Media (R)evolutions https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/12093/all en Media (R)evolutions: What’s the potential of mobile payments? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-what-s-potential-mobile-payments <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><strong>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape:</strong> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" rel="nofollow"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation</strong></a> <strong>brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</strong> <br /><br /> There is a lot of discussion right now about mobile payments and its potential in rural and urban communities. Who uses these services and how will this impact various key markets?<br /><br /> According to the latest <a href="https://blog.globalwebindex.net/chart-of-the-day/7-in-10-mobile-payment-users-live-in-urban-environments/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Mobile Payments report</a> by the <a href="https://www.globalwebindex.net/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">GlobalWebIndex</a>, the next wave of growth in mobile payments will be in rural areas. Defined as the financial transactions performed via mobile devices, mobile payments may offer solutions to traditional methods of delivering financial services. Currently 7 in 10 mobile payment users live in urban environments.<br />   <div> <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/mobile_payments.png" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="462" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/mobile_payments.png" title="By Global Web Index" width="350" /></a></div> <br /><span>Globally, there are about 2 billion adults without access to a basic bank account. Although this is a 20 percent decrease from </span><a href="https://www.worldbank.org/en/programs/globalfindex" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><span>2.5 billion adults in 2011</span></a><span>, it’s still a high number. Regardless of barriers of opening a bank account (lack of enough money, distance to the nearest financial service provider, lack of proper documentation papers, etc..), one thing is clear: traditional financial services are not meeting the needs of the low income users. Will mobile payments fill this gap? </span></div> </div></div></div> Wed, 14 Jun 2017 18:02:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7740 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: How users purchase goods online differs by country https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-how-users-purchase-goods-online-differs-country <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><strong>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape:</strong> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" rel="nofollow"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation</strong></a> <strong>brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's. </strong><br /><br /><a href="https://unctad.org/en/pages/newsdetails.aspx?OriginalVersionID=1465" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The 2017 CIGI-Ipsos Global Survey on Internet Security and Trust</a> conducted by Ipsos (global research company), on behalf of the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the Internet Society reveals interesting findings on Internet security, user trust, and e-commerce behaviors.<br /><br /> The survey found stark differences between countries in terms of how users purchase goods online. While in China, India and Indonesia more than 86% of respondents expect to make mobile payments on their smartphone in the next year, only 30% in France, Germany and Japan expected to do so. The chart below shows the percentage of respondents likely to use mobile payments on their smartphone in the next year.<br />   <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/by_ipsos_2_0.png" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="360" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/by_ipsos_2_0.png" title="" width="640" /></a></div> <p> Source: Ipsos<br /><br /> Most G-8 countries mark near the bottom of this list, while emerging economies are near the top, with Indonesia leading at 55%. <br /><br /> The survey also found that among those surveyed 49% said that lack of trust is the main reason they don’t shop online, suggesting that Internet users are increasingly concerned about their online privacy.</p> </div></div></div> Wed, 31 May 2017 15:52:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7731 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Virtual Reality – a future business model for newsrooms? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-virtual-reality-future-business-model-newsrooms <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><strong>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape:</strong> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" rel="nofollow"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation</strong></a> <strong>brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</strong><br />   <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/virtual_reality.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="215" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/virtual_reality.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="300" /></a>Virtual reality (VR) in journalism is still in its early years of development. However, it has enormous potential to transform the way news content is made and consumed. Offering a new narrative form, VR has become increasingly popular in newsrooms. Is this the way of the future? Is virtual reality a feasible way to present news? Is this a lucrative stream of revenue for newsrooms?<br /><br /> VR is “<a href="https://towcenter.gitbooks.io/virtual-reality-journalism/content/introduction/what_is_vr.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">an immersive media experience that replicates either a real or imagined environment and allows users to interact with this world in ways that feel as if they are there</a>.” Immersive storytelling may come in a few forms such as “<a href="https://kf-site-production.s3.amazonaws.com/publications/pdfs/000/000/182/original/VR_report_web.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">virtual reality,” “augmented reality” and “spherical/360-degree video.”</a>  While early experimentation of VR in media focused on documentaries, by 2017 there is a larger variety of VR news content expanding to short features, foreign correspondence, political news coverage and others.<br /><br /> According to the recent <a href="https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/VR%20for%20news%20-%20the%20new%20reality.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">report</a> from the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, further success of VR in journalism is highly dependent not only on good/diverse content, but also on the adaptation of VR headsets by consumers to fully immerse themselves in the virtual reality experience. While the experimentation of virtual reality storytelling has been on the rise, the adaptation of VR headsets by consumers is still low. It is <a href="https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/VR%20for%20news%20-%20the%20new%20reality.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">estimated that total high-end headset sales are around 2 million worldwide.</a> Others predict that <a href="https://kf-site-production.s3.amazonaws.com/publications/pdfs/000/000/182/original/VR_report_web.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">by 2020 up to 34 million headsets will be sold, with virtual reality market reaching $150 billion in sales</a>. </div> </div></div></div> Wed, 17 May 2017 18:10:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7721 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Is the Internet increasing labor market polarization in Europe and Central Asia? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-internet-increasing-labor-market-polarization-europe-and-central-asia <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <strong>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: </strong><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation</strong></a><strong> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</strong><br /><br /><img alt="" height="301" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/eca_1.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="228" />According to the World Bank report <a href="https://www.worldbank.org/en/region/eca/publication/digital-dividends-in-eca" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">“Reaping Digital Dividends: Leveraging the Internet for Development in Europe and Central Asia</a>” Europe and Central Asia (ECA) region has experienced, on average, a larger decline in routine employment than other parts of the world, coupled with an increase in high-and low-skill occupations. With anxiety about the job replacement effects of information and communication technologies (ICT) on the rise, let’s look into some of the highlights of the report focusing on possible short term disruptions and long term opportunities brought by ICT.  <br /><br /> Is the Internet responsible for the increasing market polarization? According to this report, it is not. The authors argue that in addition to technologies associated with the Internet that may have helped this process, there are other aspects, such as structural changes in economies, technological and trade, as well as labor market liberalization that help explain such rapid labor market polarization. In addition, the report points out that the depth of Internet adaptation by individuals and firms tends to be lower in ECA than many other regions.<br /><br /> At the same time, the report found that countries that implemented reforms in the telecommunications sector, with an objective to improve competition, increase provision, and lower prices, created the enabling environment for the increase in Internet adaptation. The graph below demonstrates, that the introduction of the telecommunications reform is strongly correlated with the decrease in the routine labor employment share.</p> </div></div></div> Wed, 05 Apr 2017 15:42:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7682 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Social media as a main source of news on the rise, new study finds https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-social-media-main-source-news-rise-new-study-finds <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Also available in: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/voices/fr/revolutions-mediatiques-les-reseaux-sociaux-s-imposent-de-plus-en-plus-comme-la-principale-source" rel="nofollow">Français</a> <p> <br /><strong>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: </strong><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation</strong></a><strong> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</strong><br /><br /> Where do you get your news from? Is it TV, printed media, radio, social media? Are they established or new news sources? Your answer probably differs depending on your own media consumption behaviors, your age, where you live, and many other aspects. And your answer may change from year to year. You probably still read, watch, or listen to the similar familiar and trusted sources, but has the way you get to those sources changed overtime? How do you access news? Trying to understand the changing environment around news across countries, <a href="https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism</a> commissioned the “Digital News Report.”<br /><br /> The latest <a href="https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/Digital-News-Report-2016.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Digital News Report 2016</a> found that across their entire sample, 51% of those interviewed (over 50,000 people in 26 countries) used social media as a source of news each week. For one in ten of those used social media as their main source of news. The infographic below shows clear growth of social media as a main source of news (selected countries) just from last year. According to this report, in Brazil, the growth of social media as a main source of news increased from 10% to 18%, while in Denmark it doubled from 6% to 12%. Other selected countries also experienced significant increase. In Greece, 27% said social media was their main source of news. More than TV (21%) and Print (3%).</p> <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_5.png" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="301" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_5.png" title="" width="600" /></a></div> <p> </div></div></div> Wed, 22 Mar 2017 14:43:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7667 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Media use in the Middle East https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-media-use-middle-east <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Also available in:  <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/voices/fr/revolutions-mediatiques-panorama-des-usages-des-medias-au-moyen-orient" rel="nofollow">Français</a>, <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/voices/ar/publicsphere/media-revolutions-media-use-middle-east-difference" rel="nofollow">العربية</a> <br /><br /><strong>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: </strong><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation</strong></a><strong> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</strong><br />   <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/9126507653_9237f39c83_k.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="200" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/9126507653_9237f39c83_k.jpg" style="float:right" title="Arne Hoel / World Bank" width="300" /></a></div> <a href="https://www.qatar.northwestern.edu/docs/publications/research-media-use/2016-middle-east-media-use-report.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Digital divides are narrowing between generations and social classes within countries in the Middle East</a>, according to a report published by the Northwestern University in Qatar in partnership with Doha Film Institute. This six-nation (Egypt, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates) survey provides a comprehensive overview of media use in the region. Here are some of the findings of the report: <ul><li> <strong>“Cultural attitudes</strong> <ul><li> A majority of nationals in all six countries want more entertainment media based on their culture and history, ranging from 52% of Tunisians to 80% of Qataris.</li> <li> Use of entertainment media in Arabic is widespread, but use of English is much lower and—in some countries—declining. Only about four in 10 nationals watch films or access the internet in English. Majorities of nationals consume entertainment content from Arab countries, while consumption of film, TV, and music from the U.S. decreased since 2014.</li> </ul></li> <li> <strong>Censorship and regulations</strong> <ul><li> Three in 10 internet users worry about governments checking their online activity, a slight decline from 2013 and 2015.</li> <li> A majority of nationals supports the freedom to express ideas online even if they are unpopular (54%).</li> </ul></li> <li> <strong>Online &amp; Social Media</strong> <ul><li> About eight in 10 national internet users in the region use Facebook and WhatsApp, the dominant social media platforms.</li> <li> From 2013 to 2016, internet penetration rose in all six countries surveyed, but most dramatically in Egypt, as well as Lebanon.</li> <li> Nearly all nationals in Arab Gulf countries use the internet.</li> </ul></li> </ul><p> </div></div></div> Wed, 08 Mar 2017 19:30:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7654 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: the changing face of radio https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-changing-face-radio <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><strong>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: </strong><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation</strong></a><strong> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</strong><br /><br /> The significance of radio cannot be underestimated. Radio is an important, or sometimes the only, source of information to many around the world who are still unconnected to the Internet. According to the <a href="https://www.itu.int/en/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">International Telecommunication Union</a> (ITU) that number is about 3.9 billion. “<a href="https://itu4u.wordpress.com/2017/02/13/world-radio-day-the-changing-face-of-radio/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">While 40% of the population in developing world is online, at least 75% of households in developing countries have access to a radio.” </a> In that sense, radio is fundamentally more inclusive communication tool.<br /><br /> But as the world moves forward with new technologies and modern communication platforms, the face of radio remains mostly unchanged. Can radio afford to stay this way? How can radio adapt to the 21<sup>st</sup> century changes? How can it reach and interact with its listeners in the time of snapchat, twitter and other social media channels? Can it leverage these technological changes and turn them into opportunities? If the radio stations want to remain relevant and continue to reach populations worldwide, they need to pay attention to the changing media consumer behaviors, produce the right content, and get it to the consumers in an easy, simple way across all the devices.<br /><br /> Tune in to an ITU special report for the <a href="https://www.diamundialradio.org/home" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Radio Day</a> to learn more about the future of radio.<br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-332 asset-video"> <strong > Tune in to the Future of Radio - An ITU Special Report </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="640" height="360" data="//www.youtube.com/v/udlAdD2TTrw"> <param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/udlAdD2TTrw" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> </object> </div></div></div></div> </div></div></div></div> Wed, 22 Feb 2017 14:00:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7641 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Gen X spends more time online than Gen Y https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-gen-x-spends-more-time-online-gen-y <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><span><strong>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: </strong></span><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><span><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation</strong></span></a><span><strong> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</strong></span><br /><br /> Let’s face it, it’s been a while, a <em>long</em> while, since we’ve all seen a 20-something who isn’t glued to their smartphone. This has been such a common sight everywhere now that we instantly picture a millennial with their cell phone, most likely checking their social media for updates.<br /><br /> So with that in mind, I can almost certainly say that you’ll be surprised to learn that it’s actually the previous generation, <a href="https://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/2016-nielsen-social-media-report.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Gen X who use social media</a> more copiously than their successors, Gen Y or millennials.<br />   <div> <div> <a href="https://www.fipp.com/news/insightnews/genx-spends-more-time-social-media-than-millennials" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="356" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/gen_x_spends_more_time_online_than_gen_y_0.jpg" title="" width="500" /></a></div> </div> <p> <br /><br /> A week has 168 total hours out of which Gen Y spent 26 hours and 49 minutes on media, which is about 5 hours <strong><em>less </em></strong>than Gen X. In fact, out of the total weekly amount of time spent online, those between the ages of 35-49 spent more time on social media than their predecessors.<br /><br /> Are you surprised by this fact? Why do you think Gen X spends more time on social media than the millennials? Leave us a comment below &amp; share your opinion.</p> <p> <a href="https://twitter.com/PublicSphereWB" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Follow PublicSphereWB on Twitter</a><span>!</span></div></div></div> Wed, 08 Feb 2017 14:30:00 +0000 Sangeetha Shanmugham 7630 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: What’s the future of the sharing economy? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-what-s-future-sharing-economy <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><strong><span>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: </span><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><span>People, Spaces, Deliberation</span></a><span> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</span></strong><br /><br /><span>Globally, more and more people are embracing the sharing or platform economy. Some estimate that </span><a href="https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/strategy-and-corporate-finance/our-insights/how-the-sharing-economy-can-make-its-case" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><span>the sector’s revenues will increase to $335 billion globally by 2025.</span></a><span> According to the<span> </span></span><a href="https://reports.weforum.org/future-of-jobs-2016/drivers-of-change/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><span>Future Jobs Survey, conducted by the World Economic Forum</span></a><span>, among top technological drivers of industrial change by 2020, the sharing economy, crowdsourcing takes the fifth place, with mobile internet, cloud technology taking the lead.</span><br />   <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_2.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="325" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_2.jpg" title="" width="500" /></a></div> <p> <br /> So what will the impact of these drivers be on the industries? Will there be new industries born as a result of these transformations? If so, will we be able and ready to respond to those changes? Will we have necessary skill sets to compete in the work force? Future holds both opportunities and challenges for industries, corporations, governments, and others concerned with the technological advancements.<br />  <br /> What exactly is the sharing economy? Are you using some of its platforms? Do you benefit from their services? </p> </div></div></div> Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:05:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7614 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Trends in information and communication technologies https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-trends-information-and-communication-technologies <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> <span>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: </span><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><span>People, Spaces, Deliberation</span></a><span> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's. </span></h4> Every year the <a href="https://www.itu.int/en/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">International Telecommunication Union</a> (ITU) publishes <a href="https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/Documents/publications/misr2016/MISR2016-w4.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Measuring the Information Society Report</a> that looks at the latest developments in information and communication technologies (ICTs).<br /><br /> Here are some of the latest ICT trends according to ITU.  <br /><br /><a href="https://www.itu.int/en/mediacentre/Pages/2016-PR53.aspx" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Regional comparisons:</a> <ul><li> Europe continues to lead the way in ICT development;</li> <li> A number of countries in the Americas significantly improved their performance in the ICT Development Index (IDI);</li> <li> The Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) region is the most homogeneous in terms of ICT development;</li> <li> The Asia-Pacific region is, by contrast, the most heterogeneous;</li> <li> There is great diversity in ICT development across the Arab States;</li> <li> Africa is working on pushing up its IDI performance.</li> </ul><a href="https://www.itu.int/en/mediacentre/Pages/2016-PR53.aspx" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Internet potential underused:</a> <ul><li> Many people have access to Internet, but many do not actually use them;</li> <li> The full potential of the Internet remains untapped;</li> <li> Many people still do not own or use a mobile phone;</li> <li> Progress in Least Developed Countries (LDCs) – mobile-cellular prices continued to decrease in 2015, and the price drop was steeper than in previous years;</li> <li> Affordability is the main barrier to mobile-phone ownership;</li> <li> Fixed-broadband prices continued to drop significantly in 2015 but remain high – and clearly unaffordable in a number of LDCs.</li> </ul> The issue of <strong>affordability</strong> of various ICT services needs to be at the forefront of the development agenda in order to decrease the <a href="https://cs.stanford.edu/people/eroberts/cs181/projects/digital-divide/start.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">digital divide</a>. Despite the fact that the overall mobile-cellular prices, as well as fixed-broadband and mobile-broadband prices have dropped in recent years, <a href="https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/Documents/publications/misr2016/MISR2016-w4.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">affordability of ICT services is still one of the key barriers to ICT uptake</a>.  The role of ICTs is crucial in ending poverty, providing millions with <a href="https://www.itu.int/en/sustainable-world/Pages/goal4.aspx" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">access</a> to a wealth of educational resources, and supporting the <a href="https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Sustainable Development Goals.</a><br /><br /> The recent <a href="https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/Documents/publications/misr2016/MISR2016-w4.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">report</a> also finds that the <strong>gender gap</strong> is prominent in many aspects of technology. For example, “<a href="https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/Documents/publications/misr2016/MISR2016-w4.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">data on mobile-phone usage by gender shows that the percentage of male users is higher than that of female users in most countries, although differences are small in most economies</a>.” However, in some countries gender gap is significant in the mobile-phone ownership. For example, in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan, men are twice as likely as women to own a mobile phone.<br />   <div> <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_11_2017.png" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="420" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_11_2017.png" title="by ITU " width="500" /></a></div> </div> <p> </div></div></div> Wed, 11 Jan 2017 15:24:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7606 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere #6 from 2016: Media (R)evolutions: Time spent online continues to rise https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/6-2016-media-revolutions-time-spent-online-continues-rise <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div> <em><strong>Our Top Ten blog posts by readership in 2016. </strong>This post was <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-time-spent-online-continues-rise" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">originally published </a>on February 10, 2016.  </em><br />  </div> <h4> <strong>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</strong></h4> <span>Roughly how many hours do you spend online each day? How many hours do you spend on social media? If you’re like most people, you’re are spending more and more time online, and you’re spending much of that time on social media networks. </span><br /><br /><span>Each year, </span><a href="https://wearesocial.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">We Are Social </a><span>collates key data from multiple sources to make sense of the digital and social trends affecting media and technology. </span><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/wearesocialsg/digital-in-2016" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Digital in 2016</a><span> is the latest report, and the following graphs illustrate data the organization obtained from the </span><a href="https://www.globalwebindex.net/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Global Web Index</a><span>. GWI conducts annual interviews with 200,000 internet users across 33 markets in quarterly waves, each of which has a global sample size of 45,000 – 50,000 internet users.</span><br /><span> </span><br /><span>Amongst the 30 economies surveyed, </span><span>Filipinos and Brazilians spend the most time using the internet, clocking an impressive 5.2 hours per day on average. Together with Thais, Brazilians also top the list for the amount of time spent using mobile internet, logging an average of 3.9 hours per day on their devices.  Contrary to what you might expect, the Japanese and South Koreans spend the least amount of time on the internet each day, logging only 2.9 and 3.1 hours respectively. This matches previous years in which these countries have been at the bottom of the spectrum.</span> <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1a.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="720" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1a.jpg" title="Time spent the internet by We Are Social" width="959" /></a></div> </div></div></div> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 20:06:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7598 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Social media and communication tools under assault? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-social-media-and-communication-tools-under-assault <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> <span>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: </span><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><span>People, Spaces, Deliberation</span></a><span> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</span></h4> According to the latest “<a href="https://freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-net/freedom-net-2016" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Freedom on the Net </a>” report “In a new trend, governments increasingly target messaging and voice communication apps such as <a href="https://www.whatsapp.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">WhatsApp</a> and <a href="https://telegram.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Telegram</a>.” Annual report of the <a href="https://freedomhouse.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Freedom House</a>, it tracks improvements and declines in governments’ policies and practices. This year the report covered 65 countries.  <br /><br /> While <a href="https://www.facebook.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Twitter</a> have long been targeted by governments, silencing messaging apps is somewhat new.<br /><br /> Messaging apps have become an integral part of peoples’ lives, enabling millions of them to communicate with their friends and family much easier, faster, and cheaper. If messaging apps are so helpful in connecting people, why do governments target them so much? One of the main reasons is <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/17/technology/personaltech/encryption-privacy.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">encryption</a>! In addition to low, or often no cost associated with them, messaging apps also offer a sense of security not often available in other modes of communication. Many messaging apps, like WhatsApp, use encryption. Encryption ensures that messages are secured and encrypted, making it harder, if not impossible, for governments, to monitor content.<br />   <div> <img alt="" height="613" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/fotn_2016_social_media_accounts_blocked-white-background_820px.jpg" title="Image by Freedom House" width="820" /></div> <p> <span>Source: <a href="https://freedomhouse.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Freedom House</a></span></p> </div></div></div> Wed, 14 Dec 2016 15:33:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7589 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: The world of messaging apps https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-world-messaging-apps <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> <span>New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: </span><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><span>People, Spaces, Deliberation</span></a><span> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</span></h4> The number of people using messaging apps continues to rise. In fact, traditional global telecoms are scrambling to compete and maintain relevance. In some parts of the world messaging apps have become the most used apps overall.<br /><br /> According to data (using Android App Data: April 2016) from <a href="https://www.similarweb.com/blog/worldwide-messaging-apps" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Similar Web </a>out of 187 countries examined, <a href="https://www.whatsapp.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">WhatsApp</a> was the most popular messaging app, becoming the global leader by claiming the top spot in 109 countries. <a href="https://www.globalwebindex.net/blog/3-in-4-whatsappers-use-the-service-daily" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Findings</a> from <a href="https://www.globalwebindex.net/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Global Web Index</a> (GWI) suggest that 3 in 4 WhatsApp users use the service daily, helping this messaging app claim the title for the highest usage frequency of all the messaging apps tracked by GWI. Although Facebook <a href="https://www.messenger.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Messenger</a> came in second place, <a href="https://www.similarweb.com/blog/worldwide-messaging-apps" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">claiming 49 countries</a>, it remains to be one of the most powerful <a href="https://www.naspers.com/ventures/news/messaging-apps-king-makers-in-the-emerging-world" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">platforms</a> for companies to reach their customers. Third in line was <a href="https://www.viber.com/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Viber</a>, with 10 countries. <a href="https://line.me/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">LINE</a> messaging app took fourth place.<br />   <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/by_similarweb.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="614" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/by_similarweb.jpg" title="Data by SimilarWeb" width="483" /></a></div> <p> <span>Source: </span><a href="https://www.similarweb.com/blog/worldwide-messaging-apps" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><span>SimilarWeb</span></a><span> </span><br />  </p> </div></div></div> Wed, 30 Nov 2016 16:00:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7574 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: World Day of Television https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-world-day-television <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div> <h4> New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</h4> <em>“I believe television is going to be the test of the modern world, and that in this new opportunity to see beyond the range of our vision, we shall discover a new and unbearable disturbance of the modern peace, or a saving radiance in the sky. We shall stand or fall by television - of that I am quite sure.” E.B. White</em><br /><br /> Television has an enormous influence on people, bringing the news and entertainment to communities all over the world. In order to recognize the impact of television, in 1996, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 21 November as <a href="https://www.un.org/en/events/televisionday/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Television Day</a>. On Monday, 21 November 2016, the United Nations TV will host an <a href="https://www.un.org/en/events/televisionday/assets/pdf/World%20TV%20Day%20Programme.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">open day</a> at its studios for talks and interactive dialogues on its programming in observance of this day.<br /><br /> In an increasingly changing global media environment, with modern Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) such as computers, Internet, mobile phones, tablets, wearables, on the rise, television continues to be a resilient communication tool. However, the television industry needs to adapt to the changing landscape in order to remain relevant. One of the most dramatic changes in this industry is the growth in the number of connected TV sets worldwide. Internet connected TVs provide interactive features, such as online browsing, video-on-demand, video streaming and social networking. With the mixture of new and old viewing habits, connected TVs are drawing larger audiences. <br /><br /> According to Digital TV Research, the number of connected TVs worldwide will reach the new high of 759 million by 2018, which is more than double of 2013 numbers (307.4 million).<br />   <div> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_0.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="743" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_0.jpg" title="" width="1000" /></a></div> <br /></div></div></div> Wed, 16 Nov 2016 16:55:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7563 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: Mobile devices are disrupting television advertising, putting a premium on live programming https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-mobile-devices-are-disrupting-television-advertising-putting-premium-live <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</h4> <p> It’s old hat at this point to say that mobile devices are disrupting traditional media….but let’s take another look anyway. According to the <em><a href="https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/entertainment-media/outlook.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Global entertainment and media outlook 2016–2020</a></em> from PricewaterhouseCooper, the rising penetration of smartphones and tablets has rapidly led to second-screen viewing in many markets. In other words, consumers are now using multiple devices at once— perhaps watching television and playing games on a tablet during commercials. This behavior has hurt television advertising and put a premium on live programming.<br /><br /> The biggest audiences not using a second device– and therefore the biggest advertising spend – are attracted by entertainment shows with live interaction such as voting and live sporting events. Competition for advertising in these slots has been driven to new heights, as seen in the pricing of competitions like the National Football League in the United States, the English Premier League, and international events like the World Cup and the Olympics.<br /><br /><a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/tv_ad_1.png" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="624" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/tv_ad_1.png" title="PwC Global entertainment and media outlook 2016-2020" width="1110" /></a></p> </div></div></div> Wed, 02 Nov 2016 14:49:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7552 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere