International Women&#039;s Day https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/4807/all en Blog post of the month: Six lessons I learnt while trying to reach 10 million women in India with life-saving health information https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/blog-post-month-six-lessons-i-learnt-while-trying-reach-10-million-women-india-life-saving-health <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <h4> Each month People, Spaces, Deliberation shares the blog post that generated the most interest and discussion. In March 2016, the featured blog post is "<a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/six-lessons-i-learnt-while-trying-reach-10-million-women-india-life-saving-health-information" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Six lessons I learnt while trying to reach 10 million women in India with life-saving health information</a>" by Priyanka Dutt.</h4> <p> <img alt="Kilkari mobile messaging" height="186" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/kilari1.jpg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:left" title=" BBC Media Action" width="280" />Last month, the Government of India launched a nationwide mobile health (mHealth) program designed by BBC Media Action, the BBC’s international development charity. The aim - to train 1 million community health workers and help nearly 10 million new and expecting mothers in India make healthier choices and lead longer, healthier lives.<br />  <br /><em>Mobile Academy</em> is an anytime, anywhere audio training course, delivered via mobile phone, designed to refresh the knowledge and strengthen the communication skills of community health workers. The objective is to enable the nation’s nearly one million health workers to more effectively persuade families to lead healthier lives.<br />  <br /><em>Kilkari</em>  (a baby’s gurgle) service delivers free, weekly, time-appropriate audio messages about pregnancy, childbirth, and childcare directly to the mobile phones of mothers and other family members from the second trimester of pregnancy until the child is one year old.<br /><br /> These services were originally <a href="https://www.rethink1000days.org/2013/08/lifeline-in-bihar/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">designed for use in Bihar </a>in North India, where BBC Media Action, in partnership with the state government works to improve demand for health services, improve social norms and impact health outcomes for mothers and children. <a href="https://www.rethink1000days.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Read more</a>.<br /><br /><em>Mobile Academy</em> and <em>Kilkari</em> leverage the massive penetration of mobile phones to reach the most marginalized, hardest-to-reach communities in India. These are communities where getting pregnant and having babies can be 24 times more life-threatening than giving birth in the United Kingdom!<br />  <br /> The statistics are pretty stark. Globally, every five minutes, three women die from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth, while 60 others will be left with debilitating injuries. Of these deaths, India accounts for the greatest number of women dying – over 150 every day. But we know how many of these health risks that pregnant women and their newborns face are preventable.<br /></div></div></div> Fri, 01 Apr 2016 15:52:00 +0000 BBC Media Action 7356 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Six lessons I learnt while trying to reach 10 million women in India with life-saving health information https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/six-lessons-i-learnt-while-trying-reach-10-million-women-india-life-saving-health-information <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> Priyanka Dutt shares what she has learned while implementing a mobile health program for women in India.</h4> <p> <img alt="Kilkari mobile messaging" height="186" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/kilari1.jpg" style="float:left" title=" BBC Media Action" width="280" />Last month, the Government of India launched a nationwide mobile health (mHealth) program designed by BBC Media Action, the BBC’s international development charity. The aim - to train 1 million community health workers and help nearly 10 million new and expecting mothers in India make healthier choices and lead longer, healthier lives.<br />  <br /><em>Mobile Academy</em> is an anytime, anywhere audio training course, delivered via mobile phone, designed to refresh the knowledge and strengthen the communication skills of community health workers. The objective is to enable the nation’s nearly one million health workers to more effectively persuade families to lead healthier lives.<br />  <br /><em>Kilkari</em>  (a baby’s gurgle) service delivers free, weekly, time-appropriate audio messages about pregnancy, childbirth, and childcare directly to the mobile phones of mothers and other family members from the second trimester of pregnancy until the child is one year old.<br /><br /> These services were originally <a href="https://www.rethink1000days.org/2013/08/lifeline-in-bihar/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">designed for use in Bihar </a>in North India, where BBC Media Action, in partnership with the state government works to improve demand for health services, improve social norms and impact health outcomes for mothers and children. <a href="https://www.rethink1000days.org" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Read more</a>.<br /><br /><em>Mobile Academy</em> and <em>Kilkari</em> leverage the massive penetration of mobile phones to reach the most marginalized, hardest-to-reach communities in India. These are communities where getting pregnant and having babies can be 24 times more life-threatening than giving birth in the United Kingdom!<br />  <br /> The statistics are pretty stark. Globally, every five minutes, three women die from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth, while 60 others will be left with debilitating injuries. Of these deaths, India accounts for the greatest number of women dying – over 150 every day. But we know how many of these health risks that pregnant women and their newborns face are preventable.<br /><br /></div></div></div> Tue, 08 Mar 2016 17:39:00 +0000 BBC Media Action 7332 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere The things we do: Why (some) women are less competitive than men https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/things-we-do-why-some-women-are-less-competitive-men <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="Students arriving for first classes of the day at a high-school, Casablanca" height="186" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/9126892397_87214a86ff_z.jpg" style="float:right" title=" Arne Hoel / World Bank" width="280" />Why do women tend to make less money and occupy fewer management positions than men? Do social influences affect the competitive spirits – or lack thereof – women?  Or could it be that women are simply less competitive than men?<br /><br /> With support from the National Science Foundation, <a href="https://www.nber.org/papers/w13727" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Uri Gneezy Kenneth L. Leonard, and John A. List, set out to test assumptions</a> about biologically based competitiveness in two of the most culturally different places on the planet: the ultra-patriarchal Masai tribe of Tanzania and the matrilineal Khasi people of northeast India.  The researchers conducted experiments in both environments to see what they could unearth regarding the competitive spirit of women across extremely different societies that held women in diametrically opposite roles.  </p> </div></div></div> Tue, 08 Mar 2016 17:37:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7331 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere #3 from 2014: Were You Celebrated on International Men’s Day? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/3-2014-were-you-celebrated-international-men-s-day <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><em><strong>Our Top Ten blog posts by readership in 2014. </strong><br /> This post was originally posted on December 02, 2014</em><br />   <p> <img alt="" height="186" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/9126505789_d5db344721_o.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="280" />I am pretty sure that most readers of this reflection were not aware that on November 19, we were supposed to observe <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Men%27s_Day" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">International Men’s Day</a> (IMD). I am also pretty confident that in most cases the slim majority (50.4%) of the global population wasn’t celebrated either. If my assumption is incorrect, please let me know, as it would make my day to learn otherwise.<br />  <br /> IMD was inaugurated on November 19, 1999 in Trinidad and Tobago, although calls for this civil awareness day can be traced to the 1960’s. The objectives of celebrating an IMD include focusing on men’s and boy’s health, improving gender relations, promoting gender equality, furnishing opportunities for gender balance, and highlighting positive role models. IMD is observed in almost 60 countries and is not intended to compete with International Women’s Day (IWD). The theme for the 2014 IMD was “Working Together for Men and Boys.”</p> <p> It might be seen as an idea whose time has come. After all, men are proclaimed as endangered. We’re dying younger and living in poorer health than women. Men are more likely to be in prison and less likely to be in college than their female peers. Boys commit suicide more often than girls.  </div></div></div> Wed, 07 Jan 2015 18:18:00 +0000 Leszek J. Sibilski 6924 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Were You Celebrated on International Men’s Day? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/were-you-celebrated-international-men-s-day <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="186" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/9126505789_d5db344721_o.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="280" />I am pretty sure that most readers of this reflection were not aware that on November 19, we were supposed to observe <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Men%27s_Day" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">International Men’s Day</a> (IMD). I am also pretty confident that in most cases the slim majority (50.4%) of the global population wasn’t celebrated either. If my assumption is incorrect, please let me know, as it would make my day to learn otherwise.<br />  <br /> IMD was inaugurated on November 19, 1999 in Trinidad and Tobago, although calls for this civil awareness day can be traced to the 1960’s. The objectives of celebrating an IMD include focusing on men’s and boy’s health, improving gender relations, promoting gender equality, furnishing opportunities for gender balance, and highlighting positive role models. IMD is observed in almost 60 countries and is not intended to compete with International Women’s Day (IWD). The theme for the 2014 IMD was “Working Together for Men and Boys.”</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 02 Dec 2014 17:27:00 +0000 Leszek J. Sibilski 6889 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Are Global Gender Norms Shifting? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/are-global-gender-norms-shifting <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=198 alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Johanna/norms-cover.png" width=280 align=left>I’ve been thinking a bit about norms recently – how do the unwritten rules that guide so much of our behaviour and understanding of what is acceptable/right/normal etc evolve over time? Because they undoubtedly do – look at attitudes to slavery, women’s votes, racial equality or more recently child rights.</P> <P>So in advance of <A href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Women's_Day" target=_blank onclick="javascript:pageTracker._trackPageview('/outgoing/en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Women');">International Women’s Day</A>, I ploughed my way through a really important new World Bank study, <A href="https://siteresources.worldbank.org/EXTSOCIALDEVELOPMENT/Resources/244362-1164107274725/On-Norms-Agency-Book.pdf" target=_blank onclick="javascript:pageTracker._trackPageview('/outgoing/siteresources.worldbank.org/EXTSOCIALDEVELOPMENT/Resources/244362-1164107274725/On-Norms-Agency-Book.pdf');">On Norms and Agency: Conversations about Gender Equality with Women and Men in 20 Countries</A>. Like the Bank’s path-breaking <A href="https://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTPOVERTY/0,,contentMDK:20622514~menuPK:336998~pagePK:148956~piPK:216618~theSitePK:336992,00.html" target=_blank onclick="javascript:pageTracker._trackPageview('/outgoing/web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTPOVERTY/0,,contentMDK:20622514~menuPK:336998~pagePK:148956~piPK:216618~theSitePK:336992,00.html');">Voices of the Poor</A> or the more recent <A href="https://www.oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/?p=13492" target=_blank>Time to Listen</A>, it’s an attempt to take the global temperature on a big topic through a process of rigorous and deep listening involving 4000 women and men around the developing world.</P> <P>Such studies are lengthy, complex and expensive, but are incredibly revealing and useful, especially as they start to accumulate. We’re trying a mini version with the <A href="https://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/our-work/food-livelihoods/food-price-volatility-research" target=_blank onclick="javascript:pageTracker._trackPageview('/outgoing/policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/our-work/food-livelihoods/food-price-volatility-research');">Life in a time of Food Price Volatility</A> listening project – first year results out soon.</P> <P>The report is 150 pages and pretty heavy going – subtle, nuanced and complex, and very hard to extract easy headlines. A close reading will yield much more than a skim, but for the time-poor blog reader, here are some of the findings that jumped out at me.</div></div></div> Fri, 08 Mar 2013 17:23:21 +0000 Duncan Green 6263 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-108 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG border=0 hspace=0 alt="" align=left src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_photo_8.jpeg" width=130 height=129></P> <P>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week</P> <P><STRONG>Biz Community<BR></STRONG><A href="https://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/410/22/90253.html" target=_blank>How to speed up change for women in the workplace</A></P> <P>“The theme of International Women's Day 2013, on 8 March, is "The Gender Agenda: Gaining Momentum". There are many signs of this momentum in Africa - from female entrepreneurship, which is driving growth in the region, to the fact there are female government ministers or heads of state in South Africa, Ghana, Liberia, Malawi and Rwanda.</P> <P>In fact, Rwanda, with 56% of seats in its House of Deputies held by women, is currently the only government in the world dominated by women, putting the East African country well ahead of the United States, United Kingdom and Japan, which all fall below the 25% mark.</P> <P>So, there is momentum, but not enough of it. For instance, the global downturn appears to have worsened gender gaps in employment, according to the International Labour Organisation.”&nbsp; <A href="https://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/410/22/90253.html" target=_blank>READ MORE</A></div></div></div> Thu, 07 Mar 2013 15:22:40 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6260 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-58 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=120 alt="" hspace=0 src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/medium_weekly_wire_photo_3.jpeg" width=120 align=left border=0>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</P> <P><STRONG>CIPE Global<BR></STRONG><A href="https://www.cipe.org/blog/?p=10754" target=_blank>20 Empowered Women that You Should Be Following on Twitter</A></P> <P>“Men are from Mars, women are from Venus – we’ve all heard that before.&nbsp; It’s no secret that the men and women are treated differently, but when it comes down to the heart of the matter, women are just as capable of success, if not more so, than their galactic counterparts.</P> <P>With International Women’s Day fast approaching, CIPE is highlighting ways to help the movement for women’s empowerment. CIPE’s programs approach women’s empowerment through institutional reform, economic and political empowerment, and working with partner organizations to look beyond financial assistance – by helping women build leadership and business skills, CIPE focuses on preparing women for participation, whether they’re running a business, advocating legislative reforms, or simply making the world a better place for taking care of their families.” <A href="https://www.cipe.org/blog/?p=10754" target=_blank>READ MORE</A></div></div></div> Thu, 08 Mar 2012 16:01:29 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 5918 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere “Women Make the News” https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/women-make-news <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="210" alt="" hspace="0" width="280" align="left" border="0" src="/files/publicsphere/Johanna/3311865870_d8d58258f4.jpeg" />This month, thousands of events are taking place around the world to celebrate women and their economic, political and social accomplishments.&nbsp; Also, this year is extra special since it marks the 100th anniversary of the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.internationalwomensday.com/pressrelease.asp">International Women&rsquo;s Day</a>.&nbsp; In 1911, more than a million people took to the streets in several countries to campaign for women&rsquo;s rights, including the right to vote.&nbsp; Today, the International Women&rsquo;s Day, March 8, is an official holiday in many countries, and the celebration extends throughout the month in many places.&nbsp; Just a few years ago, for example, the U.S. declared the month of March Women&rsquo;s History month.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 17 Mar 2011 18:03:35 +0000 Johanna Martinsson 5683 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere