Text Messaging https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/11214/all en Blog post of the month: Six lessons I learnt while trying to reach 10 million women in India with life-saving health information https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/blog-post-month-six-lessons-i-learnt-while-trying-reach-10-million-women-india-life-saving-health <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <h4> Each month People, Spaces, Deliberation shares the blog post that generated the most interest and discussion. In March 2016, the featured blog post is "<a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/six-lessons-i-learnt-while-trying-reach-10-million-women-india-life-saving-health-information" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Six lessons I learnt while trying to reach 10 million women in India with life-saving health information</a>" by Priyanka Dutt.</h4> <p> <img alt="Kilkari mobile messaging" height="186" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/kilari1.jpg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:left" title=" BBC Media Action" width="280" />Last month, the Government of India launched a nationwide mobile health (mHealth) program designed by BBC Media Action, the BBC’s international development charity. The aim - to train 1 million community health workers and help nearly 10 million new and expecting mothers in India make healthier choices and lead longer, healthier lives.<br />  <br /><em>Mobile Academy</em> is an anytime, anywhere audio training course, delivered via mobile phone, designed to refresh the knowledge and strengthen the communication skills of community health workers. The objective is to enable the nation’s nearly one million health workers to more effectively persuade families to lead healthier lives.<br />  <br /><em>Kilkari</em>  (a baby’s gurgle) service delivers free, weekly, time-appropriate audio messages about pregnancy, childbirth, and childcare directly to the mobile phones of mothers and other family members from the second trimester of pregnancy until the child is one year old.<br /><br /> These services were originally <a href="https://www.rethink1000days.org/2013/08/lifeline-in-bihar/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">designed for use in Bihar </a>in North India, where BBC Media Action, in partnership with the state government works to improve demand for health services, improve social norms and impact health outcomes for mothers and children. <a href="https://www.rethink1000days.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Read more</a>.<br /><br /><em>Mobile Academy</em> and <em>Kilkari</em> leverage the massive penetration of mobile phones to reach the most marginalized, hardest-to-reach communities in India. These are communities where getting pregnant and having babies can be 24 times more life-threatening than giving birth in the United Kingdom!<br />  <br /> The statistics are pretty stark. Globally, every five minutes, three women die from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth, while 60 others will be left with debilitating injuries. Of these deaths, India accounts for the greatest number of women dying – over 150 every day. But we know how many of these health risks that pregnant women and their newborns face are preventable.<br /></div></div></div> Fri, 01 Apr 2016 15:52:00 +0000 BBC Media Action 7356 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Six lessons I learnt while trying to reach 10 million women in India with life-saving health information https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/six-lessons-i-learnt-while-trying-reach-10-million-women-india-life-saving-health-information <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> Priyanka Dutt shares what she has learned while implementing a mobile health program for women in India.</h4> <p> <img alt="Kilkari mobile messaging" height="186" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/kilari1.jpg" style="float:left" title=" BBC Media Action" width="280" />Last month, the Government of India launched a nationwide mobile health (mHealth) program designed by BBC Media Action, the BBC’s international development charity. The aim - to train 1 million community health workers and help nearly 10 million new and expecting mothers in India make healthier choices and lead longer, healthier lives.<br />  <br /><em>Mobile Academy</em> is an anytime, anywhere audio training course, delivered via mobile phone, designed to refresh the knowledge and strengthen the communication skills of community health workers. The objective is to enable the nation’s nearly one million health workers to more effectively persuade families to lead healthier lives.<br />  <br /><em>Kilkari</em>  (a baby’s gurgle) service delivers free, weekly, time-appropriate audio messages about pregnancy, childbirth, and childcare directly to the mobile phones of mothers and other family members from the second trimester of pregnancy until the child is one year old.<br /><br /> These services were originally <a href="https://www.rethink1000days.org/2013/08/lifeline-in-bihar/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">designed for use in Bihar </a>in North India, where BBC Media Action, in partnership with the state government works to improve demand for health services, improve social norms and impact health outcomes for mothers and children. <a href="https://www.rethink1000days.org" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Read more</a>.<br /><br /><em>Mobile Academy</em> and <em>Kilkari</em> leverage the massive penetration of mobile phones to reach the most marginalized, hardest-to-reach communities in India. These are communities where getting pregnant and having babies can be 24 times more life-threatening than giving birth in the United Kingdom!<br />  <br /> The statistics are pretty stark. Globally, every five minutes, three women die from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth, while 60 others will be left with debilitating injuries. Of these deaths, India accounts for the greatest number of women dying – over 150 every day. But we know how many of these health risks that pregnant women and their newborns face are preventable.<br /><br /></div></div></div> Tue, 08 Mar 2016 17:39:00 +0000 BBC Media Action 7332 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: U-Report mobilizes youth via SMS and social media https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-u-report-mobilizes-youth-sms-and-social-media <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: <a href="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.</h4> <p> In 2011, UNICEF launched an innovative program called <a href="https://www.ureport.ug/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">“U-report” in Uganda</a>. The goal was to use the ubiquity and connectivity of mobile phones to ask young people what they thought about specific issues affecting their community and then encourage them to participate in community-led development projects. <br /><br /> The <a href="https://www.ureport.in/home/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">U-report</a> system works by sending polls, asking for feedback and providing information via SMS and social media to volunteers, known as “U-reporters”. Weekly polls are sent out on Wednesday and results are shared on Monday. There is no charge at all for a U-reporter to send any message, which enables greater response rates. U-Report is powered by <a href="https://www.rapidpro.io/" target="_blank" title="RapidPro" rel="nofollow">RapidPro</a>, an open source solution, which different countries can implement.<br /><br /> The information that is collected can also be used by local and national media or sent to key stakeholders to alert them to the challenges their constituents are facing.<br /><br /><img alt="Uganda National Pulse, U-Report" height="483" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/ugandanationalpulse.png" title="" width="800" /><br /><br /> Today, there are over 280,000 U-Reporters in Uganda alone and 800,000 in over 14 countries worldwide, including <a href="https://mexico.ureport.in/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Mexico</a>, <a href="https://www.ureportindonesia.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Indonesia</a>, and others across Africa. By the end of 2015, U-Report is expected to expand to approximately 20 countries and reach 1 million young people.</p> </div></div></div> Wed, 27 May 2015 16:00:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7060 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-123 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/medium_weekly_wire_photo_12.jpeg" style="float:right; height:120px; width:120px" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><strong>International Journal of Communication</strong><br /><br /><a href="https://ijoc.org/ojs/index.php/ijoc/article/view/1755" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Online Civic Cultures? Debating Climate Change Activism on YouTube</a><br /><br /> "This article explores the potential of video activism on YouTube to form a communicative space for deliberation and dissent. It asks how commenting on activist videos can help sustain civic cultures that allow for both antagonism and inclusive political debate. Drawing on a case study of online debates spurred by the video War on Capitalism, which called for protest against the 15th United Nations Climate Change Conference, the article offers an empirical analysis that operationalizes the framework of civic cultures. In so doing, it investigates the ways in which activist videos are received by potentially transnational publics and how online modes of debate engage notions of the public sphere in contemporary online environments." <a href="https://ijoc.org/ojs/index.php/ijoc/article/view/1755" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">READ MORE</a><br /><br /><br /><strong>National Geographic</strong><br /><br /><a href="https://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2013/06/26/aid-workers-turn-to-text-messaging-to-improve-food-aid-delivery-to-refugees-in-the-western-sahara/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Aid Workers Turn to Text Messaging to Improve Food Aid Delivery to Refugees in the Western Sahara</a><br /><br /> "Communication between beneficiaries and food aid providers in the Western Sahara refugee camps in Algeria suffers as the number of food distribution points increases. Rosa Akbari worked as an independent researcher funded by a grant from the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) to explore better communication tools to be used within the camps. What she found was a society prepped for technological innovation. By using what was already in place – a mobile phone in each household – Rosa capitalized on existing flows of information as they worked without technology and used FrontlineSMS to ease the communication within the camps." <a href="https://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2013/06/26/aid-workers-turn-to-text-messaging-to-improve-food-aid-delivery-to-refugees-in-the-western-sahara/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">READ MORE</a></p> </div></div></div> Wed, 03 Jul 2013 18:09:00 +0000 Johanna Martinsson 6392 at https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere