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Indigenous Knowledge Program for Development


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Knowledge Pack : South Africa

This Knowledge Pack contains Indigenous Knowledge cases and other useful information related to South Africa. The indigenous knowledge pack is a tool that provides users with quick access to synthesized information by country or selected thematic area.

For more Information on the
Indigenous Knowledge Program
please contact: Reinhard Woytek

Local IK Sources


Bank Projects related
to IK


Other Sources


Contributions


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IK Cases

Environment

Learning approaches in the field of environment

Education

Integrating non-formal education to reform official schooling

Mature age entry schemes in Southern African universities

Health

Potatoes used to boost immunity of HIV/AIDS patients

 

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Indigenous knowledge is combined with formal knowledge to develop learning approaches in the field of environment


Summary:
This project promotes environmental learning (EL) as an approach that integrates formal, informal, and non-formal learning process and scientific and indigenous knowledge systems to inculcate environmental knowledge, skills, attitudes, values, and behaviour within schools and communities. The project will bring together key players and practitioners in selected countries of Eastern and Southern Africa to formulate and develop approaches that would make learning related to the sustainable management of the environment more effective and better coordinated while incorporating indigenous/community knowledge and experiences, and building on the strengths of women as environmental managers. Preparatory activities and a workshop will clarify the major issues related to EL and how it can be initiated in the participating countries. Research will analyze and document the capacities, resources, content, practices, and methodologies for learning that exist in the region and can be used to improve strategies for learning. Special attention will be paid to gender dimensions of learning. The project will also explore the use of ICTs (information/communication technologies) to enhance effective learning and assess what capacities need to be strengthened for this. A regional steering committee will oversee project activities to be undertaken by national institutions in participating countries, while the coordinating institution will provide support and disseminate results.


Lesson:
Integrating indigenous knowledge into environment teachings, is a means to bridge the gap between formal and informal knowledge.


Source:
IDRC (International Development Research Center) Environmental Learning in Communities and Schools in Eastern and Southern Africa


External Link:
IDRC


Contact:
PETER_CROAL@acdi-cida.gc.ca



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Integrating non-formal education to reform official schooling

Summary: The Republic of South Africa faced enormous educational changes with the end of official apartheid and the accession of a majority government to power. Among them was the challenge how to devise curricula that reflect the aspirations, needs and history of the entire population; and how to provide for the continuing education of the many young people whose schooling had been interrupted by the upheaval surrounding this transition. Much of the initiative for reform of the educational system seems to be coming from the non-formal sector, where NGOs and government have been involved in creating strategies for completion of secondary schooling by adults no longer enrolled and in molding approaches and contents to fit their needs. The resulting approaches have been proposed as models for the renewal of formal education, and the ensuing controversy provides insights into the potentials and pitfalls of educational reform driven by the non-formal sector.

Lesson: NGOs play an important intermediary role in re-designing an education system to integrate local needs

Source: University of Florida, IK-Notes (to be published)

Contact: pmohan@worldbank.org


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Mature age entry schemes in Southern African universities

Summary: A number of the universities of Southern African countries have embarked upon "mature age entry schemes" designed to enable "overage" applicants to matriculate in higher education, a priority of a particular importance in countries like South Africa where the turbulence of social revolution denied many potential applicants the opportunity to follow a normal academic course into the university. In Zimbabwe and Botswana, fully 10-20% of total university intake is presently comprised of these students. A study of their characteristics, their successes and their failures demonstrates that they have above average achievement records but are severely underrepresented in the natural sciences, where continuing faculty prejudices and the lack of external facilities for remedial work in scholastic science leave few able to meet requirements.

Lesson: By allowing overage applicants access to universities, local perspectives can be brought into scholastic science.

Source: University of Florida, IK-Notes (to be published)

Contact: pmohan@worldbank.org


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A potato, a traditional medicinal plant used to treat chronic viral and bacterial diseases and some forms of cancer, is now recognized by physicians to boost the immune system of HIV-infected people.

Summary: A potato (or Hypoxis), a medicinal plant growing in Kwa Zulu Natal, traditionally used to treat chronic viral and bacterial diseases, was originally used by traditional healers to treat cancer of the bladder and prostate, and according to some sources sexually transmitted diseases, had shown that it contained two substances called sterols and sterolins, which are essential dietary fats or lipids, and has helped many people to recover quicker from chronic and other diseases. It is a partly poisonous root, but with the right preparation and dosage, and, although not a cure, it is an approved immuno booster to assist the body's natural defense system. The University of Stellenbosch of (South Africa) has done extensive research on this traditional medicine and developed easy to take tablets and has indicated that, although the potato is not sufficient treatment on its own, it could be extremely helpful when used together with other forms of treatment. According to Professor Patrick Bouic, who heads the department of immunology at the University of Stellenbosch, and Professor Ruben Sher of HIVCare International, the plant had shown the ability to increase CD4 counts (the amount of white blood cells in the body); to stabilize the patient; increase the weight of patients; and decrease the amount of HIV in the body. They also emphasized the importance of combining Western and traditional medicines in treating terminal illnesses. The root-based medicine is sold in the form of capsules and should be purchased in health centers or pharmacies only.

Lesson: Combining Western and traditional medicines in treating terminal illnesses may help developing efficient treatments

Source: The Sowetan (Johannesburg) May 21, 1999 By Mokgadi Pela

Contact: nayachi@worldbank.org

 


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Local IK Sources

Environmental Monitoring Group

PO Box 18977

Wynberg, Northern Cape Province

7824

South Africa

Tel: ++27 +21 761 0549

Email: dryland@global.co.cz

 

 

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Bank Projects

Cape Peninsula Biodiversity Conservation Project

The objective of the Cape Peninsula Biodiversity Conservation Project is to ensure rehabilitation and sustainable protection of the globally significant flora and related fauna of the Cape Peninsula in South Africa including surrounding marine ecosystems, and to initiate conservation planning and conservation activities for the entire Cape Floral Kingdom. To achieve this objective, the project will help establish and strengthen initial management of a new Cape Peninsula National Park by accelerated clearing of invasive alien species (acacia and pine trees) and annual follow-up maintenance using labor-intensive techniques that facilitate natural regeneration of indigenous species; environmental education; enhanced fire management; improved tourist infrastructure and information; capacity building among contract labor; a pilot-type marine protection program; and a knowledge management component comprising monitoring and evaluation and conservation activities for the entire Cape Floral Kingdom. To achieve this objective, the project will help establish and strengthen initial management of a new Cape Peninsula National Park by accelerated clearing of invasive alien species (acacia and pine trees) and annual follow-up maintenance using labor-intensive techniques that facilitate natural regeneration of indigenous species; environmental education; enhanced fire management; improved tourist infrastructure and information; capacity building among contract labor; a pilot-type marine protection program; and a knowledge management component comprising monitoring and evaluation.


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Transfrontier Conservation Areas Pilot and Institutional Strengthening Project

The Trans-Frontier Conservation Areas (TFCA) project is a Bank supported initiative to promote natural resource management in southern Africa. The goal of this project is to assist the government to create enabling policies, activities and institutional framework for rehabilitating, conserving and managing its unique biodiversity and natural resource endowments in three transfrontier conservation areas. The project will contribute to poverty reduction by assisting local communities inside and around the conservation areas, through capacity building. Land and natural resource security measures and small scale conservation and development activities.

 

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Bank Sources

Indigenous Knowledge for Development Link to the Homepage of the Indigenous Knowledge for Development Program of the Africa Region

Database of Indigenous Knowledge and Practices Link to the Database of Practices of the Indigenous Knowledge for Development Program of the Africa Region

IK Notes Newsletter Link to the IK Notes of the Indigenous Knowledge for Development Program of the Africa Region

An Introduction to the
Microfinance Institutions Contact List

 

External Sources

Register for Best Practices in Indigenous Knowledge Link to the database of Best Practices of UNESCO

Nuffic/CIRAN IK Development Monitor and Addresses of Other IK Centers Link to the Addresses of Other IK Centers and CIRAN's IK-Pages

Please send feedback or comments to rwoytek@worldbank.org

Should you know of other indigenous knowledge practices that have helped or may help to improve Bank programs, please share them with us. We will enter your contribution into the IK-Database.

 

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 IK Contribution Format

1. Country:

Where is the practice applied (country and location)?

2. Domain:

In which sector is the practice applied (agriculture, health, social development etc.)?

3. Technology:

What technology (e.g. soil erosion control, childcare, institutional development etc.)?

4. Bearers of Knowledge:

By whom is the practice applied (e.g. Washambaa, local healers, women's group of a given village etc.)?

5. Source:

Where can we inquire further?

Primary provider information (probably yourself or your institution)

Secondary providers of information

Add references to literature, web sites, names of individuals or organizations that can corroborate the practice.

Include addresses of primary and secondary providers of information.

6. Descriptive headline of practice:

One to two lines capturing the main features of a practice.

7. Summary:

Describe the main features of the practice and explain (not more than 200 words).

8. Lessons:

Answer three key questions related to efficacy and impact of the practice.

- Why it is important for the local community?

- Why might it be beneficial to other communities?

- Why should development organizations learn more about this practice?

9. Methods used to capture information:

How was the practice identified, recorded and documented?

NB:

The IK database is an open, on-line resource for information on indigenous knowledge practices. The database acts as a referral system and does not disclose the technical details of practices or applications. Most practices in the database have been reported elsewhere in publicly accessible information sources. As is the principle of a referral database the provider of information could be asked by users of the database to provide further information or pointers as regards details of the practice. It is to the discretion of the provider of information and the inquirer to negotiate the terms of the exchange of knowledge. No information provided will be made public without the consent of the provider.

Should you know of other indigenous knowledge practices that have helped or may help to improve Bank programs, please share them with us. We will enter your contribution into the IK-Database.

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