safety https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/1462/all en Weekly wire: The global forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-319 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="180" /></a><strong>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br /><br /><strong><a href="https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/28482" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Global Financial Development Report 2017/2018: Bankers without Borders</a><br /> World Bank</strong><br /> Successful international integration has underpinned most experiences of rapid growth, shared prosperity, and reduced poverty. Perhaps no sector of the economy better illustrates the potential benefits--but also the perils--of deeper integration than banking. International banking may contribute to faster growth in two important ways: first, by making available much needed capital, expertise, and new technologies; and second, by enabling risk-sharing and diversification.  But international banking is not without risks. The global financial crisis vividly demonstrated how international banks can transmit shocks across the globe. The Global Financial Development Report 2017/2018 brings to bear new evidence on the debate on the benefits and costs of international banks, particularly for developing countries. It provides evidence-based policy guidance on a range of issues that developing countries face. Countries that are open to international banking can benefit from global flows of funds, knowledge, and opportunity, but the regulatory challenges are complex and, at times, daunting.<br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://www.unicef.org/publications/index_101397.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">A Familiar Face: Violence in the lives of children and adolescents</a><br /> UNICEF</strong><br /> This report presents the most current data on four specific forms of violence – violent discipline and exposure to domestic abuse during early childhood; violence at school; violent deaths among adolescents; and sexual violence in childhood and adolescence. The statistics reveal that children experience violence across all stages of childhood, in diverse settings, and often at the hands of the trusted individuals with whom they interact daily. The report concludes with specific national actions and strategies that UNICEF has embraced to prevent and respond to violence against children.<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Thu, 16 Nov 2017 18:11:50 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7762 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-240 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <h4> <img alt="World of News" height="139" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="140" /><span>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</span></h4> <p> <strong><a href="https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2015/11/20/9764324/welfare-cash-transfer-work" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Economists tested 7 welfare programs to see if they made people lazy. They didn't.</a></strong><br /> Vox<br /> For as long as there have been government programs designed to help the poor, there have been critics insisting that helping the poor will keep them from working. But the evidence for this proposition has always been rather weak. And a recent study from MIT and Harvard economists makes the case even weaker. Abhijit Banerjee, Rema Hanna, Gabriel Kreindler, and Benjamin Olken reanalyzed data from seven randomized experiments evaluating cash programs in poor countries and found "no systematic evidence that cash transfer programs discourage work." Attacking welfare recipients as lazy is easy rhetoric, but when you actually test the proposition scientifically, it doesn't hold up.</p> <p> <strong><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-35051487" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">COP21: 'Fireworks' expected as new climate text published</a></strong><br /> BBC<br /> A critical "clean" draft text has been published at UN climate talks here in Paris after delays. This new version, 29 pages long, marks the first time the French presidency of the meeting has pulled together an outline of a deal. The new draft has significantly reduced the options on many of the key questions after days of negotiations. One observer warned that there could be "fireworks" if countries are unhappy with the compromises proposed. Last Saturday, negotiators from 195 countries agreed on a weighty 48-page document, the summation of four years of talks that began in Durban in 2011. That document was handed to the French president of COP21, Laurent Fabius. Over the past few days he has asked pairs of ministers from around the world to try to advance aspects of the document. </div></div></div> Thu, 10 Dec 2015 15:24:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7241 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere