Events
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Praxis Discussion: Labour Mobility in the Pacific
May 30, 2014World Bank office, Level 19, 14 Martin Place, Sydney, NSW

In the Pacific, research suggests that labor migration will be pivotal in meeting a growing demand for employment - and that seasonal worker programs could offer an important precedent. But can the benefits from migration be amplified for developing nation... s? Are there tradeoffs for those back home, and are the costs of skilled emigration really too high for some countries? Follow our televised panel discussion on labor mobility in the Pacific.  See More

International migration in the Asia-Pacific region is increasing, with more than 3 million people leaving their countries each year to work overseas.

According to new data released by the United Nations, there were 230 million international migrants globally (over 3 percent of the world's population) in 2013.

Increasingly, while this poses new challenges, it is being recognized as an opportunity for development, bringing significant gains for household income, countries' GDP as well as health and education outcomes, with global remittance flows amounting to $440 billion last year alone.

In the Pacific, a region with the largest and one of the fastest growing youth populations in the world, new research suggests that labour migration will be especially pivotal in meeting a growing demand for employment - and that seasonal worker programs could offer an important precedent.

But can the benefits from migration be amplified for developing nations? Are there tradeoffs for those back home, and are the costs of skilled emigration really too high for some countries?

What has been the impact of the seasonal worker schemes at home and abroad to date, and what might their future hold? 

To discuss these issues and more, we are joined by Mai Malaualu, Labour Migration Specialist at the World Bank, who will be discussing findings of a new report "Wellbeing from Work in the Pacific Island Countries" , Luke Craven from the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Sydney and Ms Kanasa, Ikale Contractors, an Australian employment company which works with employees from Tonga and Tuvalu on the Australian Seasonal Worker Program.

 

Follow on Twitter: @WorldBankAsia #PacificPraxis
Watch on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FE8A490B08CB2DB&feature=plcp


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Refreshments will be provided. The discussion will last an hour, with 30 minutes set aside for questions from the audience. 
RSVP: We need to confirm numbers by 5pm Wednesday, May 28th. Please email us at pacificmedia@worldbank.org, to register your attendance. As this is a catered event, please only RSVP if your attendance is assured.  


 

 

  • Mai Malaualu

    Labour Migration Specialist – The World Bank
    Born in Samoa, Mai migrated to New Zealand with her parents and siblings when she was 3 months old at a time when planes were not the common mode of international travel, it took 3 weeks to arrive in Auckland by boat and departing families were farewelled with the belief that they would never again see those they were leaving behind. Mai was privileged to share with some talented and committed people in NZ and the Pacific, the opportunity to design and establish New Zealand’s Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme and in 2008 joined the work of the World Bank in this area.
  • Luke Craven

    School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Sydney
    Luke Craven is a PhD student within the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Sydney. His work focuses on international migration, food systems, and the sustainable city. He is particularly interested in understanding the everyday experiences of migration, both at home and away. Luke holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Sydney and was awarded the University Medal for his thesis which examined the implications of temporary migration in rural Vanautu.
  • WHEN: Friday 30 May, 1pm – 2pm (please arrive by 12:45pm in order to be seated on time)
  • WHERE: World Bank office, Level 19, 14 Martin Place, Sydney, NSW
  • MODERATOR: Bronwyn Adcock, Journalist