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BRIEF October 19, 2021

Indonesia COVID-19 Observatory

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www.worldbank.org/indonesia/covid19monitor

 

The COVID-19 pandemic and the containment measures are impacting Indonesian households through three broad channels: (i) the income/employment channel, which includes both labor and non-labor income, (ii) the price channel that may affect the affordability of essential commodities, and (iii) the long-term human capital channel. The government of Indonesia has already adopted several mitigating measures, but more data and information over time are needed to determine the adequacy of these efforts.

As the economic impacts and policy response continue to co-evolve during the pandemic, there is a strong demand for information on:

  • The transmission mechanisms of the health and socio-economic impact on the population;
  • The impact on medium, small and micro enterprises that are sources of livelihood for most informal workers;
  • The reach and efficacy of the public policy responses put in place by the Government as the population copes; and
  • Evolving sentiments and perceptions of the population as the crisis unfolds.

Set up in March 2020 with support of the Australian Government through the Partnership for Knowledge-Based Poverty Reduction Trust Fund and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the World Bank Indonesia COVID-19 Observatory is a constellation of quick-deploying data collection efforts that respond to this demand. It aims to generate near-real-time insights on the impact of the COVID-19 crisis and inform the policymaking process by identifying gaps that may require scaling up or redirecting of policy responses to under-covered areas as the crisis unfolds.

The observatory monitors:

  1. Social media platforms while conducting rapid polls to solicit information on citizen knowledge, concerns, and sentiments, including policy responses.
  2. Socioeconomic impacts of COVID-19 on households through a national phone-based high-frequency (HiFy) survey that tracks impacts of COVID-19 on over 4,000 households during the emergency response and economic recovery phases of the pandemic.
  3. Impacts on firms through surveys with a focus on merchants that sell on large online platforms.

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Social Media Monitoring

Monitor select social media platforms and conduct rapid polls to solicit information on citizen knowledge, behaviors, concerns and sentiments, including towards government policy responses

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High Frequency (HiFy) Household Survey

A nationally representative phone-based survey that tracks impacts of COVID-19 on over 4,000 households


Brief Series


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Education Services During the COVID-19 Pandemic

November - December 2020

While most schools across Indonesia remained closed for face-toface learning, the vast majority of students were engaged in distance learning and a small minority had dropped out.

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Health Services During the COVID-19 Pandemic

November - December 2020

Coverage of testing for COVID-19 slowly improved but remained much lower than in peer countries. 

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Impacts on Digital Merchants: Insights from the Bukalapak

May 20- June 27, 2020

Online sales have been more resilient than offline sales, though Bukalapak merchants with certain characteristics were harder hit than others.

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Ex-ante Poverty and Distributional Impacts of COVID–19 in Indonesia

June 26, 2020

Without the emergency social assistance for households, Covid-19 could push between 5.5 and 8 million Indonesians into poverty

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How COVID-19 is Affecting Firms in Indonesia : Results from Round One of the COVID-19 Business Pulse Survey

June 15 - 23, 2020

Firms across the provinces surveyed and in almost all sectors surveyed were negatively affected by the COVID-19 crisis.1 They were affected simultaneously by multiple channels.

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High-Frequency Monitoring of Households : Summary of Results from Survey Round One

01-17 May, 2020

With businesses closed and largescale mobility restrictions imposed after the Covid-19 outbreak, 24 percent of breadwinners – mostly wage workers and non-farm business owners – had stopped working by May 2020

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Social Media Monitoring

April – May, 2020

Discussion on COVID-19 in social media spiked around the time large-scale social restrictions were introduced and common topics of conversation revolved around health care, food access, and job loss.