HIV https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/729/all en Weekly wire: The global forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-321 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="180" /></a><strong>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br /><br /><strong><a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/12/05/568288743/is-life-better-now-than-50-years-ago-the-answer-may-depend-on-the-economy?ft=nprml&amp;f" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Is Life Better Now Than 50 Years Ago? The Answer May Depend On The Economy</a></strong></p> <div> <strong>National Public Radio, USA</strong></div> <div> The way people perceive their country's economic conditions plays a big role in whether they view their lives more positively now compared with the past, according to a study released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center. Of the nearly 43,000 people surveyed in 38 countries in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and North and South America, Vietnam had the most positive self-assessment: Eighty-eight percent of respondents said life is better today in their country than it was a half-century ago.</div> <div>  </div> <div> <strong><a href="https://theconversation.com/developing-countries-could-get-sick-before-they-get-rich-policy-can-help-87391" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Developing countries could get sick before they get rich. Policy can help</a></strong></div> <div> <strong>The Conversation</strong></div> <div> Improved human well-being is one of the modern era’s greatest triumphs. The age of plenty has also led to an unexpected global health crisis: two billion people are either overweight or obese. Developed countries have been especially susceptible to unhealthy weight gain, a trend that could be considered the price of abundance. However, developing countries are now facing a similar crisis.</div> <div>  </div> </div></div></div> Thu, 07 Dec 2017 18:07:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7768 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere The things we do: Can computer games contribute to HIV prevention? https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/things-we-do-can-computer-games-contribute-hiv-prevention <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div style="margin-bottom:10px; padding:5px; line-height:10px"> Also available in: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/voices/es/las-cosas-que-hacemos-los-videojuegos-pueden-contribuir-la-prevencion-del-vih" rel="nofollow">Español</a></div> <p> <img alt="" height="187" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/13506266905_0fcd724b31_z.jpg" style="float:right" title="Photo by Albert Gonzalez Farran/UNAMID." width="280" />Preventing and controlling HIV is essential to ensuring that everyone can lead healthy, productive lives. It is essential to address this disease if everyone is to share in global prosperity.  The international community has made significant gains in fighting the spread of HIV as well as in increasing the survival rate of those already infected.<br /><br /> However, women- and in particular young women- remain vulnerable to contracting the disease.  According to <a href="https://www.unaids.org/sites/default/files/media_asset/UNAIDS_Gap_report_en.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Gap Report from UNAIDS</a>, adolescent girls and young women account for one in four new HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa.  Globally, there are about 16 million women aged 15 years and older who are living with HIV, and 80% of them live in sub-Saharan Africa.  Within this region, women acquire HIV infections at least 5–7 years earlier than men, primarily through heterosexual transmission. While there is some research that younger women are more physiologically vulnerable to HIV, the evidence also points to several <a href="https://www.unaids.org/sites/default/files/media_asset/UNAIDS_Global_Report_2013_en_1.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">non-physiological factors that help account for gender inequalities</a>, including inequalities in education and economic opportunities, vulnerability to intimate partner violence, and women having sex with older men.</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 07 Jun 2016 15:53:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7422 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-239 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <p> <img alt="World of News" height="139" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="140" /><span>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</span><br />  </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p> <strong><a href="https://theconversation.com/how-the-new-peace-and-violence-development-goals-can-be-met-50998" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">How the new peace and violence development goals can be met</a></strong><br /> The Conversation<br /> For the first time, issues of violence and peace are part of a global development framework. The recently launched Sustainable Development Goals aim to “significantly reduce all forms of violence and related deaths everywhere”.  While admirable in its intent and ambition, is this possible? And, if so, how? Earlier global agreements, notably the Millennium Development Goals, did not consider issues of conflict and violence. Critics point to the omission as one reason areas affected by conflict and violence lagged so far behind peaceful and stable countries on achieving the goals. Human development indicators are often far worse in conflict areas.  On top of this delivering development is made more difficult by continuing violent insecurity, politicised divisions and militarisation. Unsurprisingly, people in these areas see reducing levels of violence and conflict as the most important way in which their lives could be improved.</p> <p> <strong><a href="https://www.greenbiz.com/article/understand-cop21-these-7-graphics" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Understand COP21 in these 7 graphics</a></strong><br /> GreenBiz<br /> Today marks the third day of COP21, a key milestone in the global effort to combat climate change. For the next two weeks, representatives from more than 190 countries will work towards creating a legally binding and universal agreement that spells out how countries will cooperate on climate change for decades to come. A strong Paris agreement can send the signal to the world that the global transformation to a climate-resilient, zero-carbon economy is underway. Here’s a visual look at recent progress the world has made, as well as what needs to be done in Paris and beyond to truly overcome the climate change challenge</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 03 Dec 2015 15:19:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7232 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: The Olympics of Inequality https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-olympics-inequality <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><A href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target=_blank>People, Spaces, Deliberation</A> bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.<BR>&nbsp;</P> <P>&nbsp;</P> <P><IFRAME src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9zj7Im3PubI" frameBorder=0 width=500 height=315 allowfullscreen=""></IFRAME></P> <P></div></div></div> Wed, 15 Aug 2012 14:39:26 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6071 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere