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Land Reform and Welfare in Vietnam: Why Gender of the Land-Rights Holder Matters

January 28, 2014

Washington, D.C.

A matched sample of households from the 2004 and 2008 Household Living Standards Survey suggests that on balance, land-use rights held exclusively by women or jointly by couples have several beneficial effects, including increased household expenditures and women’s self-employment, and lower household vulnerability to poverty.

Event Details

A Gender and Development Seminar Series Event

This session examines Vietnam's 1993 Land Law, which created a land market by granting households land-use rights which could be exchanged, leased, inherited, sold or mortgaged. Land Reform and Welfare in Vietnam: Why Gender of the Land-Rights Holder Matters uses quantitative and qualitative methods to analyze whether increased land titling led to discernible improvements in the economic security of households, and whether land titles in women's names had markedly different effects as compared to titles held by men.

A matched sample of households from the 2004 and 2008 Household Living Standards Survey suggests that on balance, land-use rights held exclusively by women or jointly by couples have several beneficial effects, including increased household expenditures and women’s self-employment, and lower household vulnerability to poverty. Qualitative evidence suggests that increased bargaining power in the home was the main channel.

Event Recording
Speaker Bios

Speaker:
Yana Rodgers
Professor and Graduate Director in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department, Rutgers University

Discussant:
Markus Goldstein
Practice Leader, Africa Region Chief Economist Office, World Bank 

Chair: 
Jeni Klugman
Director, Gender and Development, World Bank