João Pedro Azevedo

João Pedro Azevedo

Lead Economist, Education

João Pedro Azevedo is a Lead Economist, EdTech Fellow and Education Statistics Coordinator from the World Bank Education Global Practice. He currently works on projects related the measurement and operationalization of World Bank Human Capital Project and the World Bank Learning Target, and on the scale up of population measures of educational outcomes. Previously, Joao Pedro was a Lead Economist and Global Lead at the World Bank Poverty and Equity Global Practice where he co-led the Global Solution Group on Welfare Measurement and Statistical Capacity for Results as well as the Data for Goals agenda. In the past ten years Joao Pedro has led country work in Croatia, Bulgaria, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Turkey, Colombia, Brazil and the Dominican Republic and helped create and lead global public efforts such as the Global Team for Statistical Development, as well as Europe and Central Asia and Latin American & Caribbean Teams for Statistical Development, as well as LAC Monitoring and Evaluation Network. Before joining the Bank, João Pedro served as the superintendent of Monitoring and Evaluation at the Secretary of Finance for the State of Rio de Janeiro, as well as a research fellow at the Institute of Applied Economic Research from the Brazilian Ministry of Planning (IPEA). While at IPEA, Joao Pedro led the design, implementation and dissemination of the Monitoring and Evaluation systems for the Brazilian Adult Literacy program “Brazil Alfabetizado” from the Secretary of Adult Education at the Ministry of Education. Also while in Brazil, Joao Pedro often worked with private sector foundations, such as Fundação Roberto Marinho and the Instituto Itaú-Unibanco on the design and evaluation of educational programs. He is a former chairman of the Latin American & Caribbean Network on Inequality and Poverty and holds a PhD in Economics.


Contact
Tel : 202-473-0518
jazevedo@worldbank.org


AREAS OF EXPERTISE
  • Education
  • Inequality and Shared Prosperity
  • Social Protection and Growth
  • Poverty