television https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/5090/all en Media (R)evolutions: Social media as a main source of news on the rise, new study finds https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-social-media-main-source-news-rise-new-study-finds <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Also available in: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/voices/fr/revolutions-mediatiques-les-reseaux-sociaux-s-imposent-de-plus-en-plus-comme-la-principale-source" rel="nofollow">Français</a> <p> <br /><strong>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: </strong><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation</strong></a><strong> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</strong><br /><br /> Where do you get your news from? Is it TV, printed media, radio, social media? Are they established or new news sources? Your answer probably differs depending on your own media consumption behaviors, your age, where you live, and many other aspects. And your answer may change from year to year. You probably still read, watch, or listen to the similar familiar and trusted sources, but has the way you get to those sources changed overtime? How do you access news? Trying to understand the changing environment around news across countries, <a href="https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism</a> commissioned the “Digital News Report.”<br /><br /> The latest <a href="https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/Digital-News-Report-2016.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Digital News Report 2016</a> found that across their entire sample, 51% of those interviewed (over 50,000 people in 26 countries) used social media as a source of news each week. For one in ten of those used social media as their main source of news. The infographic below shows clear growth of social media as a main source of news (selected countries) just from last year. According to this report, in Brazil, the growth of social media as a main source of news increased from 10% to 18%, while in Denmark it doubled from 6% to 12%. Other selected countries also experienced significant increase. In Greece, 27% said social media was their main source of news. More than TV (21%) and Print (3%).</p> <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_5.png" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="301" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_5.png" title="" width="600" /></a></div> <p> </div></div></div> Wed, 22 Mar 2017 14:43:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7667 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: World Day of Television https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-world-day-television <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div> <h4> New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</h4> <em>“I believe television is going to be the test of the modern world, and that in this new opportunity to see beyond the range of our vision, we shall discover a new and unbearable disturbance of the modern peace, or a saving radiance in the sky. We shall stand or fall by television - of that I am quite sure.” E.B. White</em><br /><br /> Television has an enormous influence on people, bringing the news and entertainment to communities all over the world. In order to recognize the impact of television, in 1996, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 21 November as <a href="https://www.un.org/en/events/televisionday/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Television Day</a>. On Monday, 21 November 2016, the United Nations TV will host an <a href="https://www.un.org/en/events/televisionday/assets/pdf/World%20TV%20Day%20Programme.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">open day</a> at its studios for talks and interactive dialogues on its programming in observance of this day.<br /><br /> In an increasingly changing global media environment, with modern Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) such as computers, Internet, mobile phones, tablets, wearables, on the rise, television continues to be a resilient communication tool. However, the television industry needs to adapt to the changing landscape in order to remain relevant. One of the most dramatic changes in this industry is the growth in the number of connected TV sets worldwide. Internet connected TVs provide interactive features, such as online browsing, video-on-demand, video streaming and social networking. With the mixture of new and old viewing habits, connected TVs are drawing larger audiences. <br /><br /> According to Digital TV Research, the number of connected TVs worldwide will reach the new high of 759 million by 2018, which is more than double of 2013 numbers (307.4 million).<br />   <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_0.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="743" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_0.jpg" title="" width="1000" /></a></div> <br /></div></div></div> Wed, 16 Nov 2016 16:55:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7563 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Mobile devices are disrupting television advertising, putting a premium on live programming https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-mobile-devices-are-disrupting-television-advertising-putting-premium-live <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</h4> <p> It’s old hat at this point to say that mobile devices are disrupting traditional media….but let’s take another look anyway. According to the <em><a href="https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/entertainment-media/outlook.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Global entertainment and media outlook 2016–2020</a></em> from PricewaterhouseCooper, the rising penetration of smartphones and tablets has rapidly led to second-screen viewing in many markets. In other words, consumers are now using multiple devices at once— perhaps watching television and playing games on a tablet during commercials. This behavior has hurt television advertising and put a premium on live programming.<br /><br /> The biggest audiences not using a second device– and therefore the biggest advertising spend – are attracted by entertainment shows with live interaction such as voting and live sporting events. Competition for advertising in these slots has been driven to new heights, as seen in the pricing of competitions like the National Football League in the United States, the English Premier League, and international events like the World Cup and the Olympics.<br /><br /><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/tv_ad_1.png" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="624" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/tv_ad_1.png" title="PwC Global entertainment and media outlook 2016-2020" width="1110" /></a></p> </div></div></div> Wed, 02 Nov 2016 14:49:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7552 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: TV is still the king of news worldwide https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-tv-still-king-news-worldwide <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</h4> For years, researchers and social critics have speculated that social media and niche interest sites were <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-time-spent-online-continues-rise" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">capturing more and more attention </a>of people, thereby supplanting traditional sources of news like radio, television, and print. Much of the concern has come from data that <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-skipping-landline-going-straight-mobile-phone" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">mobile phones are proliferating </a>around the world and that adults aged 21-34 — so-called Millennials — do not visit news sites, read print newspapers, or watch television news. Instead, this generation (and Generation Z, which follows it) spends more time on social networks, often on mobile devices. This trend can be seen worldwide, as <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-newspaper-extinction" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">newspapers have become a dying breed </a>in many countries.<br /><br /> Nevertheless, if the current media preferences of young adults are an indication of the future, the data may offer bad news for print media, but good news for TV.  According to a <a href="https://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2015/the-facts-of-life-generational-views-about-how-we-live.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Nielsen</a> global survey of more than 30,000 online consumers across 60 countries, television is still the most popular source of news for people around the world. When asked where they get the news, 53% of the respondents named television as one of their preferred sources. Click on the image below to see how each generation differs in their media use.<br />   <div> <a href="https://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2015/the-facts-of-life-generational-views-about-how-we-live.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="preferred sources of news globally" height="579" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/tvnews.jpg" title="Nielsen" width="580" /></a></div> <p>  </p> </div></div></div> Wed, 06 Apr 2016 14:39:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7360 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere How Soap Operas and Cable TV Promote Women’s Rights and Family Planning https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/how-soap-operas-and-cable-tv-promote-women-s-rights-and-family-planning <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="187" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/3492480164_02d3b21c48_o.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="280" />Taking a break from the How Change Happens book this week to head off to Harvard for a Matt Andrews/ODI seminar on ‘Doing Development Differently’ + a day at Oxfam America on Friday. Will report back, I’m sure. Meanwhile, I’ve just finished the draft chapter on the power of social norms, and how they change (and can be changed). ODI provides an absolute gold mine of a crib sheet on this in the shape of <a href="https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion-files/9184.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Drivers of Change in Gender norms: An annotated bibliography</a>, by Rachel Marcus and Ella Page with Rebecca Calder and Catriona Foley.</p> <p> Here’s one of the excerpts that caught my eye:</p> <p> Jensen, R. and Oster, E. (2007) <a href="https://bit.ly/1pJfl7R" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">‘The Power of TV: Cable Television and Women’s Status in India’</a>. Working Paper 13305. Cambridge, MA: NBER</p> </div></div></div> Wed, 29 Oct 2014 18:27:00 +0000 Duncan Green 6860 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Asia Pacific's Pay-TV Boom https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-asia-pacifics-pay-tv-boom <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.<br /><br /> When people talk about innovation in media, digital devices and social media are most likely to come to mind.  Yet, at the end of the day, we all like to watch TV.  <br /><br /> Global pay TV revenues, calculated as a total of subscription fees and on-demand movies and TV episode, will reach $209 billion in 2020, an increase from $193 billion in 2013, according to a <a href="https://www.digitaltvresearch.com/products/product?id=98" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">new report from Digital TV Research</a>.   While revenues are expected to decrease in North America by 9.2% (around $9 billion) between 2013 and 2020 and in Western Europe by 1.6%, these declines will be more than offset by revenue growth of nearly $15 billion (up by 47%) in the Asia Pacific region. Revenues will also more than double in Sub-Saharan Africa to $5 billion.<br /><br /><img alt="" height="353" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Pay%20tv%20infographic.jpg" width="500" /><br /></div></div></div> Wed, 04 Jun 2014 14:51:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6718 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Is There a Global Public Sphere? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/there-global-public-sphere <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=280 alt="" hspace=0 src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/global_public_sphere.jpeg" width=280 align=left border=0>One of the ways in which the world we live in today feels very different from the one we lived in even a decade ago is how ‘connected’ we all feel these days. It does seem that there are issues that we all talk about, personages and celebrities that we all know, and technological means of information sharing and exchange that we all share.&nbsp; Yet, can we say that one of the consequences of globalization is that we now have a global public sphere, especially now that Fareed Zakaria of CNN calls his talk show <A href="https://globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com/" target=_blank>‘The Global Public Square’?</A></P> <P>You will recall that a public sphere is a metaphor for a space that still exists in some contexts: the village square, the town hall… a place where people come together to talk about common concerns, a process that leads to the crystallization of public opinion.&nbsp; Beyond the level of the village or the small town --- situations where most inhabitants can conceivably gather and talk – the public sphere becomes a grand metaphor, but a useful one. As Denis McQuail asserts in his classic text on communication theory, in most national contests today the ‘media are now probably the key institution of the public sphere, and its “quality” will depend on the quality of the media’. [See <EM><A href="https://books.google.com/books/about/McQuail_s_Mass_Communication_Theory.html?id=CvcvLsDxhvEC" target=_blank>McQuail’s Mass Communication Theory</A></EM>, Fifth Edition, page 566.]</div></div></div> Wed, 16 Nov 2011 19:25:42 +0000 Sina Odugbemi 5855 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Control over State-Owned Media Equals Control over the State? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/control-over-state-owned-media-equals-control-over-state <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="210" alt="" hspace="0" width="280" align="left" border="0" src="/files/publicsphere/4017222193_453a199850.jpeg" />Demonstrations this week in Cote d&rsquo;Ivoire prompt a number of troubling questions, including what it means to be a &ldquo;state broadcaster&rdquo; when who heads the state is in dispute. The influence of state-run broadcasters may be diminishing across much of sub-Saharan Africa, but their potential impact on fragile democratic institutions has been highlighted this week in west Africa. Who controls the airwaves may turn out to be instrumental in who shapes public perceptions, and through them, political reality &ndash; the protestors in Cote d&rsquo;Ivoire know this, choosing of all institutions as the focus of their protest, the state-run television station.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 16 Dec 2010 19:20:59 +0000 Hannah Bowen 5604 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Long Live Television? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/long-live-television <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="210" alt="" hspace="0" width="280" align="left" border="0" src="/files/publicsphere/television%20set.jpeg" />Suppose you want to run an awareness campaign for, say, methods that prevent the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) in a sub-Saharan country. Suppose you want to reach the widest possible audience because most adults are concerned by this issue. Suppose you have a well thought-out campaign message. Which medium do you go for?</p> </div></div></div> Wed, 06 Oct 2010 14:26:39 +0000 Anne-Katrin Arnold 5549 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere