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What Works in Promoting Women-Led SMEs?
April 5, 2016Washington, DC

This BBL presents evidence from Nigeria, Tunisia and Togo on what works to support women-led businesses improve their performance and close the gaps between male and female entrepreneurs.

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Female entrepreneurs make significant contributions to growth and poverty reduction worldwide but face greater obstacles than their male counterparts. Their businesses are typically smaller, employ fewer people and are more likely to be concentrated into smaller and informal firms and in the retail sector.  Today’s BBL presents evidence from Nigeria, Tunisia and Togo on what works to support women-led businesses improve their performance and close the gaps between male and female entrepreneurs. The work is supported by the Women’s Leadership in Small and Medium Enterprises (WLSME) a trust fund partnership with USAID that aims to promote a better understanding of the key determinants of successful women-led SMEs in developing countries.  WLSME is co-financing rigorous evaluations of interventions in 12 countries across Africa, Central Asia, the Caribbean, the Middle East and North Africa and South Asia.

Chair:

Caren Grown, Senior Director, Gender Cross-Cutting Solutions Area, World Bank Group

Presenters:

David McKenzie
“Identifying and Spurring High-Growth Entrepreneurship: Experimental Evidence from a Business Plan Competition” (Nigeria). for 

Stefanie Brodmann 
“Entrepreneurship Education for University Students in Tunisia: Long-Term Impact Evaluation Results,” co-authors Patrick Premand and Jumana Alaref

Markus Goldstein 
“Which Skills for Women’s Success? Preliminary results of an impact evaluation of entrepreneurship training programs in Togo,” co-authors Francisco Campos, Leonardo Iacovone, Hillary Johnson and David McKenzie

A light lunch will be provided (first come, first served)

  • Caren Grown

    Dr.Grown is an internationally recognized expert on gender issues in development. Prior to joining the Bank, she was Economist-In-Residence and co-director of the Program on Gender Analysis in Economics at American University (AU) in Washington, DC. Dr. Grown’s recent books include Taxation and Gender Equity, co-edited with Imraan Valodia (Routledge 2010), The Feminist Economics of Trade, co-edited with Irene Van Staveren, Diane Elson, and Nilufer Cagatay (Routledge 2007), and Trading Women's Health and Rights: the Role of Trade Liberalization and Development, co-edited with Elissa Braunstein and Anju Malhotra (Zed Books 2006).
  • David McKenzie

    Mr.McKenzie is a Lead Economist in the Development Research Group, Finance and Private Sector Development Unit. He received his B.Com.(Hons) B.A. from the University of Auckland, New Zealand and his Ph.D. in Economics from Yale University. His main research is on migration, enterprise development, and methodology for use with developing country data. He has published more than 100 articles and is currently on the editorial boards of the Journal of Development Economics, the World Bank Economic Review and Migration Studies. He is also a co-founder and regular contributor to the Development Impact blog.
  • Stefanie Brodmann

    Ms.Brodmann is a Senior Economist at the World Bank's Social Protection and Labor Global Practice. She has been working on issues related to labor markets, safety nets, education-to-work transition, and labor migration since joining the World Bank in 2009. She holds a doctorate from the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona and was a visiting PhD student at Harvard University and a post-doctoral fellow at Princeton University. Her current work focuses on social safety nets, social registries, nutrition, program evaluation, youth employment, and entrepreneurship education.
  • Markus Goldstein

    Mr.Goldstein is a development economist with experience working in Sub-Saharan Africa, East Asia, and South Asia. He is currently a Lead Economist in the office of the Chief Economist for Africa at the World Bank, where he leads the Africa Gender Innovation Lab. His current research centers on issues of gender and economic activity, focusing on agriculture and small scale enterprises. He is involved in a number of impact evaluations on these topics across Sub-Saharan Africa. His other research areas include HIV/AIDS, land tenure and the economics of poverty. He holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. He is also a co-founder and regular contributor to the Development Impact blog.
Event Details
  • When: 12:30-2 p.m. ET
  • where: JB 1-080, World Bank Group Headquarters
  • CONTACT: Mame Niasse
  • mniasse@worldbank.org