_suggests_context_determines_whether_women.html?cid=DEC_TwitterCommGAP1_P_EXT" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">READ MORE</a></p> </div></div></div> Thu, 14 Nov 2013 15:48:00 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6531 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-141 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right; height:139px; width:140px" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><strong><a href="https://globalvoicesonline.org/2013/11/05/women-should-be-submissive-and-other-google-autocomplete-suggestions/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">‘Women Should Be Submissive', and Other Google Autocomplete Suggestions</a></strong><br /><em>Global Voices</em><br /><br /> “A series of ads by UN Women, revealed in late October, used the Google Autocomplete feature to uncover widespread negative attitudes toward women. Global Voices followed reactions to the UN Women campaign and conducted its own experiment in different languages. The results of searches conducted both within the UN Women campaign and Global Voices revealed popular attitudes not only about women’s social and professional roles, but also about their sexuality, appearance and relationships with men.<br /><br /> The creators of the UN Women ads used search phrases like “women cannot”, “women shouldn’t”, “women should” and “women need to” completed by genuine Google search terms to highlight overwhelmingly negative stereotypes, sexist and highly discriminatory views held about women by society globally. The ads quickly went viral and sparked a heated discussion online. Last week, creators have announced that they are planning to expand the campaign in response to the mass online reaction.”  <a href="https://globalvoicesonline.org/2013/11/05/women-should-be-submissive-and-other-google-autocomplete-suggestions/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">READ MORE</a><br />  </p> </div></div></div> Thu, 07 Nov 2013 15:39:00 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6521 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-138 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right; height:139px; width:140px" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><strong><a href="https://www.itnewsafrica.com/2013/10/mobile-phones-on-the-rise-in-africa/?utm_source=dlvr.it&amp;utm_medium=twitter" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Mobile phones on the rise in Africa</a></strong><br /><em>IT News Africa</em><br /><br /> “Seven in ten Africans own their own mobile phones, with access essentially universal in Algeria and Senegal, according to Afrobarometer findings from across 34 countries.<br /><br /> The report, based on face-to-face interviews with more than 51,000 people, reveals that 84% use cell phones at least occasionally, a higher level of access than reported previously by the United Nations. Internet use is less common – with only 18% using it at least monthly.<br /><br /> These technological trends are detailed in Afrobarometer’s report, “The Partnership of Free Speech and Good Governance in Africa,” released today at the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Nairobi.”  <a href="https://www.itnewsafrica.com/2013/10/mobile-phones-on-the-rise-in-africa/?utm_source=dlvr.it&amp;utm_medium=twitter" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">READ MORE</a><br />  </p> </div></div></div> Thu, 17 Oct 2013 15:12:00 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6499 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Mobile Growth Rates by Region https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-mobile-growth-rates-region <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation </a>brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.<br /><br /> This week's Media (R)evolutions: Mobile Growth Rates by Region<br /><br /><img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/TODAY_0.png" style="float:left; height:323px; margin:0px; width:500px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />  </p> </div></div></div> Wed, 18 Sep 2013 14:00:00 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6470 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: Wilbur Goes Poor https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-wilbur-goes-poor <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world.&nbsp; These examples are meant to inspire.&nbsp;</p> <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-1 asset-video"> <strong > Wilbur Goes Poor </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><iframe width="520" height="293" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/3M4fNa_Pfl4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-desc field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"></div></div></div></div> </div> <p> <br /> </div></div></div> Wed, 08 May 2013 12:48:00 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6329 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-109 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG border=0 hspace=0 alt="" align=left src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_photo_8.jpeg" width=130 height=129></P> <P>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</P> <P><STRONG>The Washington Post<BR></STRONG><A href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/03/07/an-incredible-map-of-which-countries-email-each-other-and-why/?Post+generic=%3Ftid%3Dsm_twitter_washingtonpost" target=_blank>An incredible map of which countries e-mail each other, and why</A></P> <P>“The Internet was supposed to let us bridge continents and cultures like never before. But after analyzing more than 10 million e-mails from Yahoo! mail, a team of computer researchers noticed an interesting phenomenon: E-mails tend to flow much more frequently between countries with certain economic and cultural similarities.</P> <P>Among the factors that matter are GDP, trade, language, non-Commonwealth colonial relations, and a couple of academic-sounding cultural metrics, like power-distance, individualism, masculinity and uncertainty. (More on those later.)”&nbsp; <A href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/03/07/an-incredible-map-of-which-countries-email-each-other-and-why/?Post+generic=%3Ftid%3Dsm_twitter_washingtonpost" target=_blank>READ MORE</A></div></div></div> Thu, 14 Mar 2013 15:11:50 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6268 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: World Mobile-Cellular Subscriptions by Level of Development https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-world-mobile-cellular-subscriptions-level-development <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: <A href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target=_blank>People, Spaces, Deliberation </A>brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</P> <P><BR><IMG height=372 alt="" hspace=0 src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/slide1_15.jpg" width=500 align=middle border=0></P> <P>&nbsp;</div></div></div> Wed, 23 Jan 2013 15:42:09 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6216 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-98 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=120 alt="" hspace=0 src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_photo.jpeg" width=121 align=left border=0></P> <P>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</P> <P><STRONG>Al Jazeera <BR></STRONG><A href="https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2012/12/201212101152794146.html" target=_blank>Africa's digital election trackers</A></P> <P>“Harry Kargbo barely slept the night before Sierra Leone's recent election for president. "I was so excited," he said. “I was up until 1 AM the night before. I was thinking, 'What will happen tomorrow? What will tomorrow look like?'"</P> <P>Four hours later, Kargbo was up and out the door. Armed with nothing more than a mobile phone, he spent the next 10 hours navigating his way through a vehicle ban and police checkpoints, observing voting at polling stations around this West African country's capital, Freetown, and reporting on what he saw using the basic text messaging function on his phone."&nbsp; <A href="https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2012/12/201212101152794146.html" target=_blank>READ MORE </A></div></div></div> Thu, 13 Dec 2012 15:02:14 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6189 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: GROW https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-grow <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><A href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target=_blank>People, Spaces, Deliberation</A> bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</P> <P><IFRAME src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hkg9ADEIPXM" frameBorder=0 width=500 height=315 allowfullscreen=""></IFRAME></P> <P></div></div></div> Wed, 07 Nov 2012 15:23:29 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6151 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: I'll Take It From Here https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-ill-take-it-here <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><A href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target=_blank>People, Spaces, Deliberation </A>bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</P> <P><IFRAME src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/F-ZZeE7C7uM" frameBorder=0 width=500 height=315 allowfullscreen=""></IFRAME></P> <P></div></div></div> Wed, 24 Oct 2012 18:24:34 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6136 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-88 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=120 alt="" hspace=0 src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_photo.jpeg" width=121 align=left border=0></P> <P>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</P> <P><STRONG>TechCrunch<BR></STRONG><A href="https://techcrunch.com/2012/09/20/aakash-tablet/" target=_blank>Meet The $35 Tablet That Could Connect The World</A></P> <P>“TechCrunch just got its hands on the new Aakash UbiSlate 7Ci, the super-cheap tablet that will attempt to connect every student in India to the Internet. Educators have long hoped that cheap computing devices could bridge the global information divide, but previous attempts have been dogged by disappointing performance, lack of Internet access, and financial barriers. The latest version of India’s $35 tablet comes equipped with WiFi and has an optional upgrade ($64) of a cellular Internet package of $2/month for 2 GB of data (roughly 25 emails, 25 websites, 2 minutes of streaming video, and 15 minutes of voice chat a day). More importantly, it is expected to launch this month in India with the government’s commitment to connect even the most remote areas to the Internet. The impact of a successful rollout is difficult to overestimate: rural schools that have been connected to the Internet show immediate and tremendous gains.”&nbsp; <A href="https://techcrunch.com/2012/09/20/aakash-tablet/" target=_blank>READ MORE </A></P> <P></div></div></div> Thu, 04 Oct 2012 16:06:32 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6116 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-84 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=120 alt="" hspace=0 src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_photo.jpeg" width=121 align=left border=0></P> <P>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</P> <P><STRONG>Wired<BR></STRONG><A href="https://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2012-08/07/africa-app-store-apple" target=_blank>Africa? There's an app for that</A></P> <P>“In June this year Apple CEO Tim Cook shared with the waiting crowd at its Worldwide Development Conference that Apple would be giving access to the App Store to 32 new countries, bringing the total to 152. Tim Cook also shared some impressive statistics: the App Store now has 400 million accounts; there are 650,000 apps available for download; there have been 30 billion app downloads and more than $5 billion (£3.2 billion) has been paid to developers.</P> <P>Of those 32 new countries there are a number in Africa, ranging from countries like Chad with millions of potential app users to remote São Tomé and Príncipe, with just thousands.”&nbsp; <A href="https://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2012-08/07/africa-app-store-apple" target=_blank>READ MORE</A></div></div></div> Thu, 06 Sep 2012 15:23:06 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6090 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere