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World Bank Education, Technology & Innovation: SABER-ICT Technical Paper Series


World Bank Education, Technology & Innovation: SABER-ICT Technical Paper Series
(series coordinator: Michael Trucano)

The World Bank Education, Technology & Innovation: SABER-ICT Technical Paper Series explores a variety of topics and issues related to the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the education sector.

The Systems Approach for Better Education Results (SABER) initiative seeks to improve the global knowledge base related to education systems analyses, assessments, diagnoses, and opportunities for dialogue. SABER-ICT aims to improve the availability of policy-related data, information, and knowledge on what matters most in using ICTs to improve the quality of education. 

This publication series is made possible through generous support from the Government of Korea, with which the World bank enjoys a strong, multi-year partnership exploring issues related to the use of ICTs in education, most notably through the Korea - World Bank Partnership Facility. Many individual papers in this series have benefited from support from other sources as well, including the Multi-Donor Education and Skills Fund (MESF) and the Government of Sweden.

list of papers

[#01] SABER-ICT Framework Paper for Policy Analysis: Documenting national educational technology policies around the world and their evolution over time (Michael Trucano)

[#02] Building and sustaining national ICT/education agencies: Lessons from international experiences (Michael Trucano & Gavin Dykes)

[#03] Building and sustaining national ICT/education agencies: Lessons from Korea (KERIS) (Youngsun Kwon & Sanghyun Jang)

[#04] Building and sustaining national ICT/education agencies: Lessons from Malaysia (Smart Schools) (Molly N.N. Lee & Soon Seng Thah)

[#05] The Role and Status of National Research and Education Networks (NRENs) in Africa (Michael Foley)

[#06] Building and sustaining national ICT/education agencies: Lessons from England (Becta) (Gavin Dykes)

[#07] Building and sustaining national ICT/education agencies: Lessons from Chile (Enlaces) (Eugenio Severin)

[#08] Building and sustaining national ICT/education agencies: Lessons from Armenia (NaCET) (Edmond Gaible and Anush Shahverdyan)

[#09] Building and sustaining national ICT/education agencies: Lessons from Uruguay (Plan Ceibal) (Eugenio Severin)

[#010] Building and sustaining national ICT/education agencies: Lessons from Indonesia (PUSTEKKOM) (Neil Butcher & Petra Bodrogini)

[#11] Evoke -- Developing Skills in Youth to Solve the World’s Most Complex Problems: The Social Innovators’ Framework (Barbara Freeman & Robert Hawkins)

[#12] Technologies in education across the Americas: The promise and the peril – and some potential ways forward (Michael Trucano)

[#13] Building and sustaining national ICT/education agencies: Lessons from Costa Rica (The Omar Dengo Foundation) (Carla Jimenez Iglesias)

[#14] Building and sustaining national ICT/education agencies: Lessons from Thailand (NECTEC/Schoolnet Thailand) (Saowaruj Rattanakhamfu)

[#15] Building and sustaining national ICT/education agencies: Lessons from the Philippines (Benjamin Vergel De Dios)

[#16] Building and sustaining national ICT/education agencies: Lessons from Australia (EdNA) (Gerald White & Lesley Parker)

[#17] ICT and the Education of Refugees: A Stocktaking of Innovative Approaches in the MENA Region. Lessons of Experience and Guiding Principles (Kent Lewis with Simon Thacker)

[#18] Digital teaching and learning materials: Opportunities, options and issues (Michael Trucano)

[#19] Developing Skills in Youth to Solve the World’s Most Complex Problems: Contextualization, Implementation, and Experimental Research. Lessons from Evoke (Barbara Freeman & Robert Hawkins)

[#20] Developing Skills in Youth to Solve the World’s Most Complex Problems: Applications and Sustainability. Lessons from Evoke (Barbara Freeman & Robert Hawkins)

 
note: Content from many of these papers first appeared, in draft form and in slightly different formats, on the World Bank's EduTech blog.


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